White Coat, Black Art

 
 

White Coat, Black Art

Dr. Brian Goldman takes listeners through the swinging doors of hospitals and doctors' offices, behind the curtain where the gurney lies.

Updated: Saturdays
Download episodes from this podcast for: 6 months
Visit Show Site: http://www.cbc.ca/whitecoat

All podcast episodes

Use the links below to download a file.

Dr May Cohen: “You have to be prepared to stand up and fight.”

Dr. May Cohen is a member of the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame and an Officer of the Order of Canada. Early in her career as a family doctor, Dr. Cohen fought for legal access to abortion, which she saw as a fundamental part of women’s health. She tells Dr. Brian Goldman about her experiences seeing a woman die after seeking an illegal abortion, and that the fight for women's right and access to safe abortion is never over.

Download Dr May Cohen: “You have to be prepared to stand up and fight.”
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:04]


After the Overdose Part 2: The Forgotten Ones

In the second of a two-part series Dr. Brian Goldman pulls back the curtain on a side of Canada's opioid crisis that's gotten little attention. After documenting the story of Dayton Wilson, a 24-year-old man from Kamloops who sustained a brain injury from overdosing on fentanyl, Dr. Goldman pays a visit to a Vancouver ICU,which frequently sees patients like Dayton - some of whom will never recover enough to live independently. Critical care specialist Dr. Delbert Dorscheid ays despite the efforts to fight the opioid crisis, the number of overdose patients is not going down, and some end up so damaged by fentanyl overdoses, they are non-responsive and will never recover brain function. Others are going into long- term care homes like Holy Family Hospital n Vancouver, where site director Rae Johnson says they are now caring for 30-something patients with overdose acquired brain injuries, alongside elderly residents.

Download After the Overdose Part 2: The Forgotten Ones
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:05]


After the Overdose Part One: The Forgotten Ones

Dr. Brian Goldman travels to BC, and in the first of a two-part series tells the story of the men and women who are being largely overlooked in Canada's opioid crisis: Those who survive overdoses, but are left with permanent, debilitating brain damage. Authorites regularly track and release the numbers of people who die each month as a result of the opioid crisis, but they do not have a handle on those who suffer brain injuries. Dayton Wilson is one of the them. The 24-year-old Kamloops man took an accidental hit of fentanyl and was left with permanent brain damage that has compromised his ability to speak, his balance and left him with chronic pain. The once-aspiring musician now works part time as a custodian at a ski resort and recieves disability payments. He and his mother piece together the events that led to his overdose, and make the case that as the opioid crisis continues, patients like Dayton are being forgotten.

Download After the Overdose Part One: The Forgotten Ones
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:49]


Food as Medicine: Some doctors are prescribing a plant based diet to address a host of health ailments

Two doctors in rural Newfoundland are teaching locals what they need to know about switching to a plant based diet. It's a win-win for their patients who ditch cod and salt beef in favour of tofu and broccoli. Not only are they losing excess pounds, they are also regaining their health.

Download Food as Medicine: Some doctors are prescribing a plant based diet to address a host of health ailments
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:05]


Doctors who champion low-carb, high-fat diets go against the grain

Meet three doctors who eat a low-carb, high-fat diet, and find out why they'd like to see it more commonly prescribed to patients who are facing metabolic disease, even though some critics call it a fad.

Download Doctors who champion low-carb, high-fat diets go against the grain
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:06]


Echoes of Gord

This month marks three years since the announcement that Gord Downie of the Tragically Hip had glioblastoma, a terminal brain cancer.This week, Dr Brian Goldman talks to two people who were profoundly affected by Gord Downie and his illness: Dr James Perry, the Sunnybrook neuro-oncologist who treated Downie and Denis Raymond, an Ottawa social worker and teacher who also has GBM.

