Q

How Hollywood changes movies to avoid Chinese censorship

Reuters reporter Lisa Richwine discusses the growing tension between Chinese censors and the way that North American entertainment is created for Chinese audiences.
The South Park episode 'Band in China' was released on Oct. 2 and critiqued China's policies on free speech and Hollywood's efforts to abide by censorship in China. (Comedy Central/Much)
Listen11:29

Earlier this month, Chinese censors banned South Park from streaming services and social media sites because of an episode called "Band in China," which poked fun at Hollywood's attempts to avoid Chinese censorship by self-censoring its own content.

In response, the creators of South Park issued a tongue-in-cheek apology, but not everyone is willing to give the proverbial finger to the Chinese government and there are some compelling reasons why.

Reuters reporter Lisa Richwine joined q's Tom Power live from Los Angeles to talk about the growing tension between Chinese censors and the way that North American entertainment is created for Chinese audiences.


Click the 'Listen' link above to hear the full conversation with Lisa Richwine.

— Produced by ​Cora Nijhawan

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