Q

Canadian artist Rajni Perera on how science fiction influences her work

Perera discusses why depicting black and brown women is so central to her practice, and why the Canadian art market can be a tough nut to crack.
Canadian artist Rajni Perera. (Cory Van Der Ploeg)
Listen15:02

Rajni Perera is a Canadian visual artist who makes paintings, sculptures and installations that are inspired by science fiction. In her work, Perera imagines a future reality in which black and brown immigrants, dressed in the clothing of their ancestors, are at the centre.

The artist joined host Tom Power in the q studio to talk about the use of Buddhist and Hindu religious symbolism in her work, why depicting black and brown women is so central to her practice, and why the Canadian art market can be a tough nut to crack.

If you're in Regina, you can see Perera's exhibition Banners for new Empires at the MacKenzie Art Gallery now until Sunday, Feb. 23. She has another exhibition opening at the The Robert McLaughlin Gallery in Oshawa, Ont., next month. It's called Made of HoneyGold, and Marigold and it's on from Saturday, Feb. 1 to Sunday, April 19.

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