White Coat, Black Art

 
 

White Coat, Black Art

Dr. Brian Goldman takes listeners through the swinging doors of hospitals and doctors' offices, behind the curtain where the gurney lies.

Updated: Saturdays
Download episodes from this podcast for: 6 months
Visit Show Site: http://www.cbc.ca/whitecoat

All podcast episodes

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Running on Fumes

Dr. Brian Goldman talks to three health-care professionals about the toll the pandemic has taken on them emotionally and physically, and how they feel facing a new increase in cases. Our guests are Naheed Dosani, a palliative care doctor; Nathan Stall, a geriatrician and researcher; and Maureen Taylor, a physician assistant.

Download Running on Fumes
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:45]


Introducing: Sickboy

The Sickboy podcast is determined to break down the stigma associated with illness and disease. Hosts and best friends Jeremie, Bryan, and Taylor tackle health taboos with people who have experienced those challenges firsthand and take their lead from Jeremie's life long battle with Cystic Fibrosis. Together they help us understand that sometimes the best way to deal with illness, disease, and life is simply to laugh. More episodes are available at smarturl.it/sickboycbc

Download Introducing: Sickboy
[mp3 file: runs 01:11:45]


'A local solution to a global pandemic:' How COVID-19 lit the spark for a new program that connects rural Ontarians to rapid-response health care

The pandemic has changed all of our lives. But it's also changed our health-care system in surprising, and even positive ways. This season, White Coat, Black Art will explore that idea, beginning with a story about how a rural community in Ontario re-imagined primary care as a result of the global pandemic. Dr. Brian Goldman visits Renfrew County to find out about their Virtual Triage Assessment Centre, which was set up to provide COVID-19 testing but which also promises same-day virtual access to family doctors in a place where 20 percent of the population doesn't have a family physician. They also get home visits from community paramedics who deliver basic primary care and act as the doctor's eyes and ears. Dr. Goldman rides along with a community paramedic as he visits an elderly cancer patient and he checks in with the architects of VTAC, who call it a 'silver lining' to the pandemic and make the case for it to become a permanent fixture in their community.

Download 'A local solution to a global pandemic:' How COVID-19 lit the spark for a new program that connects rural Ontarians to rapid-response health care
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:40]


Mentioning the unmentionable

We’re making mention of the common yet often unmentionable problem: pelvic floor dysfunction. Close to 40% of older women are affected by pelvic floor disorders. This week, this program received a Gracie award from the Alliance for Women in Media Foundation.

Download Mentioning the unmentionable
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:43]


How can I safely return to work during the pandemic?

Dr. Lynora Saxinger, an infectious diseases specialist and associate professor of microbiology and immunology at the University of Alberta in Edmonton answers how to return to work safely during the pandemic.

Download How can I safely return to work during the pandemic?
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:45]


What do I need to know about COVID-19 and blood pressure?

Dr. Nadia Khan, an internal medicine specialist and president of Hypertension Canada, joins host Dr. Brian Goldman to fact-check the information — and misinformation —people are seeing online and in the media about the relationship between blood pressure medications and Covid 19. She also answers the question "When should I worry about my blood pressure?" and offers advice on how to manage hypertension.

Download What do I need to know about COVID-19 and blood pressure?
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:42]


The Dose: How can I send my kids back to school safely

Dr Nisha Thampi, medical director of infection prevention and control at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, answers the question: How can I send my kids back to school safely for them and for us?

Download The Dose: How can I send my kids back to school safely
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:49]


The Dose: As Canadians hope for coronavirus vaccine, many aren't getting immunized against other diseases

As scientists race to develop a vaccine to combat the coronavirus epidemic, many Canadian adults aren't getting taking advantage of vaccinations that are already available to protect them against other serious illnesses, public health experts say.

Download The Dose: As Canadians hope for coronavirus vaccine, many aren't getting immunized against other diseases
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:54]


Your mask questions answered

Dr. Brian Goldman and infectious disease expert Dr. Susy Hota explain how masks work and how best to use them.

