Spark

Spark 435

Cheese that's been exposed to music tastes different. The surprisingly political world of emoji. A plan to calculate the value of the digital services we get for free. Neural networks that power AI systems largely came from Canada.

Music-infused cheese, the politics of emoji, the monetary value of Gmail, and Canadian deep learning

Spark—champions of sound and cheese since 2007. (Adam Killick)
Listen to the full episode53:59

Cheese that's been exposed to music tastes different

One cheese wheel listened to "The Magic Flute". One to "Stairway to Heaven" and another got A Tribe Called Quest's "Jazz (We've Got)." Yet another cheese just hung out in silence. Swiss cheesemaker Beat Wampfler tells Spark host Nora Young why he played a 24-hour loop of music to wheels of cheese and whether it had an impact on the flavour.

The surprisingly political world of emoji

Martha Shane's new documentary, Picture Character, takes an in-depth look at the evolution of emojis (Japanese for "picture character"). Have smiling poops and heart-eyed faces become their own global language?

A plan to calculate the value of the digital services we get for free

A newstudyby MIT researchers puts a dollar value on all the free digital goods people use, and builds the case that online activity can and should become part of GDP — which doesn't include online services as part of a country's economic worth.

Neural networks that power AI systems largely came from Canada

Canada has become a centre for AI research thanks work being done here on neural networks, which use some of the ideas from neuroscience to help computers learn. Nora Young speaks to one of the biggest names behind these systems is Universite de Montreal professor Yoshua Bengio.

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