The Sunday Magazine

Canada's hidden racism; Intergenerational choir; Patty Hearst and the SLA; Students rate universities

What the reaction to Colten Boushie's death reveals about racism in Canada: Colten Boushie was killed when he drove onto a farmer's land looking for help with a flat tire. The farmer has been charged with murder. An outpouring of rabid social media posts shows many Canadians believe Mr. Boushie, who was Aboriginal, deserved to be shot because he must have been planning to rob the farmer. Rachel's guest is Charlotte Loppie, professor in the School of Public Health and Social Policy, and director of the Centre for Indigenous Research and Community-Led Engagement at the University of Victoria. Professor Loppie is of Mi'kmaq and Acadian ancestry. "The Person I've Become" - an Alisa Siegel documentary: An inspiring story about an intergenerational choir in London, Ontario. Teenagers sing side-by-side with people with Alzheimer's disease; both benefit from the relationships that form. The surreal saga of Patty Hearst and the Symbionese Liberation Army: Jeffrey Toobin, the journalist and legal analyst for The New Yorker and CNN, chronicles the weirdly rollicking tale of newspaper heiress Patty Hearst. Her kidnapping and brief stint as a foot soldier with a terrorist group had the world transfixed in the mid-1970s. Students rate their universities: Are today's universities degree-granting businesses hoping to attract "funding units" for maximum prestige? What is the role of digital technology in the classroom? Four young people report on the good and the bad in Canadian universities. Great music this week from: The Jacques Loussier Trio, singer-songwriter Irish Mythen, Sammy Cahn and Jule Styne, guitarist Norbert Kraft, and singer-songwriter Ndidi Onokwulu.

What the reaction to Colten Boushie's death reveals about racism in Canada: Colten Boushie was killed when he drove onto a farmer's land looking for help with a flat tire. The farmer has been charged with murder. An outpouring of rabid social media posts shows many Canadians believe Mr. Boushie, who was Aboriginal, deserved to be shot because he must have been planning to rob the farmer. Rachel's guest is Charlotte Loppie, professor in the School of Public Health and Social Policy, and director of the Centre for Indigenous Research and Community-Led Engagement at the University of Victoria. Professor Loppie is of Mi'kmaq and Acadian ancestry.

"The Person I've Become" - an Alisa Siegel documentary: An inspiring story about an intergenerational choir in London, Ontario. Teenagers sing side-by-side with people with Alzheimer's disease; both benefit from the relationships that form.

The surreal saga of Patty Hearst and the Symbionese Liberation Army:  Jeffrey Toobin, the journalist and legal analyst for The New Yorker and CNN, chronicles the weirdly rollicking tale of newspaper heiress Patty Hearst. Her kidnapping and brief stint as a foot soldier with a terrorist group had the world transfixed in the mid-1970s.

Students rate their universities: Are today's universities degree-granting businesses hoping to attract "funding units" for maximum prestige? What is the role of digital technology in the classroom? Four young people report on the good and the bad in Canadian universities.

Great music this week from: The Jacques Loussier Trio, singer-songwriter Irish Mythen, Sammy Cahn and Jule Styne, guitarist Norbert Kraft, singer-songwriter Ndidi Onokwulu and Montreal's own Oliver Jones.

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