The Current

 
 

The Current

The Current is a meeting place of perspectives, ideas and voices, with a fresh take on issues that affect Canadians today.

Updated: Daily
Download episodes from this podcast for: 3 months
Visit Show Site: http://www.cbc.ca/thecurrent

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Canada’s COVID-19 economic recovery plan

Before Finance Minister Bill Morneau releases a new official deficit estimate Wednesday, we discuss Canada’s COVID-19 recovery plan with Armine Yalnizyan, economist and the Atkinson Fellow On The Future Of Workers, Christopher Ragan, economist and the director of the Max Bell School of Public Policy at McGill University, and John Stackhouse, senior vice president at the Royal Bank of Canada.

Download Canada’s COVID-19 economic recovery plan
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:49]


Last Segways roll off production line

So long Segway. Just as demand for “micro mobility” increases, the last of the two-wheeled, self-balancing personal transporters are rolling off the production line. Technology writer Mark Wilson and former Chief Planner for Vancouver Brent Toderian weigh in.

Download Last Segways roll off production line
[mp3 file: runs 00:13:14]


Reuniting long-term care home residents with their families

Like many people with loved ones in long-term care homes, Wayne Moriarty hasn’t seen his 92-year-old father Paul since March. But with B.C. easing restrictions, he tells guest host Nahlah Ayed that he’s counting down the days. Ayed talks to Moriarty, as well as Esther Hladkowicz, and Laura Tamblyn Watts of CanAge, about reuniting families, and the essential care their visits bring.

Download Reuniting long-term care home residents with their families
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:45]


CBC’s What on Earth explores climate change fight

CBC Radio host Laura Lynch tells us about What on Earth, her new radio program dedicated entirely to investigating climate change: its impacts and potential solutions.

Download CBC’s What on Earth explores climate change fight
[mp3 file: runs 00:09:27]


How effective are mandatory mask policies?

To fight COVID-19, it will soon be mandatory for millions of Canadians to wear masks in certain situations. Dr. Amy Tan and Dr. Mustafa Hirji discuss the effectiveness of mandatory mask policies.

Download How effective are mandatory mask policies?
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:21]


U.S. surge of COVID-19 cases

A spike in new COVID-19 cases is forcing some U.S. states to roll back their reopening plans, but as Fourth of July looms, many beaches and attractions are staying open. We talk to business owners and health-care workers on the front lines.

Download U.S. surge of COVID-19 cases
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:02]


Russian referendum gives President Vladimir Putin sweeping new powers

A referendum in Russia has given Vladimir Putin a series of sweeping new powers — including a provision that would allow him to hold on to Russia's presidency until 2036. We talk to Catherine Belton, author of Putin's People: How the KGB Took Back Russia and Then Took on the West.

Download Russian referendum gives President Vladimir Putin sweeping new powers
[mp3 file: runs 00:14:44]


National affairs panel on the year so far

Even before the pandemic, 2020 was already a tumultuous year for Canada, from Wet'suwet'en to the Ukrainian airline and Nova Scotia tragedies. Our national affairs panel — Vaughn Palmer, provincial affairs political columnist for the Vancouver Sun; journalist and author Tanya Talaga is an award-winning journalist; and Emilie Nicolas, columnist for Le Devoir — will be here to reflect on where we've been, and how we go forward.

Download National affairs panel on the year so far
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:59]


New Canadians on coming to Canada

This year, July 1 won't be like past Canada Days. But one thing that stays the same are the thousands of people who choose to make Canada their home each year. We hear what new Canadians have to say about what it means to be Canadian. 

Download New Canadians on coming to Canada
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:21]


Journalist Maria Konnikova on what poker taught her about life

She was a writer with a PhD in psychology who never played a hand of Texas Hold'em in her life. A year later, she was a poker champion. Maria Konnikova speaks with guest host Rosemary Barton about her new book, The Biggest Bluff, and what she learned from the game.

Download Journalist Maria Konnikova on what poker taught her about life
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:29]


Andre Picard on migrant workers and COVID-19 spikes in the U.S.

The Globe and Mail's Andre Picard joins us to discuss the spike in COVID-19 cases in the U.S., migrant workers and outbreaks in Canada and how this country is doing when it comes to slowing the spread.

Download Andre Picard on migrant workers and COVID-19 spikes in the U.S.
[mp3 file: runs 00:10:16]


Global medical oxygen shortages

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, the WHO has warned that there is a global oxygen shortage. Now, experts are calling on health leaders around the world to get medical oxygen to countries who desperately need it — but it’s not just COVID-19 causing the shortages. Dr. Steve Adudans is CEO of Hewa Tele in Kenya and helping source the much-needed supply. Leith Greenslade is a global health activist and coordinator of Every Breath Counts Coalition.

Download Global medical oxygen shortages
[mp3 file: runs 00:17:17]


Facebook ad boycott

Starbucks, Lululemon and MEC are among a growing list of brands pulling ads from Facebook over hate speech. But will this boycott make a real difference to Facebook's bottom line? We speak with Jessica Gonzalez, co-CEO of Free Press, one of the organizations behind Stop Hate For Profit; Taylor Owen, who studies media and democracy at McGill University; and Shoshana Wodinsky, an enterprise reporter for Gizmodo.

Download Facebook ad boycott
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:27]


Facial recognition and race

We look at the growing calls to ban facial recognition technology from police work with Phil Mayor, senior staff attorney with ACLU Michigan, and Deborah Raji, tech fellow and the AI Now Institute at NYU. We also hear why some believe you shouldn’t paint all facial recognition technology with the same brush with Daniel Castro, vice president of the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation.

Download Facial recognition and race
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:36]


Sask. family pushes for greater anti-racism efforts in schools

Their son Kaleab died by suicide after experiencing racist bullying at this school. Now, Sandra Barker-Schmidt and Dean Schmidt share how they hope their son's name will stand for stronger anti-racism action in Saskatchewan schools.

Download Sask. family pushes for greater anti-racism efforts in schools
[mp3 file: runs 00:21:35]


Celebrating Pride at home with a curbside drag show

COVID-19 changed Pride celebrations around the country, and events like drag performances have found new homes — like suburban driveways north of Toronto. Rachel Matlow visited the neighbourhood to catch the show starring Joshua Petrie, aka Jessyca Prosecco.

Download Celebrating Pride at home with a curbside drag show
[mp3 file: runs 00:06:48]


The Lancet's Richard Horton on government responses to COVID-19

It's been nearly six months since health authorities in Wuhan, China, alerted the WHO to an unusual new form of pneumonia. Richard Horton, editor of medical journal The Lancet and author of The COVID-19 Catastrophe: What's Gone Wrong and How to Stop It Happening Again, shares why he feels governments around the world have bungled the response to COVID-19.

Download The Lancet's Richard Horton on government responses to COVID-19
[mp3 file: runs 00:17:51]


John Bolton on Trump & Trudeau, Huawei and the president's bid for re-election

U.S. President Donald Trump tried to block its release, but former National Security Advisor John Bolton's memoir, The Room Where It Happened: A White House Memoir, was published Tuesday. He spoke with The Current's Matt Galloway in his first Canadian interview.

Download John Bolton on Trump & Trudeau, Huawei and the president's bid for re-election
[mp3 file: runs 00:21:48]


National Affairs Panel on Canada’s foreign policy

What is this country's foreign policy in 2020, and what should it be? Our National Affairs Panel — including Ben Rowswell, president of the Canadian International Council and former Ambassador to Venezuela; Lynette Ong, China expert at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy at the University of Toronto; and Robert Fowler, Canada's longest-serving ambassador to the United Nations — weigh in.

Download National Affairs Panel on Canada’s foreign policy
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:19]


Andre Picard on rising COVID-19 cases among young people and reopening

We check in with Globe and Mail health columnist André Picard about rising COVID-19 cases among young people, the two-metre rule and testing as Canada begins to re-open.

Download Andre Picard on rising COVID-19 cases among young people and reopening
[mp3 file: runs 00:08:22]


The return of sports during a pandemic

Do you miss sports? Many do. In the midst of a pandemic, and a reckoning over anti-Black racism, sports leagues are trying to figure out how to come back. What is the place, if any, of sports in the world we're in now? Toronto Star journalist Bruce Arthur and The Athletic’s Kavitha Davidson discuss.

Download The return of sports during a pandemic
[mp3 file: runs 00:18:24]


Mental health and police wellness checks

Journalist Anna Mehler Paperny has been on the receiving end of police wellness checks. She says overhauling the response won't be easy or obvious, but we owe it to each other to find a more caring way. We discuss how to move forward with CAMH psychiatrist and Wellesley Institute CEO Dr. Kwame McKenzie and Jennifer Lavoie, associate professor in criminology at Wilfred Laurier University.

Download Mental health and police wellness checks
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:20]


Freeing the two Michaels

Several Canadian legal experts say more can be done to free the two Michaels — Michael Spavor and Kovrig — who are detained in China. We speak with former Justice Minister Allan Rock who recently presented the government with a legal opinion that says the government can stop the extradition proceedings of Meng Wanzhou, and Charles Burton, senior fellow with the Macdonald Laurier Institute.

Download Freeing the two Michaels
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:24]


COVID-19 and children in care

COVID-19 restrictions have kept children in care from seeing their birth parents for months. We discuss what can be learned about foster care from the pandemic.

Download COVID-19 and children in care
[mp3 file: runs 00:17:04]


Wil Fundal on new CBC podcast They & Us

In their new podcast, They & Us, Wil Fundal answers questions about gender identity, pronouns and trans rights — and explores their own experience as a non-binary person. Fundal joins us to talk about what launching the podcast means in this moment.

Download Wil Fundal on new CBC podcast They & Us
[mp3 file: runs 00:09:14]


Racism in education

An independent investigation found that black students were singled out for suspensions and expulsions more than most at the Peel District School Board — sometimes for wearing hoodies or hoop earrings. We speak with trustee Kathy McDonald, who is pushing for change, and researcher Carl James who is looking at racism in education broadly.

Download Racism in education
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:00]


COVID-19 cases among young Albertans

Experts say new public health strategies are needed to help stem COVID-19 cases among young people. We hear from a young Edmontonian about the spike in his city, and two epidemiologists — Judith Malmgren at the University of Washington and Craig Jenne, associate professor at the University of Calgary.

Download COVID-19 cases among young Albertans
[mp3 file: runs 00:18:24]


Mentoring black graduates

Toronto-area school boards have started a pilot project hiring graduation coaches, specifically for Black students. Jonatan Fuentes is one of them, and he tells us about what students can expect from the program.

Download Mentoring black graduates
[mp3 file: runs 00:11:05]


The Fix: Regenerative ocean farming

On our latest installment of The Fix, we hear from Newfoundland-born Bren Smith. He's growing something special on his regenerative ocean farm, and the process is a promising fix to some of the biggest problems out there today.

Download The Fix: Regenerative ocean farming
[mp3 file: runs 00:16:24]


Threats against public health officials in the U.S.

Theresa Anselmo, head of the Colorado Association of Local Public Health Officials, worries that threats targeting the 53 public health officials she works with could lead to a mass exodus of staff. We hear why.

Download Threats against public health officials in the U.S.
[mp3 file: runs 00:06:00]


Re-thinking police wellness checks

What will it take to make it safer when people in mental health crisis interact with police? Ejaz Choudhry's nephew, Hassan Choudhary, speaks about his uncle's death at the hands of Peel Regional Police — and what it says about how police handle wellness checks. And we hear from Edmonton Police Service inspector and doctoral student Dan Jones, as well as Meenakshi Mannoe, criminalization and policing campaigner with Pivot Legal Society.

Download Re-thinking police wellness checks
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:59]


Commemorating Iranian students

The University of Alberta has awarded posthumous degrees to five students killed when Iran shot down Flight PS752 in January. We hear from Asal Andarzipour, who calls it an act of "remembrance" for her five peers.

