Q

Young, queer and Arab: Palestinian musician Bashar Murad wants to be understood for who he actually is

Palestinian musician Bashar Murad makes music to address the gender inequities and homophobia he and others face at home but also to give the rest of the world a better understanding of Palestinian people.
Bashar Murad with host Tom Power in the q studio in Toronto, Ont. (Vivian Rashotte/CBC)
Listen12:49

Palestinian musician Bashar Murad makes music to address the gender inequities and homophobia he and others face at home but also to give the rest of the world a better understanding of musicians living in the Palestinian Territories. 

Last week some of Canada's music makers and shakers gathered for Canadian Music Week, and while CMW is always a good time to reflect on the state of this country's music industry, we also realized we cover that year round anyway. Which is why one of this year's CMW panels caught our attention. It was called Discover the Music On The Other Side of The Wall and it focused on the Palestinian music scene -- a scene we rarely hear about on this side of the world.

Bashar Murad is someone who's artistic motivation is inspired by his own journey to be seen, heard and understood for who he actually is: a young, queer Arab man.

Bashar stopped by last week before his CMW panel to talk about that journey.

Take a listen.

Note: In the segment, Murad refers to "Palestine." Our  CBC Language policy, states there is no modern country of Palestine, although there's a movement to establish one as part of a two-state peace agreement with Israel. Areas under the control of the Palestinian Authority are considered Palestinian territories: Fatah-run West Bank and Hamas-run Gaza Strip.

Produced by ​Tyrone Callender

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