Quirks & Quarkswith Bob McDonald

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Tiny people have evolved in rainforests because it's where tiny steps are better

Tall people are much less efficient when moving through the jungle

An asteroid impact on Greenland left a massive crater under the ice

It's 31-km wide, and might have hit as recently as 12,000 years ago

Mitigating flood risks in your own backyard

A new report details ways local communities can boost their resiliency to extreme weather events
Bob McDonald's blog

Mitigating flood risks in your own backyard

A new report details ways local communities can boost their resiliency to extreme weather events

The mysteries of animal movement — how they walk on water and climb up walls

Researcher and writer David Hu looks at all the things animals can do and how we can copy them

What are the major visible changes in the night sky in the last 3,000 years?

In the past 3,000 years, the rotational axis of the Earth has shifted, and that has changed the position of the pole star and the constellations.

How moths evolved a kind of stealth jet technology to sneak past bats

Moth wings have special scales that absorb sonar emitted by hunting bats

Will coral reef islands rise or fall? It's a greenhouse-gas paradox

Coral reef islands like those in Kiribati or the Maldives may actually benefit from rising sea levels, provided the coral is healthy

Nov. 17, 2018: Greenland asteroid impact, short people in the rain-forest, reef islands and sea level and more

Stealth moths, walking on water and climbing the walls and is the night sky changing?

Will coral reef islands rise or fall? It's a greenhouse-gas paradox

Coral reef islands like those in Kiribati or the Maldives may actually benefit from rising sea levels, provided the coral is healthy

Barking piranhas & screeching catfish are the sounds of the Amazon River

In the Amazon river, a scientist is eavesdropping on Piranha calls to figure out better ways to keep tabs on the ferocious fish.

Bitcoin mining uses more energy than mining for real gold

Worldwide mining for Bitcoin is consuming as much energy as the country of Denmark

Wind farms in India are driving a population boom of skinny, fearless lizards

Wind farms provide a cleaner energy alternative to burning fossil fuels, but new research has found that they might also make an unexpected impact on surrounding wildlife.

Robotic explorers lasting well past their warranty

If only cars would run as well as NASA's intrepid robotic explorers like Opportunity, Dawn, and the Kepler Space Telescope

For 20 years, scientists have been chucking fish into the forest. Here's why

For 20 years, scientists have been tossing hundreds of thousands of dead fish into the woods to understand how salmon carcasses feed the forest

The race to discover new species in Canada's Rockies before they're gone

Leaving no stone unturned as scientists establish a baseline for further studies

Aged chocolate: Archaeologists find evidence of 5000 year old chocolate drink

Archaeological evidence suggests chocolate originated in the Amazon over 5,000 years ago, much earlier than previously thought.

The 'Trump of the Tropics' is now in charge of the lungs of the planet. Here's why that's scary

Brazil's new president wants to invigorate Brazil's economy by relaxing environmental laws and this could threaten the world's largest rainforest — the Amazon.

Barking piranhas and screeching catfish are the sounds of the Amazon River

In the Amazon river, a scientist is eavesdropping on Piranha calls to figure out better ways to keep tabs on the ferocious fish.

For 20 years, scientists have been chucking fish into the forest. Here's why

For 20 years, scientists have been tossing hundreds of thousands of dead fish into the woods to understand how salmon carcasses feed the forest

Sniffing your way around — our brains are built to navigate by scent

Researchers have found that those who can smell well, navigate well too

For 20 years, scientists have been chucking fish into the forest. Here's why

For 20 years, scientists have been tossing hundreds of thousands of dead fish into the woods to understand how salmon carcasses feed the forest

Barking piranhas and screeching catfish are the sounds of the Amazon River

In the Amazon river, a scientist is eavesdropping on Piranha calls to figure out better ways to keep tabs on the ferocious fish.

Why does humidity make us feel hotter in the summer and colder in winter?

Dr. Deepak Chandon from the University of Toronto has the answer.

Sniffing your way around — our brains are built to navigate by scent

Researchers have found that those who can smell well, navigate well too