Download Commemorating Iranian students
[mp3 file: runs 00:05:48]


Road trips during the pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic has ground most travel to a halt, but many Canadians are trying out RVs to get out and explore their provinces. Buckle up! We're taking a road trip.

Download Road trips during the pandemic
[mp3 file: runs 00:12:45]


Checking in on coronavirus treatments

Canadian researchers say they are learning about possible treatments for COVID-19 faster than ever before because of the knowledge they gained from previous outbreaks, but there is still no approved treatment in Canada. We check in on the research with Dr. Rob Fowler, senior scientist at Sunnybrook Research Institute and Matthias Götte, professor and chair of the Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology at University of Alberta.

Download Checking in on coronavirus treatments
[mp3 file: runs 00:13:19]


Mandatory mask laws

A few municipalities in Canada are bringing in mandatory rules on face masks, but a group of Canadian doctors wants to see more. We hear from Dr. Jennifer Kwan on the efforts of #Masks4Canada

Download Mandatory mask laws
[mp3 file: runs 00:10:30]


Families of long-term care residents worried about proposed immunity from COVID-19 lawsuits

The Ontario government is considering a move to grant organizations and people immunity from some COVID-19 lawsuits. Families suing long-term care homes fear it could make accountability that much harder to come by.

Download Families of long-term care residents worried about proposed immunity from COVID-19 lawsuits
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:17]


Pandemic mental health

Three months into this pandemic, how are you feeling? As the abnormal becomes a new normal, we check in on our anxiety with Dr. Roger McIntyre, and hear some ideas on developing mental resilience from writer Eva Holland.

Download Pandemic mental health
[mp3 file: runs 00:18:00]


Previewing the new CBC podcast World on Fire

‪When your backyard is burning — is anywhere safe? A new podcast from CBC Edmonton explores the growing problem of wildfires, threatening our homes and livelihoods.

Download Previewing the new CBC podcast World on Fire
[mp3 file: runs 00:09:12]


National Affairs panel: Conservative leadership contest

After two debates, is the landscape any clearer on who could lead the Conservative Party? We turn to our national affairs panel — western correspondent for Maclean's magazine Jason Markusoff, Ottawa bureau chief for Huffington Post Canada Athia Raj, and columnist with the Hill Times and co-host of the Bad & Bitchy podcast Erica Ifill.

Download National Affairs panel: Conservative leadership contest
[mp3 file: runs 00:17:58]


Two Michaels charged in China

The two Canadians detained for months in China, Michael Spavor and Michael Kovrig, have now been charged by Chinese authorities with espionage. The Globe and Mail’s Beijing correspondent Nathan VanderKlippe discusses the implications, including how the men could face life in prison if convicted.

Download Two Michaels charged in China
[mp3 file: runs 00:06:13]


Author Bakari Sellers on the importance of Juneteenth

Friday is Juneteenth, the day the last U.S. slaves were freed. Author and political analyst Bakari Sellers joins Matt Galloway to discuss why the struggle for Black freedom isn't over. Sellers traces the fight in his own family — from his father, shot in the Orangeburg Massacre, to his own daughter joining Black Lives Matter marches today.

Download Author Bakari Sellers on the importance of Juneteenth
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:29]


Celebrating the post-secondary Class of 2020

We honour the country's post-secondary graduates! The COVID-19 pandemic has put traditional graduation ceremonies on hold, so we're hosting a virtual celebration through the power of radio.

Download Celebrating the post-secondary Class of 2020
[mp3 file: runs 00:52:39]


Phillipine journalist Maria Ressa on her 'cyber libel' conviction and press freedom

Phillipine journalist and Rappler CEO & Executive Editor Maria Ressa was found guilty of cyber libel by a court in Manila this week. Ressa speaks with Matt Galloway about what the conviction could mean for the future of journalism, both in her country and abroad.

Download Phillipine journalist Maria Ressa on her 'cyber libel' conviction and press freedom
[mp3 file: runs 00:18:03]


Confronting racism at every level can start with young people, says Masai Ujiri

Toronto Raptors president Masai Ujiri says 'there seems to be something different in the air this time,' amid protests over the murder of George Floyd and systemic racism.

Download Confronting racism at every level can start with young people, says Masai Ujiri
[mp3 file: runs 00:18:11]


Introducing Uncover: Dead Wrong

The latest season of Uncover: Dead Wrong dives deep into a botched police investigation, missing evidence, and a wrongful conviction in a city plagued with more than a hundred unsolved missing and murdered cases. Dead Wrong takes you through the twisting, unbelievable story of Glen Assoun who spent more than 17 years in prison for the murder of Brenda Way, a crime he did not commit, and asks who really killed Brenda? More episodes are available at http://hyperurl.co/uncovercbc

Download Introducing Uncover: Dead Wrong
[mp3 file: runs 00:45:45]


Celebrating the high school Class of 2020

In the first of two specials, we celebrate the young people graduating from high schools, and heading out into the world in these very strange times. With normal festivities on ice due to the pandemic, we want to honour some impressive young Canadians, who defied the odds, and gave back to their community.

Download Celebrating the high school Class of 2020
[mp3 file: runs 00:50:48]


Canadian trumpet prodigy William Leathers

When Mississauga teen and trumpet prodigy William Leathers won a place at New York’s prestigious Juilliard School in 2018, crowdfunders stepped in to help him cover the first two years of his $91k tuition. Now as he heads into his third year, he has some exciting news.

Download Canadian trumpet prodigy William Leathers
[mp3 file: runs 00:08:39]


Health columnist André Picard

Health columnist André Picard says the increase in overdose deaths in B.C. shows that COVID-19 isn’t the only public health crisis we should be paying attention to.

Download Health columnist André Picard
[mp3 file: runs 00:07:43]


COVID-19 in Latin America’s ‘red zone’

Brazil now has the second-highest COVID19 death toll in the world. We discuss why the WHO has declared a new "red zone" in Latin America.

Download COVID-19 in Latin America’s ‘red zone’
[mp3 file: runs 00:16:21]


Indigenous-led police services

Amid calls for police reform, some advocates are pointing to the work of Indigenous-led police services as one way to improve relations with marginalized communities. We hear from Terry McCaffrey, president of the Indigenous Police Chiefs of Ontario; James Favel, executive director of Winnipeg-based Bear Clan Patrol; and Rick Ruddell, a justice studies professor at the University of Regina.

Download Indigenous-led police services
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:48]


Sami Tamimi and Tara Wigley on their new cookbook Falastin

Authors Sami Tamimi and Tara Wigley discuss how their new cookbook Falastin explores the tastes of Palestinian culture, and the pandemic’s toll on the restaurant business.

Download Sami Tamimi and Tara Wigley on their new cookbook Falastin
[mp3 file: runs 00:18:18]


Policing oversight

With anger over police shootings beyond the boiling point, we discuss the calls for greater oversight, and who is actually policing the police.

Download Policing oversight
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:04]


Banff Centre layoffs

The Banff Centre, one of the key laboratories for nurturing the next generation of Canadian artists, has laid off most of its staff. We hear why so many in the arts community are worried about the Centre's future.

Download Banff Centre layoffs
[mp3 file: runs 00:09:37]


Overdose deaths rise during pandemi

70 people died from drug overdoses in B.C. in May alone, more than have died of COVID-19 in the province during the entire pandemic. Donald MacPherson, executive director of the Canadian Drug Policy Coalition, talks to Matt Galloway about what’s fuelling the crisis.

Download Overdose deaths rise during pandemi
[mp3 file: runs 00:12:13]


Mary Ito moved into a seniors' home to care for her parents. Within days they died, and she too had COVID-19

When CBC host Mary Ito got a call saying her mother might have COVID-19, she made a quick decision — to move into their residential home to care for both her parents, aged 92 and 97. It's not a decision she regrets.

Download Mary Ito moved into a seniors' home to care for her parents. Within days they died, and she too had COVID-19
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:52]


The whiteness of celebrity food culture

Celebrity foodies embrace ingredients from around the world — but not always the people. We talk to Canadian food critics Navneet Alang, Chantal Braganza and Eden Hagos about the whiteness of food culture.

Download The whiteness of celebrity food culture
[mp3 file: runs 00:18:23]


A COVID-19 spike in the U.S. and how Kingston, Ont. is beating the virus

There’s a spike in COVID-19 cases in the US, particularly in rural areas that had so far escaped the worst. But meanwhile in Canada, Kingston, Ont., is reporting zero cases. That’s no mean feat for a region of more than 200,000 people with many long-term care homes. We talk to people at these two extremes of the pandemic.

Download A COVID-19 spike in the U.S. and how Kingston, Ont. is beating the virus
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:59]


Facing up to racist history in our statues and street names

Anti-racism protesters threw a statue of slave trader Edward Colston into Bristol harbour at the weekend, and highlighted who cities choose to celebrate in our monuments and street names. Matt Galloway talks to Professor David Olusoga and Professor Afua Cooper about the history all around us and whether it’s time for a rethink.

Download Facing up to racist history in our statues and street names
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:21]


COVID-19 and the hit to tourism within Canada

Many of us are dreaming about a summer getaway — maybe a great Canadian road trip — but with COVID-19 restrictions limiting travel within the country, what will tourism look like this year?

Download COVID-19 and the hit to tourism within Canada
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:24]


Investigating the cold case death of Swedish PM Olof Palme

Swedish prosecutors have closed the case on who killed the country’s former prime minister, Olof Palme, in 1986. But not everyone thinks justice has been done — we speak to Goran Bjorkdahl about what he’s uncovered about the case.

Download Investigating the cold case death of Swedish PM Olof Palme
[mp3 file: runs 00:11:30]


‘Alarm fatigue’ may be the reason you’re washing your hands less

Are you finding it tough to keep up with changing COVID-19 guidelines? Something called "caution fatigue" could be to blame. ER doctor Andrew Petrosoniak and psychologist Dr. Jacqueline Gollan explain the phenomenon.

Download ‘Alarm fatigue’ may be the reason you’re washing your hands less
[mp3 file: runs 00:12:40]


Police culture and racism in the ranks

Having faced discrimination himself, former RCMP officer Alain Babineau says Black officers have been talking about racism within police forces for years. He believes change can happen, but it will take external pressure to get there. Police culture researcher Lesley Bikos explains the barriers to reform.

Download Police culture and racism in the ranks
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:58]


COVID-19 pushes virtual healthcare into the mainstream

Alberta has decided to make virtual health care a permanent option. Should other provinces and territories do the same? Women's College Hospital Chief Medical Innovation Officer Sacha Bhatia weighs in.

Download COVID-19 pushes virtual healthcare into the mainstream
[mp3 file: runs 00:12:10]


National affairs panel on CERB penalties

The federal government will table a bill to crack down on fraudulent CERB applications Wednesday. Our national affairs panel — HuffPost Ottawa bureau chief Althia Raj, columnist Kady O’Malley and economist Erica Ifill — is in to explain what that could mean for Canadians.

Download National affairs panel on CERB penalties
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:30]


Anti-Black racism in Canada

Amid protests and growing calls for change after George Floyd's death, are we at a turning point for anti-Black racism in Canada and the U.S.? Poet El Jones, racial justice lawyer Anthony Morgan and author Esi Edugyan join Matt Galloway for a discussion on racial injustice in Canada.

Download Anti-Black racism in Canada
[mp3 file: runs 00:32:00]


COVID-19: Can social bubbles reduce spread? And André Picard on lifting long-term care lockdowns

Should you bubble with family, or hang out with your neighbours? We hear from University of Oxford Professor Per Block about his research into easing COVID-19 restrictions, and what strategies might work best. Then, the Globe and Mail's health columnist André Picard argues that lifting long-term care lockdowns should be part of COVID-19 reopening.

