Q

5 women who made a lasting impression on Shad

International Women's Day: Many brilliant women have shared their perspectives on q. Here are just five that stood out to our host.
Yes, Buffy Sainte-Marie spoke to Shad about her latest album — but she also shared her thoughts on activism, justice, and missing and murdered aboriginal women. (Fabiola Carletti/CBC)

Many brilliant, fascinating women have shared their passions and perspectives on q. For International Women's Day, Shad highlights five conversations that especially resonated with him. 


1) Mavis Staples

"Mavis told incredible stories about the civil rights movement and the role music can play in buoying revolution." Shad

Mavis Staples says that as long as she has a voice, she'll use it. (Miguel Vidal/Reuters)

Mavis Staples on crafting a soundtrack for the civil rights era: In a special two-part interview, Mavis Staples joins Shad to discuss her decades-long career, her family's role in the civil rights movement and why — in the aftermath of Ferguson — we must collectively heed the lessons of history. 


2) Buffy Sainte-Marie

"Buffy brought tremendous energy and intelligence. I especially appreciated her passion for her community." — Shad

Maysoon Zayid jokes that she has 99 problems, and cerebral palsy's just one. The pioneering Muslim-American comic uses humour as a way to connect audiences with the experience of people like her — people perceived as different. She joins Shad to discuss her witty defiance of social limits and conventions, how she handles online haters (hint: "mock him and block him") and why she believes only people with disabilities should play disabled characters on TV and in the movies. 22:17
 
Why Buffy Sainte-Marie doesn't believe in burning out: In a wide-ranging and energized conversation, Buffy Sainte-Marie joins Shad to discuss over 50 years of activism and envelope-pushing, the importance of play, and why indigenous artists are cracking the mainstream in unprecedented ways.

3) Maysoon Zayid

"Maysoon was so generous in sharing her unique experiences — and she was just a whirlwind of humour and great storytelling." — Shad

Patti Smith is a writer, a poet, a musician, an artist, a world traveller and a visionary. She joins Shad to discuss her latest memoir "M Train", a book that takes the reader through her life, her memories, her creative impulses, and her surprising passions. 22:20

​Maysoon Zayid isn't trying to 'inspire' youMaysoon Zayid jokes that she has 99 problems, and cerebral palsy's just one. The pioneering Muslim-American comic uses humour as a way to connect audiences with the experience of people like her — people perceived as different.

4) Patti Smith  

"Patti had such a calm and calming presence. There's a beautiful, understated quality to her." — Shad

What was your favourite thing to do before someone told you weren't very good at it? Your answer, says Eat Pray Love author Elizabeth Gilbert, may just lead you back to curiosity. The best-selling writer joins Shad to discuss her inspired how-to guide, Big Magic: Creative Living Without Fear and why she thinks the urge to create becomes destructive if ignored. She also reflects on practical ways to pursue creativity and argues that curiosity is more important than passion. 27:27

Patti Smith on the power of daydream time. In her new book M Train, Patti Smith takes the reader on a winding journey through her life, her memories, her creative impulses, and her secret passions. In an interview packed with sweet and surprising moments, Smith tells Shad about the beauty of the wandering mind. 


5) Elizabeth Gilbert 

"Elizabeth has a timely, inspiring message about our need to create, and about the world's need for all our creativity." — Shad


Elizabeth Gilbert on the perils of ignoring your creative self. What was your favourite thing to do before someone told you weren't very good at it? Your answer, says Eat Pray Love author Elizabeth Gilbert, may just lead you back to curiosity.  

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