Spark

Digging into the food tech boom

Startup culture and design thinking is now being applied to the food industry. But do we really need technology to change the way we eat?
Samson Tam serves dinner to his EatWith guests, part of a sharing economy trend in "social dining". (EatWith.com)
Listen15:43

​There's a layer of digital technology that sits between our mouths and our food, and tech companies are driving it. The latest industry to get disrupted by digital technology is food. The promise is that by bringing startup culture and design thinking to the food industry, it can be more efficient, creative and responsive. But is technology really changing the way we eat? To help us sort through all this we hear from chef and entrepreneur Mike Lee. ​

Meet a man who invites complete strangers over for dinner

A growing number of tech companies want you to eat dinner in a stranger's home. Samson Tam is one of a handful of Canadians who opens his home (and kitchen) up on EatWith, a "social dining" web service. Sharing economy advisor April Rinne explains the legal and regulatory challenges these social dining services present.

Why go to a high-end restaurant when it can come to you?

New Yorker Ben Reininga tell us about how he loves Maple, which offers gourmet food delivery through an app. It's just one of many services aiming to provide restaurant food without having a physical restaurant.

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