Download Echoes of Gord
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:13]


How one doctor fought her bullies and won

Halifax cardiologist Dr. Gabrielle Horne spent 14 years fighting to restore her reputation after she was bullied and bad-mouthed by supervisors when she was an up-and-coming researcher. She was eventually awarded the largest settlement in Canada for loss of reputation. While her story is extraordinary, it's not isolated. Recent Canadian surveys reveal 60% of medical students and 75% of residents report being harassed, intimidated or personally mistreated by someone in authority. This week White Coat, Black Art explores why doctors bully and what it will take to change the culture that allows it to happen, with insights from both Dr. Horne and lawyer Valerie Wise, who represents both doctors and their employers in disputes

Download How one doctor fought her bullies and won
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:15]


Meet the paramedic with a side hustle as the town mortician

Meet Matthew Sias: a small-town paramedic, deputy coroner and funeral assistant. Dr. Brian Goldman speaks to Sias about the tricky challenges when his different jobs collide.

Download Meet the paramedic with a side hustle as the town mortician
[mp3 file: runs 00:30:05]


Prescription for loneliness

White Coat Black Art looks at ways of dealing with loneliness in seniors. We visit roommates Cara Duncan, 23 and Lesly Adamson, 92. Dr. Mayur Lakhani, a family doctor and president of Britain's Royal College of General Practitioners, talks about the social prescribing expert in his office who guides his patients to local community activities. Dr. Helen Kingston, another U.K. doctor, tells Brian about the Compassionate Frome Project, a plan to treat lonely patients in her hometown of Frome.

Download Prescription for loneliness
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:15]


The measles comeback

Dr. Brian Goldman looks at the global spread of measles, what it means to Canadians, and how we went from believing the disease was cornered to a crisis point in less than 2 years. Brian speaks to Jayda Kelsall, an Ottawa cancer patient with up-to-date vaccines, who contracted the disease on a trip to the UK, and New York Times "plagues and pestilences" reporter, Donald G. McNeil Jr., who has traced the origins of the current outbreak in New York, and the resurgence of measles around the world.

Download The measles comeback
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:15]


Measles: How did we get here? Bonus Podcast

In this bonus podcast Dr. Goldman speaks to Donald G. McNeil Jr. a New York Times science reporter who unpacks how New York City ended up declaring a public health emergency over the measles, as well as revealing the factors at play in a worldwide resurgence of the disease.

Download Measles: How did we get here? Bonus Podcast
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:54]


'I didn't think I could have a baby': Toronto pregnancy clinic supports women with disabilities

Christine Lumilan wasn't sure she'd ever become a mother. The Toronto woman knew that having cerebral palsy, diabetes and polycystic ovaries could make pregnancy challenging. When she unexpectedly found herself pregnant, the 39-year-old woman turned to a unique clinic, and doctor to help her through her pregnancy and the birth of her son, Dawson. The Accessible Care Pregnancy Clinic and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre has exam rooms and a birthing unit that are wheelchair accessible, as well as chairs, scales and beds that accommodate a variety of disabilities. They also coordinate specialists appointments to ensure there's a continuity in care for patients with more complicated care. But as Dr. Anne Berndl, the specialist who runs the clinic explains, the clinic is also helping women overcome another hurdle when it comes to giving birth -- attitudes from people -- even healthcare workers --- who still believe that disability is a barrier to giving birth and parenting.

Download 'I didn't think I could have a baby': Toronto pregnancy clinic supports women with disabilities
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:14]


What it's like growing up with FASD

A mom, a doctor and a person with FASD talk about living with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Laurie Whyte talks about raising her son Richie. Dr. Ana Hanlon-Dearman explains the symptoms of the disorder and how best to support people with FASD. Myles Himmelreich tells how he copes and thrives as an adult with FASD.

Download What it's like growing up with FASD
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:15]


'I was still failed:' Despite regular screening Ontario woman faces late-stage cervix cancer

Karla Van Kessel's GP failed to recognize she had symptoms of cervical cancer and her Pap smear results were misread causing a delay in diagnosis that took away her best shot at a cure. Now, she thinks women need to demand better screening tests and keep tabs on their medical records to avoid the same fate.