Download Your mask questions answered
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:00]


How safe are my favourite summer activities like swimming, cottaging and backyard parties?

This week Dr. Goldman and Dr. Lynora Saxsinger, an infectious diseases expert from the University of Alberta weigh the risks of summer pass times, from camping and cottaging to swimming, backyard get-togethers, weddings and more.

Download How safe are my favourite summer activities like swimming, cottaging and backyard parties?
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:42]


What's the best advice for losing my COVID-19 pounds?

Addressing emotional roots of comfort eating key to losing weight gained during the pandemic.

Download What's the best advice for losing my COVID-19 pounds?
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:48]


The Dose: How do contact tracing apps work, and what do I need to know about them?

Dr Prabhat Jha, Director of the Centre for Global Health Research, at St Michael’s Hospital, and Professor of epidemiology, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto answers questions about contact tracing.

Download The Dose: How do contact tracing apps work, and what do I need to know about them?
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:39]


Giving birth during the height of a pandemic: a reporter's diary

CBC reporter Marika Wheeler reveals what it's like to have one of the most joyful events in your life happen during one of the most stressful times in history. Marika delivered her second child at the height of the global pandemic. In an audio diary she leads listeners through the weeks leading up to the birth, including her concerns about staying safe, and worries that her husband might not be able to be present at the delivery due to hospital restrictions. She takes us inside the hospital, for a personal take on how the pandemic is impacting patients who are giving birth.

Download Giving birth during the height of a pandemic: a reporter's diary
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:40]


Unlocking Bryson’s dad: CBC podcast host says son taught him a lot about fatherhood

Dr. Brian Goldman talks to Keith McArthur, the creator and host of the CBC podcast "Unlocking Bryson's Brain.” McArthur’s son Bryson has a severe genetic disorder that’s so rare it took nearly a decade to get a diagnosis. Now 13, Bryson is a happy kid, but his illness means he can't walk, talk or feed himself, and he’s thought to have a mental age of a one-year-old. The “‘medical mystery” series chronicles McArthur’s search to find more information about Bryson’s condition, known as a GRIN disorder — and his quest to find a cure.

Download Unlocking Bryson’s dad: CBC podcast host says son taught him a lot about fatherhood
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:37]


A New Normal: As COVID-19 restrictions are loosened, Canada must do more to protect vulnerable groups, expert says

Across the country, declining rates of COVID-19 infections have led to cautious plans to relax physical distancing and gradually open up businesses. This week on White Coat, Black Art, Dr. Patricia Daly, Vice President of Public Health and Chief Medical Health Officer for Vancouver Coastal Health, talks to Dr. Goldman about what’s working in British Columbia, and how it might help the rest of the country. Dr. Andrew Boozary, Executive Director of Health and Social Policy at University Health Network talks about long-standing issues we need to deal with to protect vulnerable people as we move towards opening up. He says COVID-19 has "ripped back the curtain" on inequities in our country that have led to poor outcomes for people who live in poverty, are homeless and who experience racism. Dr Boozary says it's crucial that Canada collect more data on how the virus has impacted those communities so we can be better prepared to protect them now and in the future.

Download A New Normal: As COVID-19 restrictions are loosened, Canada must do more to protect vulnerable groups, expert says
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:40]


People with disabilities left out of the conversation about coping with COVID, advocates say

Although the coronavirus poses higher-than-average risk to people living with disabilities, they say they’ve largely been left out of the conversation on how to cope during the pandemic and feel the government has been slow to provide them with any financial assistance.

Download People with disabilities left out of the conversation about coping with COVID, advocates say
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:40]


Amid pandemic, opioid crisis ‘isn’t going away’ and will ‘kill more Canadians,’ says Dr. Daniel Kalla

Dr, Goldman speaks to Vancouver ER physician and author Dr. Daniel Kalla. Kalla's latest novel The Last High tracks the search for a deadly supply of fentanyl. Kalla also discusses his prescient previous novel , Pandemic, which was about the spread of a deadly virus. He tells Dr. Goldman how his work in the ER informed his writing, and discusses what kind of an impact the current pandemic is having on the opioid crisis.