Download COVID-19: Can social bubbles reduce spread? And André Picard on lifting long-term care lockdowns
[mp3 file: runs 00:18:58]


The New Yorker’s Jill Lepore on her new podcast

As the world awaits a vaccine for COVID-19, the New Yorker's Jill Lepore takes a look back at how the polio vaccine changed the course of history. She joins Matt Galloway to discuss her new podcast, The Last Archive.

Download The New Yorker’s Jill Lepore on her new podcast
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:06]


Toronto city councillors call to cut police budget

Two Toronto city councillors are calling for a reduction to the police department budget. Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam discusses what that means for the movement to defund the police — and we hear from Tom Stamatakis on how the Canadian Police Association is responding.

Download Toronto city councillors call to cut police budget
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:33]


Richard Haass on making history

It sometimes feels like there is too much history coming too fast. To help us understand the meaning of this moment, we hear from Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Affairs and author of The World: A Brief Introduction.

Download Richard Haass on making history
[mp3 file: runs 00:14:07]


Breaking down barriers with bhangra dance

Bhangra dancer Gurdeep Pandher believes that dance can help break down barriers and shine light on a dark time. Thanks to the pandemic, his classes have migrated online — and hundreds of people are participating.

Download Breaking down barriers with bhangra dance
[mp3 file: runs 00:09:51]


COVID-19 and child abuse

Wendy Carr and Irwin Elman say we need to do more to protect children in abusive situations, especially when some ways to spot abuse, like schools, are closed during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Download COVID-19 and child abuse
[mp3 file: runs 00:15:59]


The problem with police taking a knee

Some police and politicians are taking a knee amidst anti-racism protests around the U.S. and Canada. University of Toronto Black diaspora professor Rinaldo Walcott explains how the gesture can be dangerous, and why it dilutes the movement against police violence.

Download The problem with police taking a knee
[mp3 file: runs 00:06:51]


Mourning in the Black community

A public visitation for George Floyd will be held today, with a funeral tomorrow. We discuss the importance of mourning and grief for the black community with Kami Fletcher, a professor at Albright College, and Nyle Fort, a minister, activist and a PhD candidate in religious studies at Princeton University.

Download Mourning in the Black community
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:55]


Marc-Andre Blanchard on Canada’s bid for a security council seat

Is time running out on Canada’s bid for a seat on the UN security council? We talk to Canada’s permanent representative to the UN Marc-Andre Blanchard.

Download Marc-Andre Blanchard on Canada’s bid for a security council seat
[mp3 file: runs 00:09:47]


Sona Mohapatra’s boundary-pushing career

We talk to Indian music superstar Sona Mohapatra about the new documentary on her boundary-pushing career. It’s called Shut Up Sona, but she has no intention.

Download Sona Mohapatra’s boundary-pushing career
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:44]


Slow COVID-19 infection rates across Africa

Infection rates of COVID-19 are slower across Africa than in the rest of the world. We ask Dr. Ahmed Ogwell, deputy director of the African Centres for Disease Control, why that might be.

Download Slow COVID-19 infection rates across Africa
[mp3 file: runs 00:13:39]


Indigenous communities and police violence

A series of violent interactions between police and members of the Indigenous community have sparked outrage and concern. We speak to advocates and legal experts about the systemic issues behind the violence and the lives affected.

Download Indigenous communities and police violence
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:52]


Farm workers and COVID-19

Hundreds of farm workers have now tested positive for COVID-19, and a 31-year-old migrant worker died Saturday. We discuss how to protect the people growing our food.

Download Farm workers and COVID-19
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:06]


The Afghan films that survived the Taliban

When the Taliban took power in Afghanistan, anything blasphemous — books, art — was burned. But a treasure trove of film survived, dating back to the earliest days of cinema. We talk to director Ariel Nasr, who has made the surviving pictures the subject of his documentary, The Forbidden Reel.

Download The Afghan films that survived the Taliban
[mp3 file: runs 00:13:56]


Disabled people feel left behind in pandemic supports

Three months into the pandemic, there is frustration among people with disabilities that they’re getting left behind by government programs. We talk to people living with disabilities about support, employment opportunities, and what needs to change.

Download Disabled people feel left behind in pandemic supports
[mp3 file: runs 00:12:41]


Accusations of inaction after MMIWG inquiry

A year after the final report of the MMIWG inquiry, families say the lack of federal action is another broken promise. We talk to Meggie Cywink, a special advisor and liaison for families during the inquiry, and Nahanni Fontaine, the NDP MLA for St. Johns in Manitoba. Matt Galloway also asks Minister of Crown and Indigenous Relations Carolyn Bennett to explain the delay.

Download Accusations of inaction after MMIWG inquiry
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:09]


Vancouver Island man grieves brother and cousin killed in Chicago

Dionte Jelks is originally from Chicago, but now lives with his wife and three boys on Vancouver Island, where he works as a school principal. Jelks’ brother and cousin were shot and killed in Chicago on Sunday, but the combination of the unrest and the COVID-19 pandemic means he can’t return home to grieve with his family.

Download Vancouver Island man grieves brother and cousin killed in Chicago
[mp3 file: runs 00:06:54]


Democracy and protests in U.S.

Is democracy under threat in America? National Review columnist John Fund and Professor of History Ruth Ben-Ghiat discuss.

Download Democracy and protests in U.S.
[mp3 file: runs 00:12:49]


National affairs panel on political response to anti-racism protests

Our national affairs panellists weigh in on anti-racism protests and the response from politicians. We talk to Niigaan Sinclair, columnist for The Winnipeg Free Press; Susan Delacourt, national columnist for The Toronto Star; and Le Devoir columnist Emilie Nicolas.

Download National affairs panel on political response to anti-racism protests
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Disinformation online about the unrest

Jane Lytvynenko, a senior reporter at Buzzfeed News, explains how to sort fact from fiction in the stream of information coming out of these protests.

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Philadelphia-based activist on protests in her city

Jadé, an activist in Philadelphia, tells The Current's Matt Galloway about what she saw in the thick of protests this week.

Download Philadelphia-based activist on protests in her city
[mp3 file: runs 00:07:27]


Ottawa Police Chief Peter Sloly on calls to defund police services

At the root of the current Black Lives Matter protests in Canada and the United States is a chasm of mistrust between many in black communities and the police. Ottawa Police Chief Peter Sloly discusses calls for policing reform, and how trust might be rebuilt.

Download Ottawa Police Chief Peter Sloly on calls to defund police services
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Are U.S. protests a turning point in black lives?

Is this moment a turning point in the history of black lives? We talk to veterans in the struggle for black rights: Professor Carol Anderson, justice reform activist Frank Chapman and writer and organizer Charlene Carruthers.

Download Are U.S. protests a turning point in black lives?
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Legacy of Silver Donald Cameron

Journalist and environmentalist Silver Donald Cameron died Monday. His long-time colleague Linden MacIntyre joins us to reflect on his legacy.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:04:12]


Suzanne Crocker’s film First We Eat

Heard of the 100-mile diet, where you only eat food produced locally? Suzanne Crocker tried it with her family for a year in the Yukon, where options within a hundred miles were even more limited. She joins us to discuss the experience, and her new film about it, First We Eat.

Download Suzanne Crocker’s film First We Eat
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Preserving the pandemic for future generations

How do you record a moment in history while it’s still happening all around you? We hear from a Canadian museum starting to gather the artifacts and stories that'll help tell the story of COVID-19.

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André Picard on COVID-19 and anti-racism protests

Globe and Mail health columnist André Picard discusses the latest pandemic news, and argues that racism itself is a public health risk.

Download André Picard on COVID-19 and anti-racism protests
[mp3 file: runs 00:08:57]


Racism in Canada and the U.S.

After a weekend of protest across Canada and the U.S., we start today by discussing racism on both sides of the border, and the impact it has on people’s daily lives.

Download Racism in Canada and the U.S.
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Open letter calls on Quebec Premier to join front lines in long-term care homes

In an open letter, law student and former CBC journalist Ryan Hicks has called on Quebec Premier François Legault to join him on the front lines fighting COVID-19 in a long-term care home in Montreal. He tells us what the premier would see if he takes up the offer.

Download Open letter calls on Quebec Premier to join front lines in long-term care homes
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Trump versus social media companies

Siva Vaidyanathan discusses Twitter and Facebook’s very different responses to recent posts from U.S. President Donald Trump, including words that were deemed to glorify violence. He weighs up whether Trump's recent executive order — aimed at controlling social media companies — has any teeth.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:11:31]


Political fallout of long-term care reports; Ricky L. Jones on America’s problem with white supremacy; Director Steve James on City So Real; How a choir helping dementia patients is overcoming pandemic restrictions

What are the political repercussions of the military’s damning reports on long-term care homes? We ask our national affairs panel: CBC senior reporter on Parliament Hill Salimah Shivji, Queen's Park bureau chief for the Toronto Star Robert Benzie, and the Montreal Gazette’s Aaron Derfel. Then, the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man in police custody in Minneapolis, has sparked days of protests in the U.S. We talk to Dr. Ricky L Jones about why America needs to have a frank discussion about white supremacy. Plus, five months ago, Hamed Esmaeilion lost his wife and daughter when Iran shot down flight PS 752. He tells us families are still fighting for answers, and we talk to Ralph Goodale, who has been appointed as a special adviser on the crash to the federal government. Also, we hear from Steve James — acclaimed director of Hoop Dreams — about his new four-part docuseries about Chicago, City So Real. Finally, Vancouver’s Voices In Motion was created to see if singing in a choir could tell us more about how music interacts with the effects of dementia in the brain. The pandemic has stopped their gatherings, but they’re still finding ways to bring people together, and bring people back.

Download Political fallout of long-term care reports; Ricky L. Jones on America’s problem with white supremacy; Director Steve James on City So Real; How a choir helping dementia patients is overcoming pandemic restrictions
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Canada and China’s complicated relationship; David Frum on Trump’s re-election bid; Calgary teens set up joke hotline for seniors; Should for-profit model of long-term care be replaced?

What does the Meng Wanzhou decision mean for relations with China, and the two Canadians, Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, currently being held there? We talk to Rob Malley, who worked with Michael Kovrig, and ex-CSIS director Richard Fadden. Then, is U.S. President Donald Trump’s re-election bid in trouble? David Frum thinks it might be. He explains why, and weighs in on the president’s week of spreading conspiracy theories about his political opponents. Plus, heard the one about the Calgary students who wanted to cheer up seniors feeling isolated during the pandemic? They started a joke hotline! (No, really). Grade 12 student Jared Quinn tells us about the Joy4All project. And after reports of appalling conditions in facilities, there are calls to end the for-profit model of long-term care. Henry Tomaszewski's mom and aunt died in care, he joins us to discuss the changes he wants to see.

Download Canada and China’s complicated relationship; David Frum on Trump’s re-election bid; Calgary teens set up joke hotline for seniors; Should for-profit model of long-term care be replaced?
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Disturbing report on long-term care home conditions; Concerns over rushing COVID-19 vaccine; Calls for an inquiry into Nova Scotia mass shooting

Soldiers deployed to shore up staffing at Ontario long-term care homes have made shocking reports about the conditions they saw in five facilities, including cockroaches, reused syringes, and residents left in soiled diapers. After years of warning signs, is this finally the moment for change? Then, with the accelerated search for a COVID-19 vaccine, some experts warn corners are being cut. We talk to William Haseltine and Françoise Baylis about the concerns. Plus, Premier of Nova Scotia Stephen McNeil joins us to discuss calls for an inquiry into the mass shooting that killed 22 people in April. Some want answers about how the RCMP handled the attack, but the premier says there are jurisdictional issues.

