Q

Why the author of Friday Black thinks his book is the dystopian satire we need

Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah's debut collection of stories is about race and class, as well as love and the reckoning that comes with our life decisions. He joins guest host Saroja Coelho to chat about his sudden rise and the themes in his work.
Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah's debut story collection is called Friday Black and it's out now. (Limitless Entertainment/Mariner Books)
Listen19:45

The New York Times has called Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenyah's debut collection of stories "powerful and important and strange and beautiful." His writing is being compared to George Saunders, one of the most acclaimed fiction writers alive, and Roxanne Gay, who's easily one of the most powerful voices of her generation. Gay's review can be summed up in a three-word quote: "read this book."

The book in question is called Friday Black and it's about race, class and code-switching. It also asks us to think about consumerism, justice and the kind of world we want to create, as well as love and the reckoning that comes with our life decisions.

Adjei-Brenyah spoke with guest host Saroja Coelho to chat about his sudden rise, the themes in his work and how he categorizes a book as far-reaching as Friday Black.

Produced by ​Tyrone Callender


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