Q

Future Islands challenge fans to be open and vulnerable with their music

Baltimore band Future Islands are back with a new album called The Far Field. They stopped by q to perform some songs and discuss the vulnerability in their music.
Baltimore band Future Islands and Tom Power in the q studios in Toronto, Ont. (Cathy Irving/CBC)

Future Islands became a viral sensation in 2014, when they performed on The Late Show With David Letterman. While many latched on to singer Samuel T. Herring's memorable moves, Herring has a more exact theory as to why that became their launching pad. 

"It was very polarizing," he explains. "That genuine expression was shocking to a lot of people because, the way social media is, we can feel very connected to people but we're not actually. Something we're challenging is an openness and vulnerability in our shows, bringing people in to be open with themselves and with others."

This works both for fans and the band, who admittedly give everything they've got in every performance. "You sing those songs and people take them into their lives and it gives them solace," Herring continues. "If we're drained, we've given everything we can and it's worth it." 

Future Islands are back with a new album this month entitled The Far Field (out April 7) and they stop by the q studios today to perform some songs and discuss the recording process behind their latest record. 

Below are photos from their q session: 

Future Islands' Samuel T. Herring performing live in the q studios in Toronto, Ont. (Cathy Irving/CBC)
Future Islands' Samuel T. Herring performing live in the q studios in Toronto, Ont. (Cathy Irving/CBC)
Future Islands bassist William Cashion performing live in the q studios in Toronto, Ont. (Cathy Irving/CBC)
Future Islands keyboardist Gerrit Welmers performing live in the q studios in Toronto, Ont. (Cathy Irving/CBC)
Future Islands' drummer Michael Lowry performing live in the q studios in Toronto, Ont. (Cathy Irving/CBC)

— Daemon Fairless

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