Download Amid pandemic, opioid crisis ‘isn’t going away’ and will ‘kill more Canadians,’ says Dr. Daniel Kalla
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:40]


How virtual therapy is helping people cope with pandemic’s emotional strains

As patients struggle with their mental health during the pandemic, many are turning to online therapy. Dr. Goldman speaks to Vancouver psychologist Christine Korol who has been a leader in virtual therapy for 15 years. And author and journalist Anna Mehler Paperny, who is receiving therapy on line, shares her thoughts about that. She also has advice for people coping with mental health issues, including how they can talk to their employers about what their going through, and how those employers should respond. Paperny's memoir about living with depression, Hello I Want to Die Please Fix Me came out late last year.

Download How virtual therapy is helping people cope with pandemic’s emotional strains
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:48]


Keep calm and carry on? Promote resilience for better outcomes, says CAMH psychiatrist

We hear from listeners about their current struggles and approaches to mental health during the pandemic and Dr. Kwame McKenzie talks about how we can look to the past for examples of how to build mental health resilience and what to avoid.

Download Keep calm and carry on? Promote resilience for better outcomes, says CAMH psychiatrist
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:05]


The Plight of Personal Support Workers during COVID-19

A Personal Support Worker says she felt 'obliged' to go back to work despite experiencing COVID-19 symptoms. The worker, who has been a PSW for a decade in long-term care homes, told White Coat, Black Art the COVID-19 pandemic is a crisis on top of an already existing crisis for PSWs. Former federal health Minister and family doctor Jane Philpott talks about her work at home alongside PSWs at a home for people with severe disabilities, that's been hit card by COVID-19. Dr. Philpott questions the role of for-profit care in the the long term care sector.

Download The Plight of Personal Support Workers during COVID-19
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:43]


I'd rather sleep on the street': Homeless cancer patient scared to stay in Toronto's shelters amid COVID-19

Robert Boast, a homeless 60-year-old Toronto man with incurable prostate and colon cancer, told White Coat, Black Art that he is more frightened of catching COVID-19 than dying from cancer. Dr. Naheed Dosani, a palliative care doctor, who is also managing Peel Region's COVID-19 homelessness response, says COVID-19 is hitting vulnerable populates like a "guided missle."

Download I'd rather sleep on the street': Homeless cancer patient scared to stay in Toronto's shelters amid COVID-19
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:42]


Sidelined patients reject being 'collateral damage' during COVID-19

Canada’s provinces and territories began postponing elective medical and surgical procedures days after COVID-19 was declared a pandemic. Patients fearful for their health say advocating for care may make a difference. Dr. Brian Goldman speaks to one woman whose breast cancer surgery has been on hold for a month, and another who successfully lobbied for vision-saving cataract surgery. And a hospital vice-president and surgical oncologist explains how his hospital is deciding which patients procedures are urgent, and which are not.

Download Sidelined patients reject being 'collateral damage' during COVID-19
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:49]


No Visitors Please : Families grapple with new COVID-19 policies that leave them cut off from vulnerable loved ones in hospital

Since the World Health Organization declared COVID19 a pandemic, hospitals across Canada have kept most visitors outside the sliding doors. There are a few exceptions, such as when you're giving birth or a loved one is critically ill or dying. But for the majority of people hospitalized with COVID19 or other conditions such as a heart attack or cancer, it means patients only on the inside, and loved ones on the outside. The aim is stringent infection control to protect frontline healthcare workers and the most vulnerable of patients from the coronavirus. But as time passes, we’re coming to grips with the fact that there’s a cost to that. This week, White Coat, Black Art speaks to Canadians who are grappling with the policy. Donna Morgan's 87-year old father has been in a B.C. hospital since February when he had a stroke. She hasn't seen him for nearly a month and says she's worried about his mental and physical health. Anna Foat of London, Ont., chose to take her mother-in-law, who has dementia, out of her rehab facility. (This interview is podcast only). Winnipeger Bryan Regehr (Re-Geer), an emergency and cardiac nurse at St. Boniface Hospital In Winnipeg talks to Dr. Goldman about having the unfortunate task of telling families they can't see their loved ones. Advocates are now starting to push for the policy to be re-examined. Julie Drury of Ottawa is the former chair of the Patient and Family Advisory Council for Ontario. She believes there's still a place for some family members inside the hospital, even during the COVID-19.