Download 'I was still failed:' Despite regular screening Ontario woman faces late-stage cervix cancer
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:15]


How Alan Alda went from TV doctor to teaching real doctors about empathy

Alan Alda is best known for his 11 seasons on MASH but he's also forged a second career as an expert in communication. He tells Dr. Brian Goldman it began with hosting Scientific American on PBS, where he talked to some of the world's smartest people and helped them get their ideas across. About a decdade ago the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science was established. It's trained more than 13,000 doctors and health professionals, using improvisation as a key tool. Alda also talks about his new podcast, Clear + Vivid which is all about human relationships, and he reveals why he went public with this diagnosis of Parkinson's disease last summer.

Download How Alan Alda went from TV doctor to teaching real doctors about empathy
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:16]


Palliative care team helps the homeless die 'with dignity.' A healing circle helps them grieve

After a homeless woman died of breast cancer, the doctors, nurses and shelter workers who helped to ease her final days gathered to remember her.

Download Palliative care team helps the homeless die 'with dignity.' A healing circle helps them grieve
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:08]


'I'm alive because of it': Ostomy advocate fights to dispel stigmas around the life-saving procedure

Dr Brian Goldman talks to Jessica Grossman, a twenty-nine year-old marketing executive with Crohn's disease. In an effort to battle the stigma of having an ostomy, she uses social media to post photos of herself with her ostomy clearly visible. Brian also talks to Karen Bruton, a frontline nurse in Victoria BC who specializes in wound, ostomy and continence care - or NSWOC for short. In her 34-year career, Bruton has taught dozens of patients how to live with an ostomy. She says much of the stigma surrounding ostomies comes directly from health care providers themselves.

Download 'I'm alive because of it': Ostomy advocate fights to dispel stigmas around the life-saving procedure
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:09]


Part-time MDs defend their work: 'It doesn't make us any less valuable'

Not a lot of doctors expect to work part-time while in the throes of a demanding medical school education. But more are choosing to do so after they graduate. It's estimated that 15 percent of Canadian doctors work part-time. Some do it because they want to, others need to, as a means of coping with stress that's inherent in the job This week, Dr. Brian Goldman speaks with two part-time doctors who explain their choice.

Download Part-time MDs defend their work: 'It doesn't make us any less valuable'
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:08]


A meaningful life

Elizabeth Rathbun is one of more than 77,000 Canadians who live with Multiple Sclerosis. She shares her 30-year journey with the disease, and offers insight into what it's like to live with MS, and into the health-care system.

Download A meaningful life
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:11]


Medical Muses & listener feedback

Vivian Tam's older brother Stanley died in 2016 of cancer, while she was a medical student. She speaks to Dr. Goldman about how his illness and death have shaped her as a physician. We also hear from listeners on everything from low-carb diets and reconstructive surgery after breast cancer to recovering from mental illness.

Download Medical Muses & listener feedback
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:12]


Why bringing room service to hospitals helps patients convalesce

Hospital chefs and medical students make a hands-on connection to put food at the heart of preventative care.

Download Why bringing room service to hospitals helps patients convalesce
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:12]


After breast cancer and failed reconstruction, this mom found beauty by going flat

Joanna Rankin, a 40-year-old Calgary woman, is not only a survivor of breast cancer, but of breast reconstruction that went wrong. She found emotional and physical healing in going flat.

Download After breast cancer and failed reconstruction, this mom found beauty by going flat
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:09]


Doctors who champion low-carb, high-fat diets go against the grain

Meet three doctors who eat a low-carb, high-fat diet, and find out why they'd like to see it more commonly prescribed to patients who are facing metabolic disease, even though some critics call it a fad.

Download Doctors who champion low-carb, high-fat diets go against the grain
[mp3 file: runs 00:33:00]


Astronaut and ER doctor Dave Williams on success and setbacks

Astronaut and ER doctor Dave Williams shares stories of his successes and setbacks with Dr. Brian Goldman. Williams says that failure is a key part of success.

