Daniel Levitin warns you not to trust your gut online

For neuroscientist Daniel Levitin, critical thinking skills are imperative for navigating the influx and sensationalism in this information age.
For neuroscientist Daniel Levitin our tendency to believe the things we see in the media is problematic because it values immediacy over accuracy. By observing breaking news coverage and the consumption of it Levitin was confronted with how vital exercising critical thinking is. So he wrote a book about it - A Field Guide to Lies: Critical Thinking in the Information Age. He joins guest host Candy Palmater to give her the tips and tricks to staying informed while also staying critical. 18:36
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Daniel Levitin worries about our tendency to believe the media. Or rather, our unchecked and uncritical consumption of it.

Gone are the days of the newspaper of record and journalists acting as authenticity gatekeepers. In it's place are tabloids that value immediacy over accuracy. 

His new book, A Field Guide to Lies: Critical Thinking in the Information Age examines breaking news coverage, exposes its fault lines and provides tools to navigate through the sensational hogwash.

First of all, don't trust your gut. Second, be humble. And finally, always remember "you're entitled your own opinions but you're not entitled to your own facts," he tells guest host Candy Palmater.

WEB EXTRA | Need help cutting through all the bs? Here are some of our highlights from A Field Guide to Lies guide to get you through.

Information overload? We've distilled some of Daniel Levitin's tips, tricks, theories and thoughts into this little guide but this is just the tip of the A Field Guide to Lies: Critical Thinking in the Information Age iceberg. (TK Matunda/CBC)
For neuroscientist Daniel Levitin, critical thinking skills are imperative for navigating the influx and sensationalism in this information age. (Arsenio Corôa)

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