The Current

 
 

The Current

The Current is a meeting place of perspectives, ideas and voices, with a fresh take on issues that affect Canadians today. Hosted by Anna Maria Tremonti, one of Canada's most trusted and listened-to journalists.

Updated: Daily
Download episodes from this podcast for: 3 months
Visit Show Site: http://www.cbc.ca/thecurrent

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Migrant kids in U.S. detention are separated from adults for their own safety, says former immigration judge

Lawyers representing migrant children at the southern U.S. border say the minors are being held without access to necessities like soap or toothpaste, and that many are falling ill in facilities where kids are left to care for kids. One of the lawyers tells The Current that conditions are terrible, while a former judge says the concerns are overblown.

Download Migrant kids in U.S. detention are separated from adults for their own safety, says former immigration judge
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:05]


Adult playgrounds 'reignite' childhood joy, but is that a good thing?

An indoor playground designed for adults opened in Toronto earlier this year, part of a trend gaining popularity worldwide. Despite being good fun, some experts say they can help adults deal with stress and emotional issues. Others say it's time we all just grew up a little. We hear both sides of the argument.

Download Adult playgrounds 'reignite' childhood joy, but is that a good thing?
[mp3 file: runs 00:10:04]


Digital exclusive: Anna Maria Tremonti takes questions from her listeners

After her final show as the host of The Current, Anna Maria Tremonti passed the microphone to the live studio audience. The veteran journalist answered questions on everything from her favourite books, to how her parents felt when she ran off to cover wars around the world, to why she started her career as 'Terri Tremonti.'

Download Digital exclusive: Anna Maria Tremonti takes questions from her listeners
[mp3 file: runs 00:22:14]


There is fascism in the air around the world, says famed novelist Arundhati Roy

One of India's most celebrated writers, Arundhati Roy, says that "fascism is in the air" in her homeland, and warns that the same thing is happening all over the world.

Download There is fascism in the air around the world, says famed novelist Arundhati Roy
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:48]


How Instagram saved the egg: Author argues social media has changed the way we eat

Food writer Bee Wilson says that the food we eat has changed dramatically over two generations, and so has our relationship with it. Her new book explores how the pressures of contemporary life has left us all eating the same thing, but without really much time to eat it, and sometimes not even knowing what we're putting in our bodies.

Download How Instagram saved the egg: Author argues social media has changed the way we eat
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:36]


Trump cancelling strike on Iran was both a warning, and an offer to negotiate: expert

After the downing of an American military drone, the U.S. planned limited strikes on Iran Thursday, and then abruptly cancelled them. We discuss tensions between the two countries, and fears that they could lead to outright hostilities.

Download Trump cancelling strike on Iran was both a warning, and an offer to negotiate: expert
[mp3 file: runs 00:17:44]


Our humanity 'shines' when we connect: What Anna Maria Tremonti has learned from hosting The Current

Carol Off, host of As It Happens, interviews Anna Maria Tremonti about her time as a foreign correspondent and about her departure from the show.

Download Our humanity 'shines' when we connect: What Anna Maria Tremonti has learned from hosting The Current
[mp3 file: runs 00:18:41]


Anna Maria Tremonti hosts her final edition of The Current

After 17 seasons on the air, Anna Maria Tremonti is hanging up the microphone as host of the CBC's flagship current affairs radio show, The Current. For her final outing, she hosted a special live show in the heart of the CBC Broadcast Centre in Toronto — featuring music, a live audience, special guests, and more.

Download Anna Maria Tremonti hosts her final edition of The Current
[mp3 file: runs 01:10:42]


Anna Maria Tremonti's most memorable interviews: Neil Harbisson the cyborg

In 2014, Anna Maria Tremonti chatted with self-described cyborg Neil Harbisson, who has a surgically-implanted device that has given him a sixth sense — the ability to hear colour. We listen back on that musical conversation.

Download Anna Maria Tremonti's most memorable interviews: Neil Harbisson the cyborg
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:10]


Anna Maria Tremonti's most memorable interviews: Paul Salopek the pilgrim

It's been more than six years since Paul Salopek set off on his trek across the world on foot. Along the way, he's been checking in with Tremonti to share the stories of his journey. We revisit some of their previous conversations, and get one final update from the traveller.

Download Anna Maria Tremonti's most memorable interviews: Paul Salopek the pilgrim
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:15]


Pipeline debates a sign of polarizing election campaign to come, says columnist

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has announced the approval of the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline, and our weekly national affairs panellists weigh in on this latest twist in the long-running fight, including how it might shape the fall election.

