Q

Moby on Porcelain and finding compassion for your younger self

Moby tells his personal origin story in a new memoir laced with panic, self loathing and clear-eyed sobriety.
During the musically transformative 90s, Moby was going through a transformation of his own. As the serious, sober Christian struggled to make it as a DJ in the burgeoning New York club scene, he could scarcely imagine the future ahead of him. Today he joins Shad to discuss "Porcelain" his painfully honest memoir that looks into his life as a young artist. 22:48
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During the musically transformative 90s, a young DJ named Moby was going through a transformation of his own. As the serious, sober Christian struggled to make it in the burgeoning New York club scene, he could scarcely imagine the future ahead of him.

Moby's new memoir, Porcelain, revisits that beautifully chaotic time. 

Moby stops by studio q to discuss his eye-opening new memoir, Porcelain. (Ben Shannon/CBC)


"One of the odder things is that it made perfect sense to me," says Moby. "​I'd be teaching bible studies during the day, and DJing at sex clubs during the night — and somehow it just made sense."

The artist writes of panic, self loathing and staying sober despite tremendous loss, including a major album flop and the death of his mother. Today he joins Shad to discuss his painfully honest look into his life as a young artist, the value of the midlife memoir, and the compassion he's found for his younger self. 

"The things that you want and the things you believe are gonna make you happy, rarely do. And the things that you avoid and think are gonna make you miserable, sometimes are a lot more complicated and can actually make you happy."

Moby poses with our q illustration of him, inked by CBC Radio's own Ben Shannon. (Fabiola Carletti/CBC)

WEB EXTRA | Porcelain shares its title with Moby's sixth single from Play (1999). The melancholy break up song is one of the musician's most memorable. 

 

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