Download No Visitors Please : Families grapple with new COVID-19 policies that leave them cut off from vulnerable loved ones in hospital
[mp3 file: runs 00:34:07]


Introducing Unlocking Bryson's Brain

Bryson seems like a perfectly healthy baby. But soon doctors confirm his parents’ worst fears: something is wrong with Bryson’s brain. Despite dozens of tests over nearly a decade, doctors come up empty in their efforts to find a diagnosis.Then one day, everything changes. Scientists working at the cutting edge of genetics believe they know what's causing Bryson's disease — and think it could be reversed. Here’s the first episode of the new CBC podcast, Unlocking Bryson’s Brain. More episodes are available at hyperurl.co/unlocking

Download Introducing Unlocking Bryson's Brain
[mp3 file: runs 00:53:42]


From the frontlines: What it's like to treat COVID-19 patients, and what it's like to be a doctor infected with COVID-19

Canadians are doing their bit to control the spread of COVID-19 through physical distancing. The idea is to stay far away from a sometimes-deadly virus to which we’re not immune. You can’t do that if you’re a frontline healthcare worker. This week, Dr. Brian Goldman speaks to fellow healthcare workers, who, like him, are dealing with COVID-19 every day, on the job. Maureen Taylor is a physician assistant working on COVID-19 ward at Toronto's Michael Garron hospital. She shares an intimate look at what it's like to treat COVID-19 patients, some of whom will not recover. She and Dr. Goldman share thoughts on how they remain calm in the face of the crisis, concerns about a lack of protective equipment and the heightened risk they face for getting infected. That risk became a reality for Dr. Joseph Finkler, a Vancover ER doctor who is now recovering from COVID-19. He tells Dr. Goldman what it felt like to have COVID-19 and how he feels now that he's recovered, including the fact that he's facing stigma from neighbours and even other healthcare workers because he tested positive.

Download From the frontlines: What it's like to treat COVID-19 patients, and what it's like to be a doctor infected with COVID-19
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:39]


"I thought, this virus is not going to get me, what are you talking about?" - Dr. Joseph Finkler, on getting COVID-19

Extended interview with Vancouver ER physician Dr. Joseph FInkler who is now recovering from COVID-19. He admits thinking that he was "invincible" before he got the virus, and describes what it was like to come to terms with testing positive, and what that has meant for him and his family. He tells Dr. Brian Goldman that testing positive has led to him facing some stigma from neighbours and even other healthcare workers who are anxious about him returning to work.

Download "I thought, this virus is not going to get me, what are you talking about?" - Dr. Joseph Finkler, on getting COVID-19
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:57]


Ontario seniors living in COVID-19 infected care homes frightened and lonely

Residents living in Long Term Care homes tell us what it's like to be locked down, lonely and isolated during a Covid outbreak.

Download Ontario seniors living in COVID-19 infected care homes frightened and lonely
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:39]


'This isn't Halloween candy': Infectious disease specialist cautious over drugs touted as COVID-19 treatment

This month U.S. President Trump hailed two drugs as potential treatments for COVID-19. Infectious disease specialist Dr. Isaac Bogoch weighs in on the hype and the reality behind these medications.

Download 'This isn't Halloween candy': Infectious disease specialist cautious over drugs touted as COVID-19 treatment
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:38]


'These are historic numbers': How one Toronto hospital is preparing to battle COVID-19

North York General Hospital, one of Toronto’s busiest health-care facilities, is preparing for an influx of COVID-19 patients as the number of infections continues to climb day after day across the province.

