Q

Cathy Guisewite on her popular comic strip Cathy and why it's just as relevant now as it was in 1976

When the comic strip Cathy was first published in 1976, it was groundbreakingly feminist. Guisewite, the creator of the comic, explains why she thinks the pressures on women today make the comic just as relevant in 2019.
Cathy Guisewite's new book is called Fifty Things That Aren't My Fault: Essays from the Grown-up Years. (Douglas Kirkland, Penguin Random House Canada)
Listen16:48

When the comic strip Cathy was first published in 1976, it was groundbreakingly feminist. Cathy was shedding light on the struggles of single, working women long before Bridget Jones started her diary or Carrie Bradshaw wrote her Sex and the City column. But by the time the comic ended in 2010, some critics felt it was pushing stereotypes rather than advancing women.

The creator of Cathy, Cathy Guisewite, joined q's Tom Power to explain why she thinks the pressures on women today make the comic just as relevant in 2019 as it was in 1976.

She's recently published a new book of essays, called Fifty Things That Aren't My Fault, and it's out now.

Produced by ​Diane Eros

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