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Watch Frances McDormand's powerhouse Oscar speech

"Look around ladies and gentlemen, because we all have stories to tell and projects we need financed."

"Look around ladies and gentlemen, because we all have stories to tell and projects we need financed."

"Look around ladies and gentlemen, because we all have stories to tell and projects we need financed," said McDormand after getting all of the female Oscar nominees to stand. (Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images)

The #MeToo and #TimesUp movements didn't have the same presence at the Oscars as they did at this year's Golden Globe Awards, but actress Frances McDormand brought gender equality front and centre in her powerhouse Oscars speech. 

McDormand picked up the best actress Oscar for her role in Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, and when she took the stage, she thanked director Martin McDonagh, her sister, her husband Joel Coen and their son. "I know you are proud of me," she said, "and that fills me with everlasting joy."

But then McDormand got down to business. The veteran actress set her Oscar on the floor, gave it a pat on the head, and said, "Now I want to get some perspective."

First she called on all of the female nominees to stand up. "The actors — Meryl, you do it and everybody else will," she said, coaxing Meryl Streep to stand up, which she did enthusiastically.

"Come on. The filmmakers, the producers, the directors, the writers, the cinematographer, the composers, the songwriters, the designers," she said as the female nominees rose to their feet.

"Ok, look around, ladies and gentlemen, because we all have stories to tell and projects we need financed," she said firmly. "Don't talk to us about it at the parties tonight. Invite us into your office in a couple days, or you can come to ours, whichever suits you best, and we'll tell you all about them."

McDormand then closed by referring to a type of clause in a film contract that would demand a certain level of diversity within the cast and crew. "I have two words to leave with you tonight," she said. "Ladies and gentlemen: inclusion rider."

Watch her full speech here:

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