Q

'I couldn't imagine I'd be here 60 years later': How Françoise Hardy became a French icon despite self-doubt

In a rare English interview, Françoise Hardy looks back on her early doubtful days, clears up some rumours about her past and tells an unbelievable story about Bob Dylan.
Françoise Hardy's new memoir The Despair of Monkeys and Other Trifles is available in English now. (Warner Records)
Listen18:58

When Françoise Hardy was a teenager in the late 1950s, her father gifted her a guitar. As soon as she learned a couple chords, she began writing three to four songs a week alone in her bedroom. Wondering if she was any good, she went to an open audition at a record label. A part of her wanted them to confirm her worst suspicions and tell her she should give up, but they didn't, and a few months later she had a worldwide hit in France. 

This is one of the stories Hardy tells in her new memoir, The Despair of Monkeys and Other Trifles, which is now available in English. Hardy is known today as a defining figure in French music, who's worked with big names like Serge Gainsbourg, Leonard Cohen and Iggy Pop. 

In a rare English interview with q's Tom Power, Hardy looks back on her early doubtful days, clears up some rumours about her past and tells an unbelievable story about Bob Dylan.

Produced by Chris Trowbridge

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