Download Disturbing report on long-term care home conditions; Concerns over rushing COVID-19 vaccine; Calls for an inquiry into Nova Scotia mass shooting
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How provinces differ on COVID-19 testing; Rural internet access; André Picard on public gatherings; Frustration over refunds for cancelled flights

As Ontario revamps its COVID-19 testing plans, we discuss where provinces are going right — or wrong — and what they can learn from each other. Then, it's a very different lockdown if you don’t have a robust internet connection, as many rural Canadians don’t. We hear from people struggling to get online, as well as an advocate for greater access, and ask Rural Economic Development Minister Maryam Monsef about the country’s digital divide. Plus, The Globe and Mail’s health columnist André Picard argues that the shame game isn't the answer to people gathering in parks, and discusses what needs to happen around testing. And finally, we hear from Canadians frustrated about how the airline industry is handling refunds for cancelled flights, and what the federal government is doing about it.

Download How provinces differ on COVID-19 testing; Rural internet access; André Picard on public gatherings; Frustration over refunds for cancelled flights
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Introducing Season 3 of Other People’s Problems

On Season 3 of Other People’s Problems, host Hillary McBride takes you where microphones rarely go, into her therapy office where her clients hurt, heal, and ultimately thrive. This is what people sound like when they talk with someone they trust about difficult childhoods, ongoing mental health struggles, and the sudden changes we’re all facing right now living through a pandemic. Here’s the first bonus episode of Season 3 of the CBC podcast, Other People’s Problems. More episodes are available at hyperurl.co/otherpeoplesproblems

Download Introducing Season 3 of Other People’s Problems
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WHO special advisor Peter A. Singer on agency’s pandemic response, Reopening Italy, Kids write about lockdown, and end of life planning spurred by COVID-19

As COVID-19 spread around the world, so did questions about whether the World Health Organization could have done more to contain it, as well as accusations from U.S. President Donald Trump that the organization was under undue influence from China. Guest host Rosemary Barton puts those questions to Peter A. Singer, special adviser to the director general of the WHO. Then, Italy eased lockdown almost three weeks ago, and a declining death toll suggests social distancing, mask wearing and hand washing is working. Rome correspondent Megan Williams brings to the streets of the Eternal City for an update on the end of lockdown measures. Plus, Jeni Armstrong created the website The Kids Write because she wanted to give children a place to describe their experiences during COVID. Now kids from around the world are contributing — and we hear one of their stories. And finally, it’s not an easy thing to talk about, but the pandemic is spurring more people to discuss their end-of-life plans with their loved ones. We hear how some people are having that conversation.

Download WHO special advisor Peter A. Singer on agency’s pandemic response, Reopening Italy, Kids write about lockdown, and end of life planning spurred by COVID-19
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WHO special advisor Peter A. Singer on agency’s pandemic response

As COVID-19 spread around the world, so did questions about whether the World Health Organization could have done more to contain it, as well as accusations from U.S. President Donald Trump that the organization was under undue influence from China. Guest host Rosemary Barton puts those questions to Peter A. Singer, special adviser to the director general of the WHO.

Download WHO special advisor Peter A. Singer on agency’s pandemic response
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Limited childcare risks a ‘she-cession’; Calls to decentralize meat processing after COVID-19; Saskatchewan Roughriders superfan; Zoo animals wondering where all the noisy humans went

The economy is slowly reopening, but many childcare options aren’t — forcing some working moms to choose between work and taking care of the kids. If that choice falls on working moms, it’s bad news for the economy and could mean a “she-cession,” says economist Armine Yalnizyan. Then, meat processing plants have become COVID-19 epicentres, exposing the weaknesses in that part of the food chain. We discuss calls to revamp and address the problems around how meat is produced, and solutions like buying local, and decentralizing production. Plus, the Grey Cup won’t be held in Regina this year, a big blow for diehard Roughriders fans who “bleed green.” We talk to a superfan about what the sport means for her and her family. And finally, how are zoos adapting to the pandemic? Dolf DeJong tells us about a drive-through safari at the Toronto Zoo — imagine a drive-in, but with giraffes, not movies — and Dr. Ellen Williams says after our sudden disappearance, some animals may be suffering separation anxiety.

Download Limited childcare risks a ‘she-cession’; Calls to decentralize meat processing after COVID-19; Saskatchewan Roughriders superfan; Zoo animals wondering where all the noisy humans went
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Dr. Bonnie Henry on COVID-19’s second wave; Path to a vaccine; Calling incel violence terrorism; Hawksley Workman wants to write a song about your pet

B.C.'s provincial health officer, Dr. Bonnie Henry, talks to Matt Galloway about the likelihood of a second wave of COVID-19, and how lessons learned so far will help Canadians to be ready. Then, we talk to a panel of experts about the progress being made in the search for a vaccine, and whether the public should temper expectations. Plus, police say the killing of a woman at a Toronto massage parlour in February was an act of terrorism, carried out by a 17-year-old who identified as an involuntary celibate, also known as an incel. Legal scholar Amanda Dale and former national security analyst Stephanie Carvin discuss the decision to label the violence as terrorism, and a case that some are calling a watershed moment for dealing with violence against women. And finally, Canadian singer-songwriter Hawksley Workman has been writing songs dedicated to those helping many people get through the pandemic — their pets!

Download Dr. Bonnie Henry on COVID-19’s second wave; Path to a vaccine; Calling incel violence terrorism; Hawksley Workman wants to write a song about your pet
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B.C.'s top doctor Bonnie Henry says 2nd wave of COVID-19 inevitable, but current lessons will guide response

B.C.'s provincial health officer, Dr. Bonnie Henry, talks to Matt Galloway about the likelihood of a second wave of COVID-19, and how lessons learned so far will help Canadians to be ready.

Download B.C.'s top doctor Bonnie Henry says 2nd wave of COVID-19 inevitable, but current lessons will guide response
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Pandemic pushing restaurants out of business; National affairs panel on border restrictions; How can schools reopen safely?; Dr. Catherine Hankins on AIDS research and COVID-19

Federico’s Supper Club has been an institution in Vancouver for more than 20 years, but is among a number of Canadian restaurants that recently closed their doors forever. We discuss the challenges facing your favourite restaurants in the pandemic, and beyond. Then, our national affairs panel discusses Ottawa's decision to extend the Canada-U.S. border closure amid COVID-19. We hear from Toronto Star columnist Susan Delacourt, The Globe and Mail’s political reporter Justine Hunter, and Emilie Nicolas, a columnist with Le Devoir. Plus, whether schools reopen in the coming weeks — or not until September — what needs to be done to keep students and teachers safe? And finally, in the heart of the AIDS crisis, Dr. Catherine Hankins was at the frontlines of research tackling that epidemic. The Montreal doctor discusses turning her attention to COVID-19.

Download Pandemic pushing restaurants out of business; National affairs panel on border restrictions; How can schools reopen safely?; Dr. Catherine Hankins on AIDS research and COVID-19
[mp3 file: runs 01:11:07]


Reopening Canada-U.S. border; International travel during pandemic; Health writer André Picard; Remembering Capt. Jenn Casey; Dr. David Fajgenbaum on Castleman disease and COVID-19

Keep it open, and risk the spread of infection. Keep it closed, and risk further effects on the economy. When is the right time to reopen the Canada-U.S. border? Former acting U.S. Secretary of Labor Seth Harris and former Minister of Foreign Affairs John Manley join Matt Galloway to discuss. Then, what will international travel look like in the months — or years — before we have a COVID-19 vaccine? Photojournalist Laurel Chor recently travelled to Hong Kong, where arrivals are tested and required to quarantine for 14 days. She tells us about the experience. Plus, health writer André Picard discusses bringing back school, whether summer camps should go ahead and why he says we need to find the pandemic version of safer sex. Then, Colleen Cosgrove remembers her university friend Capt. Jenn Casey, who died in the Snowbirds crash at the weekend. She says Jenn was a bright light with a love of basketball. And finally, Dr. David Fajgenbaum found an effective treatment for his Castleman disease diagnosis, and is now turning to COVID-19. He tells us more.

Download Reopening Canada-U.S. border; International travel during pandemic; Health writer André Picard; Remembering Capt. Jenn Casey; Dr. David Fajgenbaum on Castleman disease and COVID-19
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How can Canada curb a second wave of COVID-19?; Gardening in the pandemic; Canadian sailor Alan Mulholland starts long journey home; Vinyl Cafe: Odd Jobs

What are the prospects of a second wave in Canada? We start today looking to Germany and South Korea, where efforts to reopen are underway, and ask what Canada can learn from those countries. Then, whether you have a backyard, a community plot or a tiny balcony — you can get a little green in your life. We talk to garden lovers across the country about growing from the ground up, and its meditative benefits, during the pandemic. Plus, Canadian sailor Alan Mulholland has been stuck in Martinique for weeks because of lockdown, but is now starting his month-long journey back home. And finally, it’s a holiday Monday in much of the country, so how about easing into the day with a trip to the Vinyl Cafe? We’re bringing you Stuart McLean’s classic story, Odd Jobs.

Download How can Canada curb a second wave of COVID-19?; Gardening in the pandemic; Canadian sailor Alan Mulholland starts long journey home; Vinyl Cafe: Odd Jobs
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May 15, Part 2: Mother-daughter TikTok team; Tapping maple syrup in The Sugarbush; Choirs finding ways to sing together while apart; Obamagate; Man makes hundreds of pies in lockdown for his community

With parents and kids in lockdown, dance challenges on TikTok have become a family affair. Associate professor Shauna Pomerantz is studying creativity on the social media platform, with some help from her daughter/co-researcher, 11-year-old Miriam. They tell us about doing mom-daughter dances in lockdown — for science! Then, on a reserve just outside Thunder Bay, freelance journalist Jolene Banning has been determined to tap maple syrup, a tradition her ancestors began many years ago. She brings us her story, The Sugarbush. Plus, choirs are finding ways to sing together online through the pandemic. But with warnings against in-person practice before a vaccine is found, how long can they keep it up? We'll ask conductor Kathleen Allan of the Amadeus Choir of Greater Toronto. Also, President Trump accused his predecessor Barack Obama of unnamed crimes earlier this week. We ask the Washington Post’s national political reporter Matt Viser what’s behind the accusation, and what effect Obama could have on the 2020 election. And we talk to Toronto man Bradley Harder, who is passing time in the pandemic by baking more than 200 pies for members of his community.

Download May 15, Part 2: Mother-daughter TikTok team; Tapping maple syrup in The Sugarbush; Choirs finding ways to sing together while apart; Obamagate; Man makes hundreds of pies in lockdown for his community
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Documentary: The Sugar Bush

The pandemic has upended the plans, and even traditions, of so many people in this Country. On a reserve just outside Thunder Bay, freelance journalist Jolene Banning has spent the spring trying to carry on with a practice her ancestors began well over a century ago: tapping the sugar maples.

Download Documentary: The Sugar Bush
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May 15, Part 1: Provinces beginning to re-open; Three of Canada’s brightest on who we’ll be after the pandemic; Stuart McLean’s Vinyl Cafe: No Tax on Truffles

We talk to reporters in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Ontario to hear about plans to re-open the provinces, and how COVID-19 has impacted their communities. Then, we ask three of Canada’s finest how they feel about the way the country has responded to COVID-19, and what we might be like after the pandemic passes. Matt Galloway is joined by Giller Prize-winner Madeleine Thien, Olympian Clara Hughes and entrepreneur and philanthropist Mohamad Fakih. Plus, we pay a visit to the Vinyl Cafe with Stuart McLean’s classic story No Tax on Truffles.

Download May 15, Part 1: Provinces beginning to re-open; Three of Canada’s brightest on who we’ll be after the pandemic; Stuart McLean’s Vinyl Cafe: No Tax on Truffles
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May 14, Part 2: The 10-4 model to getting us back to work; Former Democratic primary candidate Andrew Yang on universal basic income; What can Churchill teach us about crisis leadership?