Download Pipeline debates a sign of polarizing election campaign to come, says columnist
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:31]


Are saltwater beavers a thing? Scientists observe Canadian critters in potentially deadly habitat

Our documentary A Salty Tail explores beaver behaviour that is puzzling scientists. Canada's national animal is being discovered in saltwater intertidal zones, despite the long-held understanding that the rodents only live in freshwater. Are saltwater beavers actually a thing?

Download Are saltwater beavers a thing? Scientists observe Canadian critters in potentially deadly habitat
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:48]


Anna Maria Tremonti's most memorable interviews: The Bosnian women who bore children of war

As her time at The Current comes to a close, Anna Maria Tremonti looks back at some of the most memorable conversations from her 17 seasons as the show’s host.

Download Anna Maria Tremonti's most memorable interviews: The Bosnian women who bore children of war
[mp3 file: runs 00:22:04]


Quebec's new immigration law could be attempt to win more powers from Ottawa: expert

Bill 9, the newly passed immigration legislation in Quebec, would allow the government to cancel thousands of in-progress immigration applications and impose a values test that would-be immigrants will need to pass in order to become a permanent resident.

Download Quebec's new immigration law could be attempt to win more powers from Ottawa: expert
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:17]


Turn away from social media and join 'Team Human,' urges author

Author and digital theorist Douglas Rushkoff argues that human beings are special in how they thrive off of connecting with one another. Technology makes these connections harder to maintain, he argues, and we must push back against the tech that is isolating and repressing us.

Download Turn away from social media and join 'Team Human,' urges author
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:17]


Anna Maria Tremonti's most memorable interviews: Esther the Wonder Pig

We listen back to one of Anna Maria Tremonti's favourite interviews, with the owners of Esther the Wonder Pig. Steve Jenkins and Derek Walter moved to the countryside, stop eating meat and started an animal rescue farm all because the 650-pound beauty — initially thought to be a micro pig — entered their lives and hearts.

Download Anna Maria Tremonti's most memorable interviews: Esther the Wonder Pig
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:17]


Time is 'ripe' for big businesses to get behind Canadian basketball: Men's national team GM

Two million fans are expected to show up to the Raptors' victory parade in downtown Toronto Monday morning. That kind of interest should lead to corporate sponsorship that can be used to grow the game, according to leading figures in the sport.

Download Time is 'ripe' for big businesses to get behind Canadian basketball: Men's national team GM
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:52]


'This is just the beginning': Raptors' win signals new chapter in Canadian basketball

Raptors fans across the world are waking up to the team's first day as NBA champions. We look back at a night of victory and raucous celebration, and ahead to what the win might mean for the future of basketball in Canada.

Download 'This is just the beginning': Raptors' win signals new chapter in Canadian basketball
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:55]


Anna Maria Tremonti's most memorable moments: The man who shared his $25M lottery jackpot

As her time at The Current comes to a close, Anna Maria Tremonti looks back at some of the most memorable conversations from her 17 seasons as the show’s host.

Download Anna Maria Tremonti's most memorable moments: The man who shared his $25M lottery jackpot
[mp3 file: runs 00:18:57]


Raptors fan ditches prom to watch his team 'make history' in NBA championships

Raptors fans across the world are waking up to the team's first day as NBA champions. We look back at a night of victory and raucous celebration, and what the sacrifices that some fans have made on the road here.

Download Raptors fan ditches prom to watch his team 'make history' in NBA championships
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:05]


CNN's Jim Acosta chronicles reporting under Trump, combating 'enemy of the people' rhetoric in new book

As CNN's chief White House correspondent, Jim Acosta has been on the receiving end of multiple anti-fake news remarks from U.S. President Donald Trump. In his new book, Acosta reflects on his career in a position that is regularly subject to attacks from Trump supporters and the president himself.

Download CNN's Jim Acosta chronicles reporting under Trump, combating 'enemy of the people' rhetoric in new book
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:10]


Anna Maria Tremonti's most memorable interviews: Malala Yousafzai

We look back on Anna Maria Tremonti's 2013 chat with Pakistani activist Malala Yousafzai, which took place a year after the young woman was shot by the Taliban — and a year before she won the Nobel Peace Prize.

Download Anna Maria Tremonti's most memorable interviews: Malala Yousafzai
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:33]


Hong Kong authorities are inciting protest violence, says singer and activist Denise Ho

Police in Hong Kong cracked down on pro-democracy protesters Wednesday by using tear gas, rubber bullets and pepper spray. Singer, actor and activist Denise Ho says the violence was provoked by police, not protesters.