Download Astronaut and ER doctor Dave Williams on success and setbacks
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:10]


Wounded healers - repeat

How peer support workers help people with mental health crises in the ER of the North Bay Regional Health Centre.

Download Wounded healers - repeat
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:51]


They taught me how to be a doctor

Dr. Julia Orkin's life - and the course of her medical career - changed when she met a very special patient and her family in 2010.

Download They taught me how to be a doctor
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:51]


Xavier's long road back

Rachelle Downton hoped her son Xavier, 4, would take a few steps with a walker for Christmas. That likely won't happen, and doctors say his recovery from AFM, a frightening and mysterious ailment may take much longer.

Download Xavier's long road back
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:51]


Why more needs to be done in end-of-life care for adult patients with complex needs

Tristan Lederman, 34, spent his final months in pain and distress before he died. His parents say he got inadequate palliative care from his doctors. One expert says gaps in both the health-care and educational systems have left doctors unprepared to help adult patients with complex needs have best death that they can.

Download Why more needs to be done in end-of-life care for adult patients with complex needs
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:51]


Poet, peer support worker and advocate: How Amy Willans remade her life after a mental illness diagnosis

Amy Willans was a driven nursing student and champion figure skater in 1996 when she became depressed and began to experience paranoid thoughts. She would eventually be hospitalized and diagnosed with schizoaffective disorder. Now a published poet and an acclaimed peer support worker, she talks to Dr. Goldman about living with mental illness and her journey to recovery.

Download Poet, peer support worker and advocate: How Amy Willans remade her life after a mental illness diagnosis
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:52]


Early therapy is best after a stroke, but many rural Canadians are missing out

Dr. Brian Goldman speaks to Linda Windross from Castor, Alberta about her husband's frustrating wait for stroke rehabilitation. Dr. Anita Mountain of Dalhousie University in Halifax and Heart and Stroke's Patrice Lindsay tell Dr. Goldman that the good news is more patients are surviving strokes, but the bad news, we "haven't got a system built for that many survivors."

Download Early therapy is best after a stroke, but many rural Canadians are missing out
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:14]


Dr Burnout

Dr Shelly Dev shares her story of burnout.

Download Dr Burnout
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:14]


Prescription for loneliness

White Coat Black Art looks at ways of dealing with loneliness in seniors. We visit roommates Cara Duncan, 23 and Lesly Adamson, 92. Dr. Mayur Lakhani, a family doctor and president of Britain's Royal College of General Practitioners, talks about the social prescribing expert in his office who guides his patients to local community activities. Dr. Helen Kingston, another U.K. doctor, tells Brian about the Compassionate Frome Project, a plan to treat lonely patients in her hometown of Frome.

Download Prescription for loneliness
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:10]


The dissident doctor who put women and children first

You may not know Dr. Michael Klein's name, but if you've had a child in the past 30 years, he may have played a key role in how that baby came into the world. Klein was a pioneer in pushing the medical system to put the needs of mothers and babies first -- including exposing the fact that the episiotomy, a once-routine procedure performed on mothers giving birth was doing more harm than good. Brian speaks to him about his new memoir: Dissident Doctor: Catching Babies and Challenging the Medical Status Quo, and finds out how Klein's past as a Vietnam draft deserter whose father was blacklisted in the McCarthy era, led him to a revolutionary career in medicine. (Perhaps you've heard of his daughter...Naomi?)

Download The dissident doctor who put women and children first
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:09]


Why every cancer patient in Canada deserves a cancer coach

Dr Brian Goldman heads to the Ottawa Regional Cancer Foundation to learn about an emerging health care profession: cancer coaches.

Download Why every cancer patient in Canada deserves a cancer coach
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:06]


Women with disabilities have sex. So why are their sexual health needs often ignored?

Doctors need to see people with disabilities as sexual beings.