10 days working from home, four days back in the office — that’s the two-week model being suggested to get the economy back on track. We speak with economics professor Eran Yashiv, from the team who designed the model, and associate professor of biology Erin Bromage about how to protect ourselves when it’s time to step back into our workplaces. Then, former U.S. Democratic primary candidate Andrew Yang made universal basic income the centre of his platform. He joins us to explain why the pandemic is the time to finally make it happen. Plus, author Erik Larson discusses what Winston Churchill's first year as British prime minister during the Blitz can teach us about crisis leadership amid COVID-19.

Download May 14, Part 2: The 10-4 model to getting us back to work; Former Democratic primary candidate Andrew Yang on universal basic income; What can Churchill teach us about crisis leadership?
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May 14, Part 1: First registered nurse in Canada dies from COVID-19; Video games are helping people pass time in lockdown; Redesigning public washrooms for a post-pandemic world

On Monday, Brian Beattie became the first registered nurse in Canada to die from COVID-19. We hear from nurses about their fears and the moral choices they face as they head to work, particularly as the pandemic conversation shifts to reopening. Then, are you one of millions of people with an island on Animal Crossing? We get the lowdown on the lockdown sensation, and discuss whether the big business of video games means it’s time we see them as more than just a distraction. Plus, do public washrooms need a redesign for the post-pandemic world? We discuss whether COVID-19 will lead to just that.

Download May 14, Part 1: First registered nurse in Canada dies from COVID-19; Video games are helping people pass time in lockdown; Redesigning public washrooms for a post-pandemic world
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May 13, Part 2: One family's struggle with schizophrenia; Turning to board games to keep occupied and connected; Chinese-Canadians facing racism

Of the Galvin family’s 12 children, 6 were diagnosed with schizophrenia. Their struggle, and the hunt for a genetic explanation, is the subject of the new book Hidden Valley Road. We talk to author Bob Kolker and Lindsay Rausch, the youngest sibling. Then, with time on our hands during COVID-19, people are turning to board games to keep occupied and connected. Scott Nicholson discusses the role these games play in our culture. Plus, we hear from Chinese-Canadians facing not only the pandemic, but the racism it has revealed.

Download May 13, Part 2: One family's struggle with schizophrenia; Turning to board games to keep occupied and connected; Chinese-Canadians facing racism
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May 13, Part 1: The financial impact of COVID-19, and the dos and don’ts of reopening the economy

We hear from Canadians caught up in the economic free fall caused by COVID-19, including a Halifax shop owner in crisis, and an out-of-work personal trainer supporting six kids. Then, Professor of Strategic Management Anita McGahan on the dos and don’ts of reopening the economy, and our national affairs panellists — economics columnist Heather Scoffield, national reporter Mia Rabson, and energy and business reporter Emma Graney — discuss joblessness, 'bailouts', and deficits arising from COVID-19. Plus, the CBC’s Anthony Germain discusses the impact of the pandemic on Newfoundland and Labrador, and the risks of falling back into 'have not' times.

Download May 13, Part 1: The financial impact of COVID-19, and the dos and don’ts of reopening the economy
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Introducing Someone Knows Something: Donald Izzett Jr.

In Someone Knows Something Season 6, Debra has been searching for her son, Donald Izzett Jr. for 25 years. The last time she spoke with him was Mother’s Day. He had called from a road trip, but sounded upset, saying he needed money. Then the phone went dead. Donnie’s friend told police that he dropped him off in New Orleans. But Debra thinks he was murdered. And decides to investigate the case herself. Here's an excerpt from the first episode. Full episodes are available at hyperurl.co/skscbc

Download Introducing Someone Knows Something: Donald Izzett Jr.
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May 12, Part 2: High schooler published in prestigious journal; Should we wear masks to curb COVID-19?; Pandemic conspiracy theories; David Ridgen on new season of Someone Knows Something; Health writer Andre Picard

Was your high school science fair project published in the New England Journal of Medicine? Thomas Khairy's was. The 15-year-old tells us what it’s like to become the youngest principal author ever published in the journal. Then, are masks helping us to protect each other from COVID-19? What kind should we wear and when, if at all? Infectious disease specialist Allison McGeer clears up some of the confusion. Plus, we discuss why pandemic conspiracy theories are so contagious, and how to fight them. Then, David Ridgen brings us details of the new season of CBC Podcasts’ Someone Knows Something. The new episodes pursue the cold case of Donny Izzett, who disappeared on Mother's Day 25 years ago. And health writer Andre Picard weighs in on whether kids in Quebec should be back in school, and if families should be let back into care homes to help care for their loved ones.

Download May 12, Part 2: High schooler published in prestigious journal; Should we wear masks to curb COVID-19?; Pandemic conspiracy theories; David Ridgen on new season of Someone Knows Something; Health writer Andre Picard
[mp3 file: runs 01:42:16]


May 12, Part 1: What awaits university students this fall?; The future of work; Protest movements trying to keep momentum during the pandemic

Some Canadian universities announced that courses will be primarily taught online in the fall — but tuition won’t change. How is that sitting with students? Then, what does COVID-19 mean for the future of work? Organizational psychologist Adam Grant discusses what we can learn from the pandemic. And how do you protest during a pandemic when physical distancing measures are in place? We speak to organizers trying to keep the momentum in their movements, from Hong Kong protests to climate change marches here in Canada.

Download May 12, Part 1: What awaits university students this fall?; The future of work; Protest movements trying to keep momentum during the pandemic
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May 11, Part 2: Sexual assault allegation against Joe Biden; Spike in adoption of ‘pandemic puppies’; COVID-19 leaves international students in limbo; Looking for a cure in unusual places — like llama blood

In an election year like no other, and in the wake of #MeToo, we discuss how Democrats are reacting to the sexual assault allegation against Joe Biden from former staffer Tara Reade. Then, have you welcomed a ‘pandemic puppy’ into your home? We talk about a spike in animal adoptions, and hear how dogs are helping a lot of people cope with these stressful times. Plus, international student Kenza Bennouna sends a message of solidarity to fellow students in limbo during #COVID19 And what do llama blood and deep ocean microbes have in common? Scientists are looking at both for potential COVID-19 solutions. We hear about finding hope in unusual places.

Download May 11, Part 2: Sexual assault allegation against Joe Biden; Spike in adoption of ‘pandemic puppies’; COVID-19 leaves international students in limbo; Looking for a cure in unusual places — like llama blood
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May 11, Part 1: Pressures of homeschooling; Jane Philpott on protecting the vulnerable; The race to secure PPE

Have you been homeschooling your children during the pandemic? We talk to parents and teachers about how their kids are coping, and what they’ve learned themselves. Then, former federal health minister Jane Philpott is on the COVID-19 frontlines working at a home for disabled adults. She tells Matt Galloway it’s time to rethink how we treat the vulnerable. Plus, Chris Kutarna was helping countries secure PPE right as the pandemic exploded, he tells us about problems he saw with our global trade system.

Download May 11, Part 1: Pressures of homeschooling; Jane Philpott on protecting the vulnerable; The race to secure PPE
[mp3 file: runs 01:14:04]


May 8, Part 2: Stuart McLean’s Vinyl Cafe: The Hairdresser; Origins of COVID-19; New Yorker cartoonist Barry Blitt; Adele and the conversation around weight loss

We pay a visit to Stuart McLean’s Vinyl Cafe this morning, with a story about someone we’d all probably love to see at this point in the pandemic, The Hairdresser. Then, where did COVID-19 start? We talk to epidemiologists about the search for a so-called patient zero, and their concerns about the term and its consequences. Plus, Montreal-born Barry Blitt has just won a Pulitzer Prize for his cartoons for the New Yorker. He tells us about capturing the absurdity of politics in his drawings. And on her birthday earlier this week, singer Adele posted a picture thanking health-care workers — but the reaction focused on her body. We discuss the conversation around weight loss, and whether it should be happening at all.

Download May 8, Part 2: Stuart McLean’s Vinyl Cafe: The Hairdresser; Origins of COVID-19; New Yorker cartoonist Barry Blitt; Adele and the conversation around weight loss
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May 8, Part 1: Mortuary work during the pandemic; Killing of Ahmaud Arbery; Bill Buford on the secrets of French cooking

A sometimes neglected front line in the fight against COVID-19 are the people who care for those who die. We talk to mortuary and funeral home workers trying to cope with an extraordinary death toll. Then, Ahmaud Arbery was an unarmed black man out for a jog in February, when he was chased down, shot and killed by two men. On what would have been Arbery's 26th birthday, we discuss why it took months — and intense public pressure — to bring charges. Plus, Bill Buford tells us about his years as a chef-in-training in France, and uncovering the secret of French cooking.

Download May 8, Part 1: Mortuary work during the pandemic; Killing of Ahmaud Arbery; Bill Buford on the secrets of French cooking
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May 7, Part 2: How we perceive time in lockdown; Cruise ship crews stranded at sea; Elon Musk and Grimes’ new baby X Æ A-12; Long-term care facilities and COVID-19

Are you losing time in lockdown? Finding it hard to stop the days blurring into one another? We discuss our perception of time, and how to anchor ourselves in this unsettled period. Then, countries have closed their ports to cruise ships, leaving thousands of vessels — and their workers — out to sea. We speak with Canadian singer Michelle Joly, stranded and unsure how she can get home. Plus, are you talking to your neighbours more as the lockdown continues? Montreal artist and filmmaker Marites Carino has taken it a step further: she’s on her balcony with a microphone taped to a broom, interviewing her neighbours. She tells us more. Also, Tesla CEO Elon Musk and his partner, the Canadian singer Grimes, have named their new baby X Æ A-12. We talk to a naming expert about the choice, and the trend among parents to choose more unusual names. And finally, we talk to a panel of medical experts about the number of COVID-19-related deaths in Canada's nursing homes and how outbreaks like this can be avoided.

Download May 7, Part 2: How we perceive time in lockdown; Cruise ship crews stranded at sea; Elon Musk and Grimes’ new baby X Æ A-12; Long-term care facilities and COVID-19
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May 7, Part 1: U.S. communities hit hardest by COVID-19; The future of public space; Documentary - An Urgent Matter: In prison during the pandemic

Ready or not, the U.S. is revving up to reopen. We hear from places and communities hardest hit by COVID-19, from the Navajo Nation, to Wisconsin’s meatpacking industry, to the African American community. Then, as part of our series The Fix, we look at the future of public space. What are the weaknesses exposed by the pandemic, and where can we use our creativity to build even greater cities when all this is over. Plus, from CBC Radio’s The Doc Project, we hear the story of a young man jailed in Ontario while awaiting trial. He’s now trying to get out of prison before COVID-19 gets in.

Download May 7, Part 1: U.S. communities hit hardest by COVID-19; The future of public space; Documentary - An Urgent Matter: In prison during the pandemic
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May 6, Part 2: Why there might be more to your pandemic boredom; Biking boom in Canada; Healing power of music; The shadow of COVID-19 on Ramadan

How are you feeling as the lockdown drags on? A little bored? A lot bored? Very bored?! We talk to neuroscientist James Danckert about why we’re feeling this way, while clinical psychologist Dr. John Eastwood says it might even serve an important purpose. Then, with quieter roads and fewer cars, there’s a biking boom happening across Canada. We look at whether it will last, and what could be done to make it safer on our streets. Plus, when Montreal-based artist Maryze wrote a song for her hospitalized grandmother, she never expected the chaplain to play it for the entire facility. They join us to discuss the healing power of music. And we hear about the shadow the pandemic has cast on Ramadan, and how Muslims are coping in unusual times.