Download Hong Kong authorities are inciting protest violence, says singer and activist Denise Ho
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:24]


Jason Kenney is using 'economic outreach' to connect with First Nations, says columnist

The federal government is expected to make a final decision about the Trans Mountain pipeline by next Tuesday. Our national affairs panel discusses how pipeline politics, and competing climate change strategies, will be major issues in this year's federal election.

Download Jason Kenney is using 'economic outreach' to connect with First Nations, says columnist
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:56]


On the Line: Meet the people living along the proposed path of the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion

Anna Maria Tremonti recently travelled the 1,150 km route of the Trans Mountain pipeline, to meet the people whose lives have become tangled up in the debate about its expansion.

Download On the Line: Meet the people living along the proposed path of the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion
[mp3 file: runs 00:45:41]


Anna Maria Tremonti's most memorable interviews: Firefighters in Fort McMurray

Anna Maria Tremonti looks back to 2016, when she spoke to firefighters who were battling the devastating wildfires in Fort McMurray, B.C.

Download Anna Maria Tremonti's most memorable interviews: Firefighters in Fort McMurray
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:58]


How Toronto Raptors' breakthrough year helps inspire Canada's next generation of basketball players

Despite a heartbreaking, one-point loss to the Golden State Warriors last night, Toronto Raptors and basketball fever is at an all-time high in Canada.

Download How Toronto Raptors' breakthrough year helps inspire Canada's next generation of basketball players
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:33]


85 years gold: Why Madhur Jaffrey would rather spice up her career than slow down

Madhur Jaffrey's latest incarnation as a rapping grandma in a music video is proof that the 85-year-old has no plans of slowing down. The "queen of Indian cooking" discusses her new cookbook, as well as politics, the Instant Pot and her-hip hop cameo with Anna Maria Tremonti.

Download 85 years gold: Why Madhur Jaffrey would rather spice up her career than slow down
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:05]


Colombia, other Latin American countries strained by flow of Venezuelan refugees, says filmmaker

As neighbouring countries deal with a "staggering" number of refugees from Venezuela, the worsening situation becomes the second-biggest migrant crisis in the world after Syria. The UN is renewing its call for international help, and we discuss the unique role Canada could play in a possible solution.

Download Colombia, other Latin American countries strained by flow of Venezuelan refugees, says filmmaker
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:43]


Anna Maria Tremonti's most memorable interviews: When Henry Kissinger walked out

In another instalment of Anna Maria Tremonti's most memorable moments on The Current, we revisit her conversation with former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger from 2003, when the interview took an unexpected turn.

Download Anna Maria Tremonti's most memorable interviews: When Henry Kissinger walked out
[mp3 file: runs 00:08:56]


Little fish, big impact: How the loss of herring hurts more than our oceans

Herring are a small fish that play a massive role in the marine ecosystem. We examine what the animal's declining population numbers mean for the oceans - and us.

Download Little fish, big impact: How the loss of herring hurts more than our oceans
[mp3 file: runs 00:16:30]


Men need to stand up and apologize for sexual abuse, says Vagina Monologues playwright Eve Ensler

Groundbreaking playwright Eve Ensler's new book is an apology, written as a letter to herself, from her abusive father. Find out why she chose to write from her deceased father's perspective and how it helped her cope with the trauma of the past.

Download Men need to stand up and apologize for sexual abuse, says Vagina Monologues playwright Eve Ensler
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:18]


Don't pity the single ladies, author says - they're probably happier than you

A new book suggests that while society expects them to be sad and lonely, single women who don't have children are actually a very happy population. Not everyone agrees with the idea, however. We chat with the author, as well as people on either side of the debate.

Download Don't pity the single ladies, author says - they're probably happier than you
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:51]


Despite growing audience, women's soccer still fighting for respect, says journalist

The Women's World Cup kicks off in France today, and FIFA is expecting record-breaking viewership numbers. But advocates for women in soccer say the organisation - and the world - still don't take the sport seriously.

Download Despite growing audience, women's soccer still fighting for respect, says journalist
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:38]


Why Jully Black wants kids to put down their phones and make a connection

A lot of people would agree that they spend too much time staring at a screen - but many of us still have a hard time tearing ourselves away. We talk to two people who want you to put down your phone, and think about the "attention economy."

Download Why Jully Black wants kids to put down their phones and make a connection
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:28]


Centuries of intrigue, turmoil and death: Why treasure hunters can't stay away from Oak Island

No one knows what's buried on Nova Scotia's Oak Island - or even whether there's anything buried there at all. This hasn't stopped explorers from hunting for treasure on the island for centuries. Author Randall Sullivan dug into the history and lore of the land, which he shares with Anna Maria Tremonti.