Download Women with disabilities have sex. So why are their sexual health needs often ignored?
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:06]


The cannabis question show

Recorded at St. Joseph's Healthcare in Hamilton, Ontario, scientists and physicians from the Centre for Medicinal Cannabis Research tackle questions ranging from whether it's safe to drive after using cannabis, the dangers of second-hand pot smoke to how long the drug stays in your system, and how it interacts with other drugs - and much more.

Download The cannabis question show
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:06]


Of Monsters and Medicine

This week: The surprising intersection between the worlds of medicine and monsters

Download Of Monsters and Medicine
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:13]


What families can learn from Wettlaufer inquiry into nursing home care

'Provide good quality care, not just any care,' nursing home advocate says of Wettlaufer inquiry lessons

Download What families can learn from Wettlaufer inquiry into nursing home care
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:12]


How Alan Alda went from playing a doctor on TV to teaching doctors about empathy

Alan Alda is best known for his 11 seasons on MASH but he's also forged a second career as an expert in communication. He tells Dr. Brian Goldman it began with hosting Scientific American on PBS, where he talked to some of the world's smartest people and helped them get their ideas across. About a decdade ago the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science was established. It's trained more than 13,000 doctors and health professionals, using improvisation as a key tool. Alda also talks about his new podcast, Clear and Vivid which is all about human relationships, and he reveals why he went public with this diagnosis of Parkinson's disease this summer.

Download How Alan Alda went from playing a doctor on TV to teaching doctors about empathy
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:10]


The hidden dangers of dense breasts

More than 40 per cent of Canadian women have dense breasts that increase the risk of breast cancer and render many of those cancers invisible on a mammogram. It's a surprisingly common problem that experts say should be getting much more public attention.

Download The hidden dangers of dense breasts
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:09]


Planet Youth: How Iceland turned around a crisis in teen drinking

Dr. Brian Goldman travels to Iceland to find out how they turned around a culture of binge-drinking among youth, and discovers what we can learn from their incredible public health turnaround, just as Canada prepares to legalize cannabis.

Download Planet Youth: How Iceland turned around a crisis in teen drinking
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:54]


How safe is your medical device? Even regulators may not really know (Encore)

Could your hip replacement hurt you? Journalist Jeanne Lenzer explores the medical device industry in her book, The Danger Within Us.

Download How safe is your medical device? Even regulators may not really know (Encore)
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:05]


Seniors tell Dr. Brian Goldman what it's really like to live in long-term care (Encore)

Sharron Cooke and Devora Greenspon speak frankly about life in long-term residential care, from the loss of freedom to advocating for those who can't do it themselves.

Download Seniors tell Dr. Brian Goldman what it's really like to live in long-term care (Encore)
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:06]


She hid it for years, but now this doctor is talking about her own disability

Dr Paige Church, developmental paediatrician talks about her life as a doctor with spina bifida.

Download She hid it for years, but now this doctor is talking about her own disability
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:29]


Season Finale: #Metoo in Medicine Part 2, reaction to our town hall and a follow up our first story of the season

This week: A follow to our #metoo in medicine show - A senior MD goes on the record about her experience being sexually harassed by a mentor, and details what she and others are doing to change the culture that allows for abuse. Reaction to our our Crisis of Care town hall event and we follow up on our first story of the season, about a woman who got treated for 'food addiction' alongside people who are addicted to alcohol and cocaine.

Download Season Finale: #Metoo in Medicine Part 2, reaction to our town hall and a follow up our first story of the season
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:28]


Crisis of Care: A town hall meeting for families and their disabled children who are aging out of the system

On June 12, White Coat, Black Art hosted a town hall meeting on 'aging out' at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto. Parents, caregivers gathered to talk about the crisis of care they face when children with disabilities and complex needs 'age out' of the pediatric system that has supported them for their entire lives.

Download Crisis of Care: A town hall meeting for families and their disabled children who are aging out of the system
[mp3 file: runs 00:54:27]