Download May 6, Part 2: Why there might be more to your pandemic boredom; Biking boom in Canada; Healing power of music; The shadow of COVID-19 on Ramadan
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May 6, Part 1: COVID-19 causing chaos for the travel industry; Korean baseball hits the airwaves; Georges Laraque on surviving the virus; National affairs panel on agricultural relief

The pandemic has created pandemonium for the travel industry, cancelling everything from short getaways to trips of a lifetime. We discuss whether things will ever be the same again. Then, sports-starved North American audiences are about to be treated to Korean baseball. What can fans expect? Plus, former NHL tough guy Georges Laraque shares his fight with COVID-19, and says we all need to take it seriously. And our national affairs panellists Murray Mandryk and Kady O'Malley discuss the federal government’s new agricultural relief, and whether Conservatives are struggling to connect with voters during the pandemic.

Download May 6, Part 1: COVID-19 causing chaos for the travel industry; Korean baseball hits the airwaves; Georges Laraque on surviving the virus; National affairs panel on agricultural relief
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May 5, Part 2: Arrival of the ‘murder hornets’; Dogs sniffing out COVID-19; Outbreaks in Congo; B.C. tree planters and fear of pandemic spread

You know what this year didn't need? Giant wasps known as murder hornets. We talk to an entomologist about their arrival in Canada, the risk they pose — and the time he was stung by one. Plus, dogs have been used to detect diseases like malaria. Can they be trained to sniff out COVID-19 in humans? Then, World Vision’s Ann-Marie Connor brings us an update from the front lines of Ebola and COVID-19 outbreaks in Congo. And finally, how can B.C. tree planters work safely during the pandemic? We hear concerns about bringing the virus to remote communities, and ask B.C.’s forests minister Doug Donaldson about measures to protect workers and the people they interact with.

Download May 5, Part 2: Arrival of the ‘murder hornets’; Dogs sniffing out COVID-19; Outbreaks in Congo; B.C. tree planters and fear of pandemic spread
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May 5, Part 1: Criticism of China’s early handling of COVID-19; Using human sewage to trace the virus; Montreal Mayor Valérie Plante on urban recovery; André Picard on getting outside

We discuss growing criticism of China’s handling of the early days of COVID-19, and the calls for greater transparency about the origins of the virus. Then, scientists are turning to human sewage to get a sense of how the virus spreads, and where it might be. We hear about how what we call waste is actually full of valuable data. Plus, Mayor of Montreal Valérie Plante is the only Canadian appointed to an international task force to help cities recover from the pandemic. She discusses what cities need, and what needs to change. And health reporter André Picard argues that it’s time for public health advice to change, and tell Canadians to get outside as long as they don’t congregate.

Download May 5, Part 1: Criticism of China’s early handling of COVID-19; Using human sewage to trace the virus; Montreal Mayor Valérie Plante on urban recovery; André Picard on getting outside
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May 4, Part 2: Making sure science around COVID-19 is sound; International remittances drying up during pandemic; Musicians offering virtual concerts for hospital patients; Supporting Chinese-Canadian communities

The science around COVID-19 is being published and reported on at a dizzying speed, prompting concerns that ideas that are not being properly peer reviewed could later prove to be unsound — and damage public faith. We discuss finding the balance between good science and the urgency to quash the pandemic. Then, less money in your pocket might mean less money to send to relatives and dependents elsewhere. What happens when international remittances dry up because of COVID-19? Plus, Vancouver musician Matthew Li is playing private, virtual concerts for hospital patients across the country. He shares why, and how patients are reacting. And we talk to Dr. Kenneth Fung, one of the researchers behind PROTECH, a new initiative aimed at helping Chinese-Canadian communities deal with the social and mental health challenges of COVID-19.

Download May 4, Part 2: Making sure science around COVID-19 is sound; International remittances drying up during pandemic; Musicians offering virtual concerts for hospital patients; Supporting Chinese-Canadian communities
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May 4, Part 1: Italians ease lockdown; Loneliness in the pandemic; Canada’s economic outlook; Minister Bill Blair on ban of 'assault-style' firearms

After weeks and weeks of a strict lockdown, Italians are poised to enjoy new “freedoms,” like exercising outside and sitting in a park. We talk to people poised to step outside for the first time in weeks. Then, if lockdown has brought on feelings of loneliness, you’re not alone. We hear from Marci Stepak — who has battled loneliness for years — and get tips on how to cope from clinical psychologist Susan Pinker. Plus, how secure is Canada’s economic future, and what will it look like post-pandemic? We look at what is happening with your money, from the price of oil to what the eventual rebound could look like. And Minister of Public Safety Minister Bill Blair discusses the Liberals’ ban on certain models of 'assault-style' firearms, and the fierce response from gun control advocates and gun owners.

Download May 4, Part 1: Italians ease lockdown; Loneliness in the pandemic; Canada’s economic outlook; Minister Bill Blair on ban of 'assault-style' firearms
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May 1, Part 1: Ban on assault weapons; Surgeries delayed due to COVID-19; How well is the media covering pandemic?; 30 years of Hubble

After the mass shooting in Nova Scotia, the federal government is moving to ban a host of assault weapons. We discuss the expectations and concerns on all sides of this debate. Then, COVID-19 has delayed many crucial surgeries and treatments for cancer, heart and other patients. We talk to a patient who's waiting, and a surgeon who's working on how to deal with the backlog. And we may all be glued to the news, but how well is the media covering the pandemic? We discuss what the public needs in a time of crisis, and how the pandemic is exacerbating the challenges media outlets were already facing. Plus, it’s been 30 years since the Hubble telescope began to chart deep space, but the story started with blurry pictures and a daring fix in space. We hear how Hubble became our eyes on the wonders of the universe.

Download May 1, Part 1: Ban on assault weapons; Surgeries delayed due to COVID-19; How well is the media covering pandemic?; 30 years of Hubble
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May 1, Part 2: Vinyl Cafe story: Fish Head; Famine and locusts in Africa; Advice columnist Amy Dickinson; Couple separated by U.S.-Canada border make it a venue for dates

We hear the classic Vinyl Cafe story Fish Head for more Dave and Morley antics from the late Stuart McLean. Then, the UN World Food Programme says the pandemic is pushing parts of Africa towards famines of “biblical proportions,” and a plague of locusts is only making things worse. We discuss the threat facing millions. Plus, the pandemic has turned lives upside down — what does that mean if you’re in the business of solving personal problems? Advice columnist Amy Dickinson tells us what people are asking her during COVID-19. And finally, we talk to Savannah Koop and Ryan Hamilton, a young couple living on opposite sides of the B.C.-Washington border. They were due to get married next week, but instead the pandemic has left them with their big day postponed, and sitting on opposite sides of the border for “dates” — six feet apart.

Download May 1, Part 2: Vinyl Cafe story: Fish Head; Famine and locusts in Africa; Advice columnist Amy Dickinson; Couple separated by U.S.-Canada border make it a venue for dates
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April 30, Part 1: What we’ve learned about COVID-19; Mental health of front-line workers; How can Canadian theatre survive lockdown?; Toronto Blue Jays broadcaster Jamie Campbell calls up fans

What have we learned about COVID-19 since the pandemic started? We ask doctors what we now know from these initial months, and what questions remain unanswered. Then, we discuss the toll that the coronavirus pandemic is taking on the mental health of front-line workers, and the extra support they’ll need when this is all over. Plus, what could an extended lockdown mean for Canadian theatre? We hear about worried conversations behind the scenes and how theatre-makers are getting creative to survive. And Toronto Blue Jays broadcaster Jamie Campbell is helping out people during the pandemic by picking up the phone — and calling baseball fans who are missing the sport, and each other.

Download April 30, Part 1: What we’ve learned about COVID-19; Mental health of front-line workers; How can Canadian theatre survive lockdown?; Toronto Blue Jays broadcaster Jamie Campbell calls up fans
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April 30, Part 2: Believers say Pentagon’s UFO video shows proof of spacecraft; Learning from the 1918 pandemic; Misleading stories about COVID-19 origins

The Pentagon has released videos that some UFO enthusiasts say show proof of spacecraft. But what do these videos actually show? A skeptic and a former UFO investigator discuss. Then, what can we learn from the painful lessons in the 1918 pandemic, and do we face greater hardship if we don’t heed them? Plus, CBC reporter Andrea Bellemare brings us the story of a free publication some say is stoking racism and xenophobia with misleading stories about the origin of COVID-19.

Download April 30, Part 2: Believers say Pentagon’s UFO video shows proof of spacecraft; Learning from the 1918 pandemic; Misleading stories about COVID-19 origins
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April 29, Part 2: Saskatchewan eases restrictions; New Brunswickers choose social bubbles; Fort McMurray floods

We speak to Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe about plans to ease COVID-19 restrictions in his province, where some businesses will reopen next week. Then, New Brunswickers are being given the option to pick one household to “bubble” with, as a step towards easing physical distancing restrictions. Who — and how — would you choose? Plus, through fires, pandemics, and now flooding, a long-time Fort McMurray resident explains why there's no place like home, and why he has no plans to leave.

Download April 29, Part 2: Saskatchewan eases restrictions; New Brunswickers choose social bubbles; Fort McMurray floods
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April 29, Part 1: Quebec reopening schools; National affairs panel; Rick Wilson and Molly Jong-Fast; Morgan Campbell on Netflix hit The Last Dance

Quebec is reopening elementary schools in mid-May. Is it too soon? We ask Quebec’s Education Minister Jean-François Roberge about the thinking behind the timing, and hear from a concerned parent who won’t be sending her child back just yet, and an infectious diseases specialist who thinks reopening is the right choice. Then, our national affairs panel — journalist Marie Vastel, columnist Niigaan Sinclair and pollster Shachi Kurl — discuss the politics of reopening after COVID-19. Plus, Rick Wilson was once the master of Republican strategy for defeating Democrats; Molly Jong-Fast is a writer who comes from a long line of prominent liberals. The unlikely duo explain why they’re joining forces in a new podcast, The New Abnormal. And writer Morgan Campbell discusses the Netflix hit The Last Dance, which allows sports-starved fans to relive Michael Jordan’s closing chapter with the Chicago Bulls.

Download April 29, Part 1: Quebec reopening schools; National affairs panel; Rick Wilson and Molly Jong-Fast; Morgan Campbell on Netflix hit The Last Dance
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April 28, Part 2: Grooming your dog at home; Comedians find humour in pandemic’s absurdity; Lawrence Wright on when truth is stranger than fiction

Have you tried to shear your dog in isolation? Or is your pooch now more hair than hound, a tumbleweed on a leash? A vet gives us grooming tips. Then, what's a stir-crazy comedian to do during COVID-19? Aurora Browne from the Baroness von Sketch Show and Canadian comedian Leonard Chan talk about finding the humour in an absurd situation. And Lawrence Wright’s new novel is about a killer virus sweeping the globe — sound familiar? He joins us to discuss how truth can be stranger than fiction, and how the U.S. government’s response to COVID-19 compares to his worst imaginings.

Download April 28, Part 2: Grooming your dog at home; Comedians find humour in pandemic’s absurdity; Lawrence Wright on when truth is stranger than fiction
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April 28, Part 1: Domestic violence during the pandemic; Physical distancing in grocery stores, and new ways of doing business; André Picard on getting back to normal; Mental health and COVID-19

What happens when home isn’t a safe place to shelter in place? We discuss the gaps in protection for people facing domestic violence during COVID-19, and ask Minister for Women and Gender Equality Maryam Monsef what the government will do to help. Then, will grocery stores be forever changed by the pandemic? We discuss the measures stores are taking to meet safety requirements, and the business changes that may outlast COVID-19 — such as online ordering and home deliveries. Plus, as provinces begin to look at easing physical distancing restrictions, health writer André Picard assesses the long walk back to the way things used to be. And as the pandemic amplifies the mental health problems that many people live with, therapist and Other People’s Problems podcast host Hillary McBride gives us a glimpse into the coping mechanisms used by her clients and fellow therapists.

