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Why Ismail Saidi is joking about Muslim radicalization

Belgian writer Ismail Saidi has taken a controversial, comic approach to exploring one of his nation's most troubling realities.
Belgian writer Ismail Saidi poses at théâtre Saint-Michel in Bruxelles. (djihadspectacle.com)
Listen17:23

Ismail Saidi has taken a controversial, comic approach to exploring one of his nation's most troubling realities: young Muslim men swearing allegiance to ISIS and its terrorist tactics.

Today the Belgian writer joins Shad to discuss his play Djihad and the power of comedy to provoke and inspire discussions about radicalization. 

Saidi says attempts to radicalize Muslim youth are far from new, and recalls being approached as a teenager. He still wonders why young men just like him turn into murderers. 

"The kids are afraid now, and we try to kill the fear. That's our job with art," he says, adding that education and art are the only answer. 

WEB EXTRA | Although there is no English preview of the show, this French report offers a glimpse at the production.

 
 

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