Q

Anupam Kher opens up about his personal connection to Hotel Mumbai

The award-winning actor and Bollywood star has appeared in more than 500 films and counting, but he says his latest film is one of his most important roles yet.
Anupam Kher with guest host Ali Hassan in the q studio in Toronto, Ont. (Vivian Rashotte/CBC)
Listen18:33

In November of 2008, over the course of four harrowing days, 10 Pakistani men linked to the terrorist organization Lashkar-e-Taiba carried out a series of coordinated sieges across several locations in Mumbai.

The attacks resulted in the deaths of 164 people, including two Canadians. To this day, it's considered one of the most tragic events in India's recent history.

Hotel Mumbai is a new film about those attacks. It focuses on the courageous staff of the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel, who risked their lives to protect the many patrons trapped inside.

The film stars Dev Patel, Armie Hammer and Bollwood legend Anupam Kher, who you may recognize from Hollywood blockbusters like Silver Linings Playbook, Bend It Like Beckham and The Big Sick.

Kher has appeared in more than 500 films and counting, but even with all those achievements, the award-winning actor and comedian sees this latest film as being one of his most important roles yet.

He joined guest host Ali Hassan in the q studio to tell us more about his personal connection to Hotel Mumbai and why he thinks it's important to depict terrorism on screen.

Anupam Kher poses with guest host Ali Hassan in the q studio in Toronto, Ont. (Vivian Rashotte/CBC)

Hotel Mumbai opens in the U.S. this week and hits theatres in Canada on March 29.

Click 'listen' near the top of this page to hear the full interview.

Produced by Tyrone Callender

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