Q

Amanda Palmer tackles abortion, miscarriage and suicide on new 'unapologetically balls-out' feminist album

Singer, songwriter and provocateur Amanda Palmer talks about her personal new record and performs some stripped-down versions of her songs at the grand piano.
Singer, songwriter and provocateur Amanda Palmer talks about her personal new record, There Will Be No Intermission. 22:45
Listen31:04

Originally published on March 8, 2019

Singer, songwriter and provocateur Amanda Palmer has no problem telling you exactly what she's feeling, even when it's difficult, personal and painful.

On her new album, There Will Be No Intermission, she delves into her best friend's death, a miscarriage and her ex's suicide.

Palmer stopped by the q studio to talk about the record and perform some stripped-down versions of her songs at the grand piano. She started with something incredibly powerful: a song she'd been trying to write for years, but couldn't get right until she happened to be in Ireland as the country was voting to legalize abortion. 

Amanda Palmer with host Tom Power in the q studio in Toronto, Ont. (Vivian Rashotte/CBC)

She sat down with host Tom Power to share some of the stories behind the songs on her new album — some of her most personal work ever — and to talk about the emotional toll it takes when you reveal so much of yourself.

Palmer will be performing in Toronto on March 22 and in Montreal on March 23. There Will Be No Intermission is out now.

Watch Palmer's performances, recorded live in the q studio, below.

Amanda Palmer performs Voicemail For Jill, recorded live in the q studio. 5:44
Amanda Palmer performs Drowning In The Sound, recorded live in the q studio. 6:16

Download our podcast or click 'Listen' near the top of this page to hear the full interview with Amanda Palmer.

Produced by Mitch Pollock

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