Download 'These are historic numbers': How one Toronto hospital is preparing to battle COVID-19
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:40]


We need to talk more about death, says U.K. palliative care expert who's witnessed thousands die

Author and physician Dr. Kathryn Mannix says health-care workers have to get comfortable with having frank conversations with patients when death is imminent, so they can be prepared.

Download We need to talk more about death, says U.K. palliative care expert who's witnessed thousands die
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:40]


'Undignified' 100-year-old hospital gown design in desperate need of redesign, doctor says

Likening the 100-year-old hospital gown to a prisoner's orange jumpsuit, a prominent British doctor says the "alien, open-at-the-back garment" is in desperate need of a redesign.

Download 'Undignified' 100-year-old hospital gown design in desperate need of redesign, doctor says
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:37]


"I've saved somewhere between 750 and 800 people"

Dr Brian Goldman takes you into the single-room occupancy hotels of Vancouver's Downtown Eastside. His guide is Jeremy Bell, a member of TORO (Tenant Overdose Response Organizers). As a drug user and resident of a single-room occupancy hotel, Jeremy is a first-responder of a different type.

Download "I've saved somewhere between 750 and 800 people"
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:46]


How complex care services delivered to rural areas became a 'life-changer' for this family

The Tucker family lives in Orillia, Ont., whose hospital is home to a clinic specializing in complex care for children living in remote parts of Ontario.

Download How complex care services delivered to rural areas became a 'life-changer' for this family
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:37]


Should I worry if my BMI is too high?

INTRODUCING THE DOSE: Having a high BMI is supposed to be a call to get serious about your health by losing weight. But recent studies say BMI can be inaccurate and misleading. So should you worry if your BMI is too high? To cut through the BS about BMI, Dr. Brian Goldman sits down with Dr. Arya Sharma, a professor of medicine at the University of Alberta, who just happens to be Canada’s obesity guru.

Download Should I worry if my BMI is too high?
[mp3 file: runs 00:16:04]


Pay-as-you-go health care: Uninsured people in Canada face sky-high bills, delays in treatment

Most Canadians take universal healthcare for granted - secure in the knowledge that all you have to do is walk into a clinic or hospital and you will be treated. For some half a million people who live and work amongst us, it's a different reality. This week, Dr. Brian Goldman reveals what happens to those who have no health insurance. Grace* is a 52-year-old woman who came to Canada 19 years ago to work as a nanny. She lost her access to health insurance when she lost her job. She remained in Canada, working under the table, paying for medical appointments in cash. Four months ago, she discovered a lump in her breast. She paid up front for tests that detected a tumour, but soon ran out of money. By the time she was diagnosed at a clinic for the uninsured in Toronto last month, the tumour was 3 times bigger. She now has stage 3 breast cancer, and needs life-saving surgery. Dr. Paul Caulford heads the Canadian Centre for Refugees & Immigrant Healthcare, which runs the clinic. He's fundraising for Grace's treatment and trying to find a surgeon to operate for free. Despite his best efforts, he tells Dr. Brian Goldman, the delays and lack of treatment can be deadly for some of his uninsured patients. *Note: Grace is pseudonym given to the patient who has been granted confidentiality to protect her privacy.

Download Pay-as-you-go health care: Uninsured people in Canada face sky-high bills, delays in treatment
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:38]


Choosing cancer

Producer Lise Hosein tells her story as a patient diagnosed with papillary thyroid cancerUntil recently, treatment meant getting surgery to remove the thyroid glands. Now doctors are discovering that surgery can in many cases be safely avoided. Patients can safely choose to live with their cancer. For Lise, that seismic shift in treatment comes too late.

Download Choosing cancer
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:40]


'We aren't going to hide the fact that this is what we do': How abortion doulas are breaking down stigma

Lack of funding, distance, a patchwork of provincial laws and stigma are some of the barriers facing women seeking abortions in Canada, says Shannon Hardy, who volunteers as an abortion doula.

