Spark

To protect privacy, there need to be limits on smart cities' surveillance

A panel at a security and privacy conference in Victoria, B.C., earlier this year, discusses how a smart city can be efficient, safe and open. Speakers include former Ontario Privacy Commissioner Ann Cavoukian, David Izzard, the Architecture & Cyber Security Manager for the City of Surrey, BC, and Andrew Clement, a member of the Waterfront Toronto Digital Strategy Advisory Board.

How do you balance security with freedom of movement?

How do smart cities keep people secure while also protecting their privacy? (Adam Killick/CBC)
Listen7:07

This story was originally published on April 26, 2019.

As technologies become more connected, and cities get "smarter," there is a question of balance: How do you protect individual privacy against the collection of important data required to operate a smart city?

It turns out, there are no easy answers to balancing security with freedom of movement.

Back in February, Victoria, BC hosted the 20th Annual Privacy and Security Conference.

One of the panels featured a discussion about how to balance freedom and security in a smart city.

Click "listen" above to hear part of that discussion. The voices you'll hear are those of Ann Cavoukian, the former privacy commissioner of Ontario, David Izzard, who is the Architecture & Cyber Security Manager for the City of Surrey, BC, and Andrew Clement, a member of the Waterfront Toronto Digital Strategy Advisory Board.