Quirks & Quarkswith Bob McDonald

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August 17, 2019 — The benefits of video games, composting corpses, brewing ancient beer and more

Right whales in the wrong place and supernovas and bipedalism

Right whales were in the wrong place because of the wrong climate

Warming water in their traditional habitat led to a collapse in their favourite prey

Drink like an Egyptian: 5000-year-old yeast is resurrected to brew ancient beer

Researchers brewed five kinds of beer, and report the Philistine brew was best

Video games aren't corrupting young minds — they may be building them

New science suggests that video games are rarely addictive, and they can help with social and intellectual development — and possibly even mental health.

Don't bury or cremate — soon you may compost your corpse

'This soil can then be used to grow new life. Eventually you could be a lemon tree'

Did our ancestors evolve to walk upright because of exploding stars?

Cosmic rays from supernovae might have destroyed forests and forced us up onto two legs

August 10, 2019 — The Quirks & Quarks Listener Question show

Does climate change cause earthquakes? Why is it blurry underwater? Do animals do math? To start the new year we present another edition of our ever-popular Listener Question Show, where we find the experts to answer your questions.

'The sky is not the limit': How the Apollo 11 mission inspired generations of scientists

To mark the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission, Quirks & Quarks spoke to Canadian astronauts and a variety of scientists from all disciplines about the moon landing’s legacy and how it inspired them to push the boundaries of human knowledge and achievement.

August 3, 2019 — Science of awe, blue whales and sonar, chromosomes and sleep and more

Ancient aquaculture on the west coast and dogs and human sperm quality

Exploring the powerful emotion of awe: How it can be awe-some and aw-ful

Awe is one of the most powerful human emotions we can experience. Research to understand it is showing how it has the potential to open our minds to bring us together or be used as a tool for manipulation.

Military sonar puts blue whales off their feed

Researchers studying the impact of military sonar on blue whales have found that it can disrupt their foraging at times that might be particularly important for the giant cetaceans.

Your brain may need sleep to repair DNA 'potholes'

A team of Israeli researchers has found that one of the reasons that sleep could be so important to animals — including humans — is that it takes neurons 'offline' so DNA damage accumulated during waking hours can be repaired.

Man and man's best friend have both been experiencing declines in sperm quality

Researchers in the U.K. have found a link between the fertility declines in domestic male dogs and similar problems that have been widely reported in human males.

Clam gardens have been cultivated by Indigenous people for millennia

Clam gardens have existed for a long time on the west coast of Canada, but until now, we haven't known for how long. Now, a team of Canadian archaeologists, using carbon dating, found that the gardens have existed for at least 3,500 years.

July 27, 2019 - Shopping for souvenirs on an asteroid, new Cambrian explosion fossils and more

Why we can say ‘f’ words, green icebergs from Antarctica and the length of a dream

How your gut bacteria influences your behaviour, emotions and thinking

Our gut bacteria can profoundly affect the way our brains work. Scientific research in recent years is starting to hint that our gut bacteria, known as our microbiome, is an active participant in our emotions, how we think and even how we behave.

'Weird wonders' in China: Half-billion year-old fossils from the dawn of animal life unearthed

A newly discovered fossil site in China is a treasure trove for paleontologists studying the Cambrian explosion, when life on Earth suddenly and massively expanded in diversity about 550 million years ago.

Our farming ancestors are the reason we can say 'f' words today

An international team of scientists discovered that labiodental sounds such as "f" and "v," made by touching the lower lip to the upper teeth, are a relatively recent development in human speech.

Mysterious green icebergs from Antarctica might be fertilizing the southern ocean

Scientists think they've finally figured out why some icebergs around Antarctica take on a vivid green hue rather than the blueish snowy white colour that we all appreciate.

How long does it take to dream a dream?

Research scientist Lisa Turner explains that while dreams seem continuous, they are actually broken down into stages and interrupted as the brain moves through various parts of the sleep cycle.

A Japanese spacecraft visits an asteroid — and will bring back a souvenir

Samples from the asteroid Ryugu may help scientists learn more about the ingredients for life available in the early solar system.

Bitcoin's energy costs, beatboxers invent new sounds, wind farms change lizards and more

Chucking salmon for science, piranha barking, smells and mapping, and heat and humidity.

Bitcoin mining uses more energy than mining for real gold

Worldwide mining for Bitcoin is consuming as much energy as the country of Denmark

Beatboxers have invented whole new ways of making sounds, scientists say

In an MRI study of five beatboxers, researchers found unprecedented patterns of movement

Wind farms in India are driving a population boom of skinny, fearless lizards

Wind farms provide a cleaner energy alternative to burning fossil fuels, but new research has found that they might also make an unexpected impact on surrounding wildlife.

August 17, 2019 — The benefits of video games, composting corpses, brewing ancient beer and more

Right whales in the wrong place and supernovas and bipedalism

Video games aren't corrupting young minds — they may be building them

New science suggests that video games are rarely addictive, and they can help with social and intellectual development — and possibly even mental health.

Don't bury or cremate — soon you may compost your corpse

'This soil can then be used to grow new life. Eventually you could be a lemon tree'

Drink like an Egyptian: 5000-year-old yeast is resurrected to brew ancient beer

Researchers brewed five kinds of beer, and report the Philistine brew was best

Right whales were in the wrong place because of the wrong climate

Warming water in their traditional habitat led to a collapse in their favourite prey

Did our ancestors evolve to walk upright because of exploding stars?

Cosmic rays from supernovae might have destroyed forests and forced us up onto two legs