Download 'We aren't going to hide the fact that this is what we do': How abortion doulas are breaking down stigma
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:41]


'Stand up for yourself': Amid coronavirus outbreak, nurse reflects on living through SARS in 2003

In 2003, nurse Susan Sorrenti contracted SARS while working at Toronto’s Mount Sinai Hospital. As a similar virus prompts health warnings in China and around the world, Sorrenti recalls her gruelling experience and reflects on the lessons we can learn as we grapple with this new illness. Plus, an update on the emerging story from infectious disease reporter Helen Branswell of Stat News.

Download 'Stand up for yourself': Amid coronavirus outbreak, nurse reflects on living through SARS in 2003
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:43]


Pay-as-you-go health care: Uninsured people in Canada face sky-high bills, delays in treatment

Most Canadians take universal healthcare for granted - secure in the knowledge that all you have to do is walk into a clinic or hospital and you will be treated. For some half a million people who live and work amongst us, it's a different reality. This week, Dr. Brian Goldman reveals what happens to those who have no health insurance. Grace* is a 52-year-old woman who came to Canada 19 years ago to work as a nanny. She lost her access to health insurance when she lost her job. She remained in Canada, working under the table, paying for medical appointments in cash. Four months ago, she discovered a lump in her breast. She paid up front for tests that detected a tumour, but soon ran out of money. By the time she was diagnosed at a clinic for the uninsured in Toronto last month, the tumour was 3 times bigger. She now has stage 3 breast cancer, and needs life-saving surgery. Dr. Paul Caulford heads the Canadian Centre for Refugees & Immigrant Healthcare, which runs the clinic. He's fundraising for Grace's treatment and trying to find a surgeon to operate for free. Despite his best efforts, he tells Dr. Brian Goldman, the delays and lack of treatment can be deadly for some of his uninsured patients. *Note: Grace is pseudonym given to the patient who has been granted confidentiality to protect her privacy.

Download Pay-as-you-go health care: Uninsured people in Canada face sky-high bills, delays in treatment
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:40]


The DUDES Club

Nearly 3 out of 4 Canadian men live unhealthy lifestyles. The DUDES Club on Vancouver's Downtown Eastside shows that with the proper support, men can take better care of their mental and physical health no matter where they live.

Download The DUDES Club
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:54]


Writer's block, neurosis and empathy: A rare look at Dr. Oliver Sacks early career

Lawrence Weschler's memoir 'And How are You, Dr. Sacks' recounts his 30-plus year friendship with the famed neurologist and author, Oliver Sacks.

Download Writer's block, neurosis and empathy: A rare look at Dr. Oliver Sacks early career
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:40]


'I didn't think I could have a baby': Toronto pregnancy clinic supports women with disabilities

Christine Lumilan wasn't sure she'd ever become a mother. The Toronto woman knew that having cerebral palsy, diabetes and polycystic ovaries could make pregnancy challenging. When she unexpectedly found herself pregnant, the 39-year-old woman turned to a unique clinic, and doctor to help her through her pregnancy and the birth of her son, Dawson. The Accessible Care Pregnancy Clinic and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre has exam rooms and a birthing unit that are wheelchair accessible, as well as chairs, scales and beds that accommodate a variety of disabilities. They also coordinate specialists appointments to ensure there's a continuity in care for patients with more complicated care. But as Dr. Anne Berndl, the specialist who runs the clinic explains, the clinic is also helping women overcome another hurdle when it comes to giving birth -- attitudes from people -- even healthcare workers --- who still believe that disability is a barrier to giving birth and parenting.

