The Sunday Magazine

American hypocrisy on Russian hacking; Why young men?; An over-the-phone book club; Bach and anti-Semitism

America's hypocrisy over Russia's cyber-interference in the presidential election - Michael's essay: Here's an excerpt: "The involvement by the United States in dictating and directing the political life of other countries has a long and sordid history going back to the middle of the 19th Century." What links young men who join gangs in North America, to young men who join ISIS in Europe? Law professor Jamil Jivani grew up in a tough neighbourhood near Toronto. He travelled to Molenbeek, the tough neighbourhood in Brussels where many of the Paris attackers grew up, to investigate the roots of anger, alienation and radicalization. Music that changed your world: Listeners tell us about the music that affected them at critical moments in their lives. We'll hear their stories along with music from West Side Story, The Sorcerer's Apprentice, Paul Robeson, Tom Lehrer, Clint Eastwood singing in the musical Paint Your Wagon, and Lighthouse's big-band big hit, "One Fine Morning." A book club for two, still going after 35 years — on the phone: Two friends. Two cities. With their very own read-aloud book club. A little War and Peace down the line? Alisa Siegel'sdocumentary is called, Telephone Books. Stuart Hamilton: The renowned vocal coach, former "Saturday Afternoon at the Opera" host, and long-time contributor to the New York Metropolitan's opera quiz, died on New Year's Day at the age of 87. He talked to Michael when his memoir was published in 2012; we'll hear a hilarious excerpt from that conversation. Was J.S. Bach anti-Semitic? Should we perform music that reflects morally abhorrent ideas? Should aesthetic pleasure outweigh prejudice? These questions are at the heart of two new books. Michael talks to husband and wife Michael Marissen, author of Bach and God, and Lauren Belfer, author of And After the Fire. Music this week by: Django Reinhart, Charles Dutoit and the MSO, Paul Robeson, Tom Lehrer, Clint Eastwood (!), J.S. Bach, Jeanne Lamon, Glenn Gould, Isabel Bayrakdarian, Lighthouse, John Eliot Gardiner and Hilario Duran.

America's hypocrisy over Russia's cyber-interference in the presidential election - Michael's essay: Here's an excerpt: "The involvement by the United States in dictating and directing the political life of other countries has a long and sordid history going back to the middle of the 19th Century."

What links young men who join gangs in North America, to young men who join ISIS in Europe?  Law professor Jamil Jivani grew up in a tough neighbourhood near Toronto. He travelled to Molenbeek, the tough neighbourhood in Brussels where many of the Paris attackers grew up, to investigate the roots of anger, alienation and radicalization.

Music that changed your world: Listeners tell us about the music that affected them at critical moments in their lives. We'll hear their stories along with music from West Side Story, The Sorcerer's Apprentice, Paul Robeson, Tom Lehrer, Clint Eastwood singing in the musical Paint Your Wagon, and Lighthouse's big-band big hit, "One Fine Morning."

A book club for two, still going after 35 years — on the phone: Two friends. Two cities. With their very own read-aloud book club. A little War and Peace down the line? Alisa Siegel'sdocumentary is called, Telephone Books.
Stuart Hamilton: The renowned vocal coach, former "Saturday Afternoon at the Opera" host, and long-time contributor to the New York Metropolitan's opera quiz, died on New Year's Day at the age of 87. He talked to Michael when his memoir was published in 2012; we'll hear a hilarious excerpt from that conversation.

Was J.S. Bach anti-Semitic? Should we perform music that reflects morally abhorrent ideas? Should aesthetic pleasure outweigh prejudice? These questions are at the heart of two new books. Michael talks to husband and wife Michael Marissen, author of Bach and God, and Lauren Belfer, author of And After the Fire.

Music this week by: Django Reinhart, Charles Dutoit and the MSO, Paul Robeson, Tom Lehrer, Clint Eastwood (!), J.S. Bach, Jeanne Lamon, Glenn Gould, Isabel Bayrakdarian, Lighthouse, John Eliot Gardiner and Hilario Duran.

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