Trolls for hire: Why are Russians being paid to wreak havoc online?

Journalist Adrian Chen joins Shad to discuss his reporting on an alleged "pro-Kremlin troll farm" in St. Petersburg.
Modern-day trolls don't live under bridges -- they work in ordinary buildings like this one in St. Petersburg. (Adrian Chen)

Journalist Adrian Chen joins Shad to discuss his reporting on an alleged "pro-Kremlin troll farm" in St. Petersburg, staffed by a largely young group of Russians who spread online hoaxes, strong opinions and misinformation.

The goal, says Chen, is to promote Russian President Vladimir Putin and otherwise muddy the waters. He outlines the impact the paid commenters have had so far, what their daily work consists of, and how he's been singled out personally as a result of this story. 

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