Download 'I didn't think I could have a baby': Toronto pregnancy clinic supports women with disabilities
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:40]


'I didn't think I could have a baby': Toronto pregnancy clinic supports women with disabilities

Christine Lumilan wasn't sure she'd ever become a mother. The Toronto woman knew that having cerebral palsy, diabetes and polycystic ovaries could make pregnancy challenging. When she unexpectedly found herself pregnant, the 39-year-old woman turned to a unique clinic, and doctor to help her through her pregnancy and the birth of her son, Dawson. The Accessible Care Pregnancy Clinic and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre has exam rooms and a birthing unit that are wheelchair accessible, as well as chairs, scales and beds that accommodate a variety of disabilities. They also coordinate specialists appointments to ensure there's a continuity in care for patients with more complicated care. But as Dr. Anne Berndl, the specialist who runs the clinic explains, the clinic is also helping women overcome another hurdle when it comes to giving birth -- attitudes from people -- even healthcare workers --- who still believe that disability is a barrier to giving birth and parenting.

Download 'I didn't think I could have a baby': Toronto pregnancy clinic supports women with disabilities
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:40]


Read two chapters and call me in the morning: The White Coat Black Art book club

Three guests bring a book that touched them personally, and says something important about heath care

Download Read two chapters and call me in the morning: The White Coat Black Art book club
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:46]


Screened Out: Do Canada’s breast cancer screening guidelines put 40-something women at risk?

Twenty percent of women who are diagnosed with breast cancer are in their forties. But Canadian screening guidelines say little about what women at that age should be doing to stay on top of the “big C.” The recently updated recommendations from the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health advise against women 40-49 getting mammograms, and suggest they have a conversation with their doctor to make a ‘shared decision” about screening. They also say women shouldn’t do breast self-exams. The authors of the guidelines say they are based on the best scientific evidence, and that the guidelines help to guard against the significant issue of false positives which cause needless worry and biopsies. But some experts and breast cancer survivors worry that women are getting the wrong message. Lucy Van Oldenbarneveld found a lump when she was 49. She got treatment and survived. Her sister was just 44 when she was diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer. She died last year. Dr. Jean Seely, the head of Breast Imaging at The Ottawa Hospital, is critical of the guidelines. She's leading the charge to inform women about their risks, and what they can do about them. Meanwhile, BC is one of three provinces that deviates from the guidelines. Dr. Goldman visits Dr. Colin Mar at B.C. Cancer to take a look at an online decision aid the province developed to help women understand their risks and make informed choices about breast cancer screening.

Download Screened Out: Do Canada’s breast cancer screening guidelines put 40-something women at risk?
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:39]


Harm reduction

Dr. Brian Goldman talks both as a parent and as a doctor about teenagers and harm reduction. It's a practice that focuses not on abstinence, but minimizing harm and potential danger.

Download Harm reduction
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:53]


'It was terrifying': Teen who collapsed after vaping is now sounding the alarm to her peers

E-cigarettes were heralded as a means to help adult smokers quit. But a recent Health Canada survey found nearly one in four students in grades 7 to 12 have vaped. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, 47 people have died and nearly 2300 cases of vape-related damage have been documented this year. This week we talk to a Halifax teen who tells us how she and her friends started vaping, and how she ended up being treated by paramedics after routinely vaping the equivalent of 2.5 packs of cigarettes a day. Health authorities are not required to track those cases, but incidents involving much more serious lung damage have been reported, including the case of a US teen who required a double lung transplant. Dr. Hassan Nemeh, the surgeon who did that operation tells us what he saw, and what he thinks public health authorities should do.

Download 'It was terrifying': Teen who collapsed after vaping is now sounding the alarm to her peers
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:38]


Certain she was 'bound to die in addiction,' this mum is now drug-free thanks to mother-child rehab program

Quebec-based residential treatment program helps mothers build their confidence and skills as a parent

Download Certain she was 'bound to die in addiction,' this mum is now drug-free thanks to mother-child rehab program
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:37]


From victims to advocates

Dr Brian Goldman takes an unflinching look at how medicine has treated people with developmental disabilities, and what's being done to remedy the cruelty of the past.