Download April 28, Part 1: Domestic violence during the pandemic; Physical distancing in grocery stores, and new ways of doing business; André Picard on getting back to normal; Mental health and COVID-19
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April 27, Part 2: Kim Jong-un’s health; John Mighton on teaching your kids math; Antibody testing for COVID-19; Piloting the Mars Rover from your living room; Calgary Stampede cancelled

How much do we know about the health of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, and the line of succession if his condition takes a turn for the worse? Sung-Yoon Lee, professor of Korean Studies at Tufts University, weighs in. Then, John Mighton, founder of JUMP Math, has some tips for teaching kids math at home — both for parents and kids themselves. Then, researchers are exploring antibody testing for COVID-19, in the hopes it could reveal who has developed immunity, and might allow an easing of restrictions. We talk to Dr. Aenor Sawyer, who’s helping to test the entire town of Bolinas, Calif. Plus, if you thought doing your office job from home was tricky, imagine piloting a robot about 93 million miles away — from your living room. We hear about NASA engineers doing just that with the Mars Curiosity rover. And finally, it's hard to sum up just how big a deal the Calgary Stampede is, and how much its cancellation this summer will hurt. George Brookman explains what it will mean for a city and province already facing tough economic times.

Download April 27, Part 2: Kim Jong-un’s health; John Mighton on teaching your kids math; Antibody testing for COVID-19; Piloting the Mars Rover from your living room; Calgary Stampede cancelled
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April 27, Part 1: N.S. violence and misogyny; Montreal’s outbreak; Young birders; COVID-19 and vaccine hesitancy

We now know the shootings in Nova Scotia started with domestic violence. We hear from experts and advocates who say the violence fits into a wider pattern of misogyny. Then, even as the COVID-19 curve starts to flatten in Canada, we ask why Montreal's outbreak has been particularly bad? Plus, we hear from a family who are using the time together during lockdown to get to know the birds in their local neighbourhood. And an immunization expert discusses how an eventual vaccine for COVID-19 could sway those normally opposed to inoculations.

Download April 27, Part 1: N.S. violence and misogyny; Montreal’s outbreak; Young birders; COVID-19 and vaccine hesitancy
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April 24: Stories of joy and hope, Part 1: N.S. kitchen party; Getting to know birds; Without an audience, pandas are getting busy; Exploring our own minds; The curious tale of a song called Cyrano

Today on The Current: We’re dedicating Friday’s show to good news — stories about hope, and finding joy in these difficult times. We have our own little kitchen party, with music and stories from Nova Scotian singers David Myles and Reeny Smith. Then, as spring eases in, have you noticed more birds at your window or in your garden? Do you want to know more about them? Author David Sibley has tips for armchair birdwatching. And, pandas in a Hong Kong zoo are mating for the first time in more than a decade — and scientists believe it could be because we're no longer in their bedroom. Expert Jim Harkness discusses the joy of pandas getting it on. Plus, we may be staying home and getting restless, but philosopher Alain de Botton says it’s the perfect time to explore one very mysterious place: our own minds. Finally, we hear the tale of a mysterious French songwriter, a nameless agent, and an English professor who just wanted to bring a bit of joy to his students — the story of the creation of the song Cyrano.

Download April 24: Stories of joy and hope, Part 1: N.S. kitchen party; Getting to know birds; Without an audience, pandas are getting busy; Exploring our own minds; The curious tale of a song called Cyrano
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April 24: Stories of joy and hope, Part 2: Can love flourish in a pandemic?; The joy of gardening; Pandemic University for writers; Stargazing

It seemed insane at the time: nine days in isolation on a cargo ship with a woman he barely knew. But for Dev Aujla and Liz Tran, love flourished. We hear how. Plus, author Ed Lawrence tells us about the happiness gardening can bring; and q host Tom Power finds out how Elmo and the gang on Sesame Street are helping kids find new ways to play together, even with the rules around physical distance. Then, what's a writer to do during a pandemic? If you're Omar Mouallem, you launch a pop-up writing school with all your ridiculously talented friends. He tells us all about Pandemic University. Bonus: The Current is asking you to finish a short (very short) story and you can hear the beginning on CBC Listen. And if city lights are blocking out the night sky where you are, astrophysicist Nathalie Ouellette has some tips on how you can still go stargazing.

Download April 24: Stories of joy and hope, Part 2: Can love flourish in a pandemic?; The joy of gardening; Pandemic University for writers; Stargazing
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April 23, Part 2: COVID-19 in Brazil, Russia and Sweden; Documenting isolation for history; Accusations against Peter Nygard

We check in with reporters in Brazil, Russia and Sweden, where infections are beginning to peak — and government responses are being criticized. Then, isolation may feel tedious, but your days on the sofa could be important to history (yes, really!). We talk to academics and curators who want you to document your lockdown life in words and pictures. Plus, 17 Canadian women have joined a lawsuit against clothing mogul Peter Nygard, accusing him of rape and sexual assault. CBC Fifth Estate’s Timothy Sawa discusses the case, which involves 46 women in total.

Download April 23, Part 2: COVID-19 in Brazil, Russia and Sweden; Documenting isolation for history; Accusations against Peter Nygard
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April 23, Part 1: Virtual vigils for Nova Scotia victims; COVID-19 at Alberta meat processing plant; Facing the pandemic with a disability

In the wake of last weekend’s shootings, Nova Scotians are overcoming physical distancing measures and finding new ways to mourn. We speak with the organizer of a virtual vigil, and an expert in community resilience. Then, there are hundreds of COVID-19 cases at a Cargill Foods plant in High River, Alta., one of the busiest meat processing plants in Canada. We speak with a worker who says protective measures weren’t sufficient, and ask Calgary's Medical Officer of Health about balancing worker safety and ensuring Canada's food supply. Plus, we look at how the pandemic is magnifying the daily challenges already faced by people with disabilities

Download April 23, Part 1: Virtual vigils for Nova Scotia victims; COVID-19 at Alberta meat processing plant; Facing the pandemic with a disability
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April 22, Part 2: Jason Rosenthal on grief; Earth Day and the pandemic; Overindulgence in quarantine

As Amy Krouse Rosenthal was dying in 2017, she wrote an article called You May Want to Marry My Husband. The man she wrote about, Jason Rosenthal, joins us to discuss his new book, My Wife Said You May Want to Marry Me: A Memoir, and what he’s learned about grief. Then, today is the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, but after half a century, we talk to Mark Jaccard about whether the pandemic lockdown could give us the space to turn a day of reflection into action. And while we wait out physical distancing, are we overdoing it with alcohol and other substances? We hear from two experts about our culture of indulgence.

Download April 22, Part 2: Jason Rosenthal on grief; Earth Day and the pandemic; Overindulgence in quarantine
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April 22, Part 1: RCMP response during N.S. shootings; National affairs panel; COVID-19 silent spreaders; How the virus has infected our language

Hard questions are being asked about whether the RCMP did enough to warn the public as a gunman moved through Nova Scotia over 12 hours. Policing expert Christian Leuprecht discusses the response, and the decision to warn people via Twitter rather than an emergency alert. Plus, our national affairs panellists discuss the Nova Scotia tragedy, and what questions it raises for the local community, and Canada’s leaders. Then, we discuss the so-called silent spreaders of COVID-19 — those without symptoms who unwittingly infect others — and the problem that poses for curbing the virus. And do you know what a ‘covidiot’ is? A ‘quarantini’? Linguist Tony Thorne discusses how COVID-19 has infected our language.

Download April 22, Part 1: RCMP response during N.S. shootings; National affairs panel; COVID-19 silent spreaders; How the virus has infected our language
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April 21, Part 2: Economist Thomas Piketty; People falling through COVID-19 financial aid cracks; Secrets of sourdough; Nature writer Richard Louv

If French economist Thomas Piketty has his way, we'll come out of COVID-19 with ways to close the gap between the haves and have-nots. He tells us more. Then, who's not being helped by the financial aid offered by the federal government? We hear from Canadians falling through the cracks. Plus, how the boom in bread making is giving researchers an opportunity to unravel some of the mysteries behind sourdough. And finally, nature writer Richard Louv on what this moment means for the wildlife in our midst, and our appreciation of the natural world.

Download April 21, Part 2: Economist Thomas Piketty; People falling through COVID-19 financial aid cracks; Secrets of sourdough; Nature writer Richard Louv
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April 21, Part 1: Remembering victims of Nova Scotia shootings; André Picard on mourning; Inside an ICU through the eyes of those working there

We talk with the friends and family of those killed in the N.S. shootings, and hear stories of a beloved teacher, a retired firefighter, and a family who were passing quarantine by posting videos of kitchen parties. Then, Nova Scotia Premier Stephen McNeil joins us to discuss what’s being done to support grieving families, and health writer André Picard discusses the challenge of mourning in an era of physical distancing. Plus, we get a unique look inside the ICU at Markham Stouffville Hospital after the CBC gave cameras to medical staff who filmed hours of their work. Wendy Mesley brings us inside, and respiratory therapy Kelly Travers tells us what it’s like on the front line.

Download April 21, Part 1: Remembering victims of Nova Scotia shootings; André Picard on mourning; Inside an ICU through the eyes of those working there
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April 20, Part 2: Orphan oil wells; Countries easing COVID-19 restrictions; Author Jenny Offill

We talk to an Alberta farmer who says while he's glad orphan oil wells will be cleaned up, the duty should fall on companies, not taxpayers. Then, we check in with people in Spain, Austria and South Korea, where COVID-19 restrictions are starting to ease. Plus, author of Weather, Jenny Offill, tells Matt Galloway what the pandemic might teach us about climate change, and taking care of each other.

Download April 20, Part 2: Orphan oil wells; Countries easing COVID-19 restrictions; Author Jenny Offill
[mp3 file: runs 01:21:25]


April 20, Part 1: Nova Scotia shootings; Surviving COVID-19; Listener questions about the virus; Moving back in with Mom

The weekend’s shooting rampage in Nova Scotia is one of the deadliest attacks of its kind in Canadian history. We ask how it unfolded, and talk to Colchester County Mayor Christine Blair about the shockwaves rippling through her community. Then, we talk to Richard Reid who contracted COVID-19 and had to be intubated in the ICU. He and his wife, Lori De Luca Reid, tell us their story of surviving the virus. Plus, we asked for your lingering questions about COVID-19. One of the country's leading voices on infectious disease outbreaks, Dr. Allison McGeer, is here to answer them. And as COVID-19 lockdowns took hold, Dale Edwards faced not being able to see her mother in an elder care home — so she moved in. She tells us what it’s been to live with her mom in the Vancouver seniors’ home during the crisis.

Download April 20, Part 1: Nova Scotia shootings; Surviving COVID-19; Listener questions about the virus; Moving back in with Mom
[mp3 file: runs 01:09:20]


April 17, Part 2: Parks and public spaces during COVID-19; China’s wet markets; Missing loved ones in long-term care homes; B.C. Premier John Horgan

As the weather starts to get better, the question of keeping parks and open spaces open weighs heavily on efforts to flatten the curve. We hear the pros and cons, and why Canadians may need clearer guidelines. Then, China has been reopening its wet markets around the country, despite calls to ban the markets outright. We hear why it may not be that simple. Plus, a woman whose parents are in a long-term care home shares her experience of the pain felt by so many people who are restricted from visiting their loved ones. And finally, B.C. Premier John Horgan has said the province has cause for “genuine celebration” for the work already done to fight COVID-19. He joins us to discuss the work still to do.

Download April 17, Part 2: Parks and public spaces during COVID-19; China’s wet markets; Missing loved ones in long-term care homes; B.C. Premier John Horgan
[mp3 file: runs 01:43:32]


April 17, Part 1: U.S. protests against lockdown; Chinese Canadian response to COVID-19; Advertising during an outbreak; Pandemic disinformation

This week has seen mounting protests in the U.S., with people gathering to oppose quarantine measures that they say impinge on their personal rights. We discuss the issue with one of those protesters, Mike Detmer, and Conservative commentator Charlie Sykes. Then, even while the risks of COVID-19 still seemed low, some Chinese Canadians were beginning to practise physical distancing. We discuss whether that early action helped slow the spread. Plus, we hear how advertisers and brands are walking the line between pushing their products, and reflecting the harsh realities we find ourselves in. And we talk to a British MP who wants to see tougher laws against those spreading COVID-19 disinformation.

