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The Sunday Magazine for February 5, 2023

Former Vancouver mayor Kennedy Stewart talks about B.C.'s drug decriminalization pilot, John Hendrickson reflects on living with a stutter, Tim Golden unpacks what the Genaro García Luna trial reveals about the war on drugs, our monthly brain game That's Puzzling! returns, and we discover the science behind musical taste.
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Former Vancouver mayor on B.C.'s drug decriminalization experiment

This past week, British Columbia began a three-year pilot program that decriminalizes possession of small amounts of some illicit drugs. Former Vancouver mayor Kennedy Stewart championed the policy while in office. He joins David Common to discuss why he thinks it's needed, how it could help, and what its limitations are.
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How Joe Biden helped John Hendrickson find peace with his stutter

In his new book, Life On Delay, John Hendrickson shares his personal journey navigating life with a stutter. He tells David Common that his viral 2019 article about Joe Biden's struggle with stuttering – and his reluctance to admit he might still be struggling – led him to reckon with his own experience.
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What Genaro García Luna's trial reveals about the war on drugs

Investigative journalist Tim Golden joins to David Common to unpack how the drug trafficking trial trial of Genaro García Luna is revealing decades of corruption, extortion and political interference from both Mexican and American officials that fueled the rise of Mexico's most infamous drug cartels – and by extension – the ongoing overdose crisis.
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That's Puzzling! for February 2023

In the latest round of The Sunday Magazine's monthly challenge That's Puzzling!, David Common competes against one familiar voice and one clever listener in a battle of brain games devised by puzzle master Peter Brown.
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How science can help explain why you love (and loathe) different kinds of music

Why does a Céline Dion ballad make one person’s heart go on, while it drives someone else to distraction? Susan Rogers says it's about more than just personal taste. The record producer-turned-neuroscientist reveals what's really going on in your brain when you listen to music.

The Sunday Magazine for January 29, 2023

Our Sunday Politics Panel looks forward to Parliament's return, Gogol Bordello's Eugene Hütz talks about showing solidarity with Ukraine through music, Robert Samuels explores questions raised following the Memphis police beating of Tyre Nichols, and former NHL player Akim Aliu shares his fight for inclusion in hockey.
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Why Akim Aliu doesn't shy away from hockey's harsh realities in new graphic memoir for kids

Akim Aliu is telling his life story in a new graphic memoir called Dreamer, which follows his journey from Nigeria to Ukraine to Canada, right up to the NHL. He joins Piya Chattopadhyay to talk about why the hockey's future depends on meaningful action towards inclusivity and accessibility for people from all walks of life.
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Musician Eugene Hütz flies the flag of Ukraine's cultural resistance

Eugene Hütz, frontman of the 'gypsy punk' band Gogol Bordello, speaks with Piya Chattopadhyay about spreading a message of solidarity with his home country of Ukraine through music.
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Sunday Politics Panel: Sizing up federal concerns as Parliament returns

With Parliament set to resume on Monday, journalist Paul Wells and Le Devoir columnist Emilie Nicolas join Piya Chattopadhyay to map out the landscape ahead for the new sitting, including the economy, health-care, party leaders, and the state of political discourse in Canada one year after the convoy protests.

Video of Tyre Nichols beating renews questions about police violence

On Friday, graphic video footage of the violent beating of Tyre Nichols by police in Memphis, Tenn. was made public, and quickly reverberated around the world. In the aftermath, questions are once again being raised about the policing of Black Americans. Piya Chattopadhyay is joined by Robert Samuels to explore some of them.

The Sunday Magazine for January 22, 2023

Niigaan Sinclair unpacks the $2.8-billion residential school settlement between the federal government and some First Nations, Walt Bogdanich shares what his investigation into McKinsey & Company revealed, journalist Chris Whipple evaluates Joe Biden at the half-way point in his term, and Bethany Brookshire reflects on why we label some animals 'pests.'

The original Bambi isn't kid's stuff — and it carries significant lessons for today

A new translation of the original text, published 100 years ago, hopes to reveal the complex — and, at times, much darker — story at its core.
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Canadians should be concerned about McKinsey contracts, says investigative journalist

Investigative journalist Walt Bogdanich sheds light on McKinsey & Company's history and controversies, following revelations that the consulting firm has been awarded more than $100 million in federal government contracts since 2015.
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Rethinking why we villainize rats, raccoons and squirrels

Squirrels, raccoons, and rats are all animals that many would describe as 'pests.' But science journalist Bethany Brookshire says our tendency to lump such creatures under that label reveals less about them and more about our own human species.
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Ottawa reaches a $2.8-billion settlement with hundreds of First Nations over harm caused by residential school

The federal government has reached a $2.8-billion agreement to settle a class-action lawsuit brought by hundreds of First Nations. It marks the first time Canada has compensated bands and communities for the collective harms related to residential schools. Professor and columnist Niigaan Sinclair joins Piya Chattopadhyay to unpack the significance of the deal.
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Biden presidency turns two amid classified documents controversy

On the two-year mark of Joe Biden's first term as U.S. president, journalist Chris Whipple breaks down Biden's political wins and losses so far, as criticisms of him mount over the discovery of classified documents at his home and private office.

The Sunday Magazine for January 15, 2023

Anthony Perl talks about what recent travel chaos reveals about transportation in Canada, Pico Iyer reflects on the meaning of paradise, Lily Kuo explores what's next for China as 'zero-COVID' ends and Lunar New Year travel begins, we share the story of the original Bambi, and Nora McInerny takes down 'toxic positivity.'

Feeling crambazzled? A linguist shares words from the past that are fitting for 2023

You might not know you are feeling crambazzled or that you have a case of the mubble-fubbles, but self-described linguistic magpie Susie Dent says putting a word to your feelings will actually help.
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Pico Iyer's pursuit of paradise

Almost every culture and religion around the world has some version of paradise. Travel writer Pico Iyer has spent decades thinking and writing about the concept. He joins Piya Chattopadhyay to discuss his new book, The Half Known Life: In Search of Paradise.
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What holiday travel turbulence illuminates about the broader transportation landscape in Canada

As Canadians demand accountability for the chaotic holiday travel season, Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with political science and urban studies professor Anthony Perl about what these recent problems reveal about Canada's broader transportation landscape, and what needs to be done to improve it moving forward.
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What's next for China as 'zero-COVID' ends and Lunar New Year travel begins

China has seen a massive outbreak of COVID-19 since it abruptly ended strict mitigation policies in December. Now, with millions expected to travel for the Lunar New Year holiday, there are fears it may spark another wave. The Washington Post's China bureau chief Lily Kuo unpacks this moment in the country.
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Bambi at 100: Not the Disney classic you thought you knew

The story of Bambi turns 100 this year. But as a new translation reveals, the original Bambi bears little relation to the classic Disney film. The story is a parable about the persecution of minority groups after the First World War. Translator Jack Zipes explains why he believes the novel still holds important lessons for our world today.
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Nora McInerny on rejecting 'toxic positivity' and her new book Bad Vibes Only

Between Instagram influencers suggesting you practice mindfulness to escape burnout and home decor that demands you have "good vibes only!"... it can feel like a bit much. Nora McInerney talks to Piya Chattopadhyay about her book of essays, Bad Vibes Only and how the "good vibes" ethos can sometimes leave us feeling worse off.

The Sunday Magazine for January 8, 2023

Catherine Belton examines Vladimir Putin's strategy and standing as the war in Ukraine continues, Susie Dent reflects on the power of finding the perfect word, David Remnick talks about how U.S. democracy has changed two years after the Jan. 6 attack, and our monthly brain game That's Puzzling! returns.

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