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Video game live-streaming

Websites where you can watch other people play video games have really taken off in the past few years. The biggest example is Twitch, where each month, 45 million people watch 13 billion minutes of gaming, making it the the fourth-highest traffic site in the U.S after Netflix, Google, and Apple. M.I.T researcher T.L. Taylor explains the rise of video...

Websites where you can watch other people play video games have really taken off in the past few years. The biggest example is Twitch, where each month, 45 million people watch 13 billion minutes of gaming, making it the the fourth-highest traffic site in the U.S after Netflix, Google, and Apple. M.I.T researcher T.L. Taylor explains the rise of video game spectating, and what it says about the future of media consumption.

<!--START T.L Taylor on live-stream video games AUDIO HERE --> <div class="clear"></div> <!--END T.L Taylor on live-stream video games AUDIO --> <ul> <li>T.L.'s book: <a href="http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/raising-stakes">Raising the Stakes: E-Sports and the Professionalization of Computer Gaming</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.twitch.tv/">Twitch.tv</a></li> </ul>

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