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Exactitudes photo series challenges notion of "personal style"

Dutch photographer Ari Versluis and collaborator Ellie Uyttenbroek are convinced that no matter how uniquely you think you dress, you're part of a group.
Ari Versluis chronicles the "Gabbers" look in Rotterdam, 1994. (Ari Versluis)

No one has a unique fashion style. That's the conclusion reached by Dutch photographer Ari Versluis and collaborator Ellie Uyttenbroek after 21 years of documenting street style around the world. 

In their photo series Exactitudes, Versluis and Uyttenbroek build their case with photographic evidence. Stacking row after row of similarly-dressed people, the artists aim to prove that no matter how uniquely you think you dress, you're probably part of a larger group. 

Ari Versluis chronicles the "United Americans" look in Amsterdam (or perhaps "dadcore"?) (Ari Versluis)
Ari Versluis chronicles the "sapeurs" look in Paris, 2008 (Ari Versluis)
Ari Versluis chronicles the "bimbos" look in Rotterdam, 2009. (Ari Versluis)
Ari Versluis chronicles the "farmcore" look in Amsterdam. (Ari Versluis)

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