Hear 3 bonus scenes from Season 3: Dee & Moore

Here’s a small example of what was left on the cutting room floor.

After a 13-year investigation, which resulted in well over 500 hours of recorded material and thousands of documents, there is still much that didn't make it into Season 3: Dee & Moore. Some scenes had to be cut short or removed altogether, and some voices were left out in the interest of telling a clearer-paced, compelling story.

Here's a small example of what was left on the cutting room floor.


The Bridge

(David Ridgen/CBC)
During the Grand Jury, while on the way to visit Meadville with Dunn Lampton, Thomas sees a derelict bridge, which reminds him of a memory he has of his brother. Later, David and Thomas visit that bridge and Thomas gives a more detailed recollection. 3:38

Who's speaking?

Thomas Moore

What's it about?

An extended story of the bridge mentioned in Episode 5

Why do we want listeners to hear it?

During the Grand Jury in September 1996, while on the way to visit Meadville with Dunn Lampton, Thomas sees a derelict bridge, which reminds him of a memory he has of his brother. Later, David and Thomas visit that bridge and Thomas recounts a more detailed recollection. We felt the long version of the story didn't fit within the pacing of the episode.


The Briggs Ledger

(David Ridgen/CBC)
Reverend Clyde Briggs' son Ishmael searched his dad's papers and made a shocking discovery that would ultimately help put James Ford Seale in prison. 5:53

Who's speaking?

Ishmael Briggs

What's it about?

The discovery of Reverend Clyde Briggs' ledger

Why do we want listeners to hear it?

When Charles Marcus Edwards confessed his role in the Dee & Moore murders to Dunn Lampton, he mentioned searching for guns at the Roxie Baptist Church. The preacher at this church, the Reverend Clyde Briggs, died in the 1960s. But his son Ishmael Briggs, after talking to David and Thomas about the Dee and Moore murders, searched his dad's papers and made an important discovery that would ultimately help the prosecution to corroborate Edwards's story in court.


Mississippi Local

(David Ridgen/CBC)
It's not hard to find locals in Mississippi who have stories about the Klan's reign of terror in the 1960s. Marianne King was a white woman who ran a dry cleaning and laundry shop in Meadville. She employed many black workers, which angered the Klan. 2:13

Who's speaking?

Marian King

What's it about?

The Ku Klux Klan's reign of terror in Mississippi

Why do we want listeners to hear it?

Many Mississippians, white and black, have stories about the Klan's reign of terror in the 1960s. Marian King was a white woman who ran a dry cleaning and laundry shop in Meadville. She employed many black workers, which angered the Klan.