Download From victims to advocates
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:42]


Mind on Fire: A Memoir of Madness and Recovery

Award-winning Irish author and playwright Arnold Thomas Fanning sits down with Dr. Brian Goldman to discuss his new book Mind on Fire: A Memoir of Madness and Recovery.

Download Mind on Fire: A Memoir of Madness and Recovery
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:41]


Inuit babies ‘don't have a lobby’: Doctor petitions to expand use of palivizumab against respiratory virus

A petition based on research by Dr. Anna Banerji is calling for Nunavut to expand the use of an antibody to all Inuit babies to protect them against a contagious respiratory virus. But the territory’s health department says it needs “conclusive evidence” to change its policy.

Download Inuit babies ‘don't have a lobby’: Doctor petitions to expand use of palivizumab against respiratory virus
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:38]


Mothering, not morphine best treatment for babies born with opioid addiction

Rooming in allows mothers who are dependent on opioids to bond with newborns experiencing withdrawal, a practice that research says is as effective as putting the infants in the NICU and giving them small doses of morphine.

Download Mothering, not morphine best treatment for babies born with opioid addiction
[mp3 file: runs 00:29:17]


Jay's tablet

Jay DesMazes is bedridden with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). extremely limited movement; Using only eye movement and an ipad, DesMazes assembles words one letter at a time. Through his tablet, Jay tells Dr Brian Goldman about his life and abuse he received at the hands of nurses and health care staff.

Download Jay's tablet
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:58]


Food as Medicine: Some doctors are prescribing a plant based diet to address a host of health ailments

Tofurkey anyone? Two doctors in rural Newfoundland are teaching locals what they need to know about switching to a plant based diet. It's a win-win for their patients who ditch cod and salt beef in favour of tofu and broccoli. Not only are they losing excess pounds, they are also regaining their health.

Download Food as Medicine: Some doctors are prescribing a plant based diet to address a host of health ailments
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:42]


Mentioning the unmentionable

We’re making mention of the common yet often unmentionable problem: pelvic floor dysfunction. Close to 40% of older women are affected by pelvic floor disorders.

Download Mentioning the unmentionable
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Crisis in Caregiving

Canada’s healthcare system is maxed out. In response, 8.1 million Canadians have stepped into the breach to care for ageing family members and loved ones who are chronically-ill or disabled. That allows many with complex care needs to remain in their homes longer. But it's taking a toll. Donna Thomson is a caregiver advocate and co-author of the new book "The Unexpected Journey of Caring." She says families are reaching a breaking point. "There's a big difference between shopping for your mother every once in a while and setting up tube feeds and ventilators. The type of nursing families are expected to take on today is unprecedented and there is no upper limit." She cared for her mother until she died at the age of 96 as well as her son, who has cerebral palsy. During this election many caregivers are calling for a national senior's strategy that recognizes the work caregivers do, and which offers them meaningful support. How politicians respond will sway their votes, says Dr. Samir Sinha. As the head of Geriatrics at Mount Sinai hospital in Toronto, he says we are in a crisis of caregiving. He's talks to Dr. Goldman about why caregiving needs to be a priority on the election agenda and what caregivers most need from their government.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:26:41]


The Trouble with Lyme Disease

Lyme Disease is on the rise in Canada. Despite this, it's not well understood by many physicians and the chronic version of the tick-borne disease remains a controversial diagnosis, making it difficult for patients to get treatment. In this edition, we hear from a a Kemptville, Ont.mother whose toddler got Lyme Disease this summer, medical experts on all sides of the issue as well as Jane Bailey, a Nova Scotia woman who had to leave Canada and spend $50,000 for treatment in the U.S. She's part of a vocal patient movement that's demanding more recognition of Chronic Lyme Disease and more aggressive treatment, which goes beyond the guidelines widely accepted in the medical community. At the heart of the issue is a difference of opinion between medical experts who take very different views of the disease. Dr. Brian Goldman unpacks how the so-called "Lyme Wars" developed and what can be done to help patients who've been caught in the middle.

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