Download April 17, Part 1: U.S. protests against lockdown; Chinese Canadian response to COVID-19; Advertising during an outbreak; Pandemic disinformation
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April 16, Part 2: Documentary: One Roof; Malcolm Gladwell; Choir! Choir! Choir!; U.S. election update

Montreal-born journalist Julia Scott has spent weeks in lockdown in San Francisco, in a building with more than 100 residents. She’s used the time to get to know her neighbours — finding community in people who were recently strangers. She brings us her documentary, One Roof. Then, author and journalist Malcolm Gladwell discusses how we might start to move past the pandemic and why he’s optimistic about what comes next. Plus, Daveed Goldman and Nobu Adilman of Choir! Choir! Choir! discuss the power of song to connect us, and lifting people’s spirits with their 'choir-antine' sing-alongs. And with the U.S. presidential election six months away, have Donald Trump’s daily pandemic briefings become a platform for his re-election?

Download April 16, Part 2: Documentary: One Roof; Malcolm Gladwell; Choir! Choir! Choir!; U.S. election update
[mp3 file: runs 01:24:14]


COVID-19 and our elders: Residents, family and staff of Canada's long-term care homes share their fears

People in long-term care homes are cut off from their relatives during the pandemic, who are left worried their loved ones are in the path of COVID-19. One advocate argues these family members should be viewed as essential workers — and let back in to help with care. Then, hear from staff and management of long-term care facilities to hear their concerns — and distress — about the rising COVID-19 death toll in the facilities.

Download COVID-19 and our elders: Residents, family and staff of Canada's long-term care homes share their fears
[mp3 file: runs 00:39:18]


How a building full of strangers is becoming a community of close neighbours during the pandemic

Montreal-born journalist Julia Scott has spent weeks in lockdown in San Francisco, in a building with more than 100 residents. She’s used the time to get to know her neighbours — finding community in people who were recently strangers. She brings us her documentary, One Roof.

Download How a building full of strangers is becoming a community of close neighbours during the pandemic
[mp3 file: runs 00:15:40]


April 16, Part 1: COVID-19 and staff concerns at elder care facilities; Threats to WHO funding; Gender equality in the pandemic

We talk to staff and management of long-term care facilities; hearing their concerns and distress about the rising COVID-19 death toll in the facilities. Then, warnings of deadly consequences followed U.S. President Donald Trump’s decision to cut funding to the World Health Organization — but some argue the organization has serious problems. We hear both sides. Plus, is the pandemic magnifying gender inequality? We discuss how family and work dynamics are playing out during COVID-19.

Download April 16, Part 1: COVID-19 and staff concerns at elder care facilities; Threats to WHO funding; Gender equality in the pandemic
[mp3 file: runs 01:08:28]


April 15, Part 2: Isolation tips for introverts; Helping the homeless; Marathon training in tight spaces; Grief during the pandemic

Technology is keeping us in touch during physical distancing, but the natural ease of chatting face-to-face may feel more awkward on a screen. We discuss why, as well as how self-declared introverts are coping with the onslaught of round-the-clock video calling (and not many excuses to say no). Then, how are homeless people and the organizations that help them faring in the pandemic? We hear about a rise in people asking for help, and opportunities to address the deeper problems. Plus, we talk to a funeral home director about efforts to support those bereaved in the COVID-19 pandemic when physical distancing measures add layers of delay and disruption to the grieving process. And finally, we talk to a woman training for a marathon in her hotel room; and a group of cosplayers using their creative talents to raise money for those affected by the pandemic.

Download April 15, Part 2: Isolation tips for introverts; Helping the homeless; Marathon training in tight spaces; Grief during the pandemic
[mp3 file: runs 01:25:08]


April 15, Part 1: Are families of elders in care homes ‘essential workers’?; Balancing pandemic restrictions and civil liberties; National affairs panel

People in long-term care homes are cut off from their relatives in the pandemic, who are left worried their loved ones are in the path of COVID-19. One advocate argues these family members should be viewed as essential workers, and let back in to help with care. Then, as some Canadians face tickets and high fines, we discuss the balance between the physical distancing measures needed to curb the pandemic, and the test of civil liberties. Plus, our national affairs panellists Althia Raj, Robert Benzie and Vaughn Palmer discuss the latest COVID-19 numbers and the political response.

Download April 15, Part 1: Are families of elders in care homes ‘essential workers’?; Balancing pandemic restrictions and civil liberties; National affairs panel
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April 14, Part 2: Margaret Atwood; Lessons from Spanish flu; Caring for our elders; Weathering the economic storm

Keith McArthur — host of CBC podcast Unlocking Bryson's Brain — discusses his quest to cure his son's rare genetic disorder. Then, author Margaret Atwood talks to Tom Power about the current world crisis, how she's occupying her time, and the importance of the arts right now. Plus, former CBC health reporter Pauline Dakin discusses how lessons from the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic can be applied today; and the Globe and Mail’s health columnist Andre Picard on how the pandemic has exposed critical problems in how we care for our elders. How is Canada weathering the economic storm created by COVID-19? We check in with economists Frances Donald and Armine Yalnizyan.

Download April 14, Part 2: Margaret Atwood; Lessons from Spanish flu; Caring for our elders; Weathering the economic storm
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Introducing Unlocking Bryson's Brain

Bryson seems like a perfectly healthy baby. But soon doctors confirm his parents’ worst fears: something is wrong with Bryson’s brain. Despite dozens of tests over nearly a decade, doctors come up empty in their efforts to find a diagnosis. Then one day, everything changes. Scientists working at the cutting edge of genetics believe they know what's causing Bryson's disease — and think it could be reversed. Here’s the first episode of the new CBC podcast, Unlocking Bryson’s Brain. More episodes are available at hyperurl.co/unlocking

Download Introducing Unlocking Bryson's Brain
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April 14, Part 1: Tools to end the lockdown; Inside a Toronto hospital; Having a baby during the pandemic

How do we safely move past the pandemic lockdown? We discuss two ideas to ease restrictions: tracking the spread of #COVID19 with mobile technology, and testing the population for immunity. How do these tools work, and what are the concerns around privacy, and the gaps in our knowledge about COVID-19 immunity. Then, the CBC’s Adrienne Arsenault takes us inside a Toronto hospital battling the pandemic, and Susan Ormiston discusses the mood in New York, the epicentre of the U.S. outbreak. Plus, having a baby is stressful, having a baby in a pandemic is a whole other matter. We talk to two mothers about their worries (and their joy), and a panel of experts about the steps being taken to ensure quality of care.

Download April 14, Part 1: Tools to end the lockdown; Inside a Toronto hospital; Having a baby during the pandemic
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April 13, Part 2: Vinyl Cafe; Chef Samin Nosrat; Students providing meals for front-line workers

We bring you a classic story from the Vinyl Cafe; Stuart McLean’s Tree of Heaven. Then, chef and author Samin Nosrat knows it can be tricky to get to the grocery store right now, so she explains how to get creative with the food you already have. And a McGill medical student tells us about a new platform that connects local restaurants with healthcare workers in need of a hot meal.

Download April 13, Part 2: Vinyl Cafe; Chef Samin Nosrat; Students providing meals for front-line workers
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April 13, Part 1: Quebec care home deaths; Sports withdrawal; Social media and staying connected during COVID-19

Police are investigating a Dorval, Que. long-term care home where 31 residents have died since March 13 (five deaths attributed to COVID-19). We talk to Barbara Schneider, whose mother Mary died at the facility. Then, are you a sports fan, and missing your team? Shireeen Ahmed, Morgan Campbell and Devin Heroux discuss the withdrawal many fans are feeling. Plus, Christopher Tito has been passing time in quarantine by remaking classic films on social media — all with the help of his cat Ulysses. And author Val Walker talks about staying connected to beat the loneliness of isolation.

Download April 13, Part 1: Quebec care home deaths; Sports withdrawal; Social media and staying connected during COVID-19
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April 10, Part 2: Canadian heroes on the COVID-19 response; Porch portraits; Vinyl Cafe: Sourdough

In a conversation first aired last month, astronaut Chris Hadfield, Giller Prize-winning author Madeleine Thien and Olympian Clara Hughes join us to share why they believe Canadians have what it takes to weather this pandemic. Plus, we talk to some photographers who are capturing memories (from a distance!) with what are being called “porch portraits.” Then, we’re bringing you a Canadian classic. From the Vinyl Cafe archives, we’ll hear the late Stuart McLean with the 1995 story, Sourdough. And finally, host of q Tom Power brings us chats with singer Norah Jones, screenwriter Alan Yang and props designer John Allen.

Download April 10, Part 2: Canadian heroes on the COVID-19 response; Porch portraits; Vinyl Cafe: Sourdough
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April 10, Part 1: Faith and COVID-19; Stranded Canadians come home; Seniors’ perspective on the pandemic; Fish and chips for Good Friday

We’re talking to faith leaders about how they tend to their communities during the pandemic, and why empty houses of worship this weekend don’t mean we can’t come together. Then, we hear from Canadians who were stranded abroad because of COVID-19, but have made it home against all the odds. Also, in these uncertain times, we talk to seniors who have experienced similar challenges in the past, including one 107-year-old Nova Scotian who remembers the 1918 Spanish Influenza pandemic. What can we learn from their experiences? And as some Canadians forgo meat this Good Friday, we’ll check in with a St. John’s fish and chip shop that has been serving the city for almost 70 years.

Download April 10, Part 1: Faith and COVID-19; Stranded Canadians come home; Seniors’ perspective on the pandemic; Fish and chips for Good Friday
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April 9, Part 1: COVID-19 and racial inequality; Brené Brown on vulnerability; Deciding who gets access to limited medical resources

Early data from the U.S. shows a higher death rate for African Americans from COVID-19. We discuss what Canada can do to better protect people of colour from inequalities in health care. Then, author and podcast host Brené Brown talks to Matt Galloway about how being vulnerable can help us give us the strength to face the COVID-19 pandemic. Plus, Nova Scotia woman Crystal Blair tells us she’s kept her truckstop restaurant open during the pandemic, so she can serve up free meals to the truck drivers with few options. And as COVID19 cases climb in New York, doctors face tough choices over who gets access to limited resources. Now guidelines have been published in Canada, in case our doctors have to make those same life-or-death decisions.

Download April 9, Part 1: COVID-19 and racial inequality; Brené Brown on vulnerability; Deciding who gets access to limited medical resources
[mp3 file: runs 01:11:38]


April 9, Part 2: Sharing the sidewalk; Indycar racer Robert Wickens back in the driver’s seat; David Maginley on living well; Online anxiety course; Dreams in the time of COVID-19

The pandemic means gyms are closed — and runners are taking to the streets to keep fit. How do we find ways to share our sidewalks, and keep our physical distance? Then, it's been almost two years since racecar driver Robert Wickens was nearly killed in a crash. But thanks to IndyCar's virtual iRacing series, he's back on the road and loving it. Plus, Halifax hospital chaplain David Maginley on how to live well at this scary time, and Professor Steve Joordens tells us about his online course to help manage anxiety. And while most of us are stuck at home, our dreams can go wherever they please during this pandemic. Author Alice Robb says it's no surprise people are having more vivid and memorable dreams these days, as anxiety is high. And the CBC’s Andrea Bellemare brings us the latest in efforts to fight misinformation about COVID-19 online.

Download April 9, Part 2: Sharing the sidewalk; Indycar racer Robert Wickens back in the driver’s seat; David Maginley on living well; Online anxiety course; Dreams in the time of COVID-19
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