Q

From Pink Floyd to Peter Gabriel, producer Bob Ezrin on the highlights of his career

In a career spanning nearly 50 years, Ezrin has been just as close to the heartbeat of the music as the musicians themselves. He takes us through the biggest moments of his unbelievable career.
In a career spanning nearly 50 years, Canadian record producer Bob Ezrin has been just as close to the heartbeat of the music as the musicians themselves. He's produced huge albums, like Pink Floyd's The Wall, wrangled some of the most colourful and challenging personalities in classic rock, travelled all over the continent and earned a spot in the Canadian Music Hall of Fame. In that time, he's worked on major records with Lou Reed, U2, Kiss, Nine Inch Nails, Peter Gabriel, Alice Cooper and many more. Ezrin joined host Tom Power in the q studio to take us through the highlights of his unbelievable career, including one of the most notoriously troubled recording sessions ever with Pink Floyd, why his first gig as a producer for Alice Cooper "was like stepping into a Hieronymus Bosch painting," and why he once duct taped Peter Gabriel to a pillar. 13:18
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Originally published on May 23, 2019

When you've produced some of the biggest names in rock 'n' roll history, every record comes with its own set of surprises.

In a career spanning nearly 50 years, Canadian record producer Bob Ezrin has been just as close to the heartbeat of the music as the musicians themselves. He's produced huge albums, like Pink Floyd's The Wall, wrangled some of the most colourful and challenging personalities in classic rock, travelled all over the continent and earned a spot in the Canadian Music Hall of Fame. In that time, he's worked on major records with Lou Reed, U2, Kiss, Nine Inch Nails, Peter Gabriel, Alice Cooper and many more.

Bob Ezrin in the q studio in Toronto. (Vivian Rashotte/CBC)

Ezrin joined host Tom Power in the q studio to take us through the highlights of his unbelievable career, including one of the most notoriously troubled recording sessions ever with Pink Floyd, why his first gig as a producer for Alice Cooper "was like stepping into a Hieronymus Bosch painting," and why he once duct taped Peter Gabriel to a pillar.

— Produced by Frank Lockyer Palmer

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