Download Centuries of intrigue, turmoil and death: Why treasure hunters can't stay away from Oak Island
[mp3 file: runs 00:21:48]


How to die well: What David Maginley has learned from counselling hundreds on their deathbeds

David Maginley is a hospital chaplain who sits with people on their deathbed. He shares the most common regrets people reveal, and what's holding them back from being at peace in their final hours.

Download How to die well: What David Maginley has learned from counselling hundreds on their deathbeds
[mp3 file: runs 00:28:08]


As the situation worsens in Sudan, how should the rest of the world respond?

Dozens of Sudanese pro-democracy protesters were shot and killed this week when armed forces stormed a sit-in in Khartoum. What led up to that moment, and how should the international community respond? A man who was at the protest shares his story, as well as a Sudan researcher and analyst.

Download As the situation worsens in Sudan, how should the rest of the world respond?
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:24]


A tour of flooded Toronto Island from the kids who live there

Lake Ontario's levels have reached record-breaking numbers. We meet a few children of Toronto Island, who are getting used to their watery new surroundings.

Download A tour of flooded Toronto Island from the kids who live there
[mp3 file: runs 00:04:50]


Anna Maria Tremonti's favourite interviews: Werner Herzog

As her time at The Current comes to a close, Anna Maria Tremonti looks back at some of her favourite conversations from her 17 years as the show's host.

Download Anna Maria Tremonti's favourite interviews: Werner Herzog
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:47]


Former Jehovah's Witness says she was turned away from the religion for having doubts

Amber Scorah was a Jehovah's Witness in Shanghai, trying to bring new converts on board. But then she left - both the country and the faith. Her new book Leaving the Witness chronicles why and how she got out.

Download Former Jehovah's Witness says she was turned away from the religion for having doubts
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:50]


Indigenous communities need to see government action on MMIWG, not just words, says reporter

Indigenous communities were critical of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau taking a day to say his government accepts that the murders and disappearances of Indigenous women and girls across Canada amount to an act of "genocide," says APTN reporter Kathleen Martens.

Download Indigenous communities need to see government action on MMIWG, not just words, says reporter
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:48]


Why global access to female contraceptives is critical to Melinda Gates' philanthropy

Melinda Gates speaks with Anna Maria Tremonti about her new book The Moment of Lift: How Empowering Women Changes The World, and how billionaire philanthropy is a piece of the puzzle in achieving global equity.

Download Why global access to female contraceptives is critical to Melinda Gates' philanthropy
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:26]


'Warnings were ignored': New CBC podcast explores pervasive past of sexual abuse at Ottawa high school

For decades, an Ottawa high school was the site of sexual abuse, violation of trust and a lack of action by authorities. A new CBC Podcast, The Band Played On, investigates what took place behind closed doors and why it fell on deaf ears for so long.

Download 'Warnings were ignored': New CBC podcast explores pervasive past of sexual abuse at Ottawa high school
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:44]


Call what happened to Indigenous women a genocide so we can move forward, says MMIWG inquiry's lead counsel

The inquiry into murdered and missing Indigenous women concludes there has been a "Canadian genocide," a term that has prompted mixed reactions. We discuss why the report used the term, and whether Canadians will understand what it means in this context.

Download Call what happened to Indigenous women a genocide so we can move forward, says MMIWG inquiry's lead counsel
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:41]


Populist leaders offer 'mesmerizing promise' to lure voters into a dictatorship, warns author

Author Ece Temelkuran says Western countries should look to today's Turkey as a warning for what can happen when polarization and arguing drowns out the state of democracy.

Download Populist leaders offer 'mesmerizing promise' to lure voters into a dictatorship, warns author
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:04]


'This isn't over': MMIWG inquiry wraps, but much work remains, says sister of missing woman

The national inquiry into MMIWG calls the murders and disappearances of Indigenous women a 'Canadian genocide.' We explore what the report will mean for the victims' families.

Download 'This isn't over': MMIWG inquiry wraps, but much work remains, says sister of missing woman
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:12]


RIM co-founder warns of dire consequences if big data, tech are left unchecked

Former Research in Motion co-CEO Jim Balsillie has spoken out about the business practices of large tech companies and how the government is failing to regulate them.

Download RIM co-founder warns of dire consequences if big data, tech are left unchecked
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:36]


Support your local drag queen: What three queens - from ages 10 to 87 - think about RuPaul's Drag Race

The world of drag is firmly in the mainstream these days, thanks to television shows like RuPaul's Drag Race. We talk to some performers about how this newfound popularity is affecting the art form.

Download Support your local drag queen: What three queens - from ages 10 to 87 - think about RuPaul's Drag Race
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:09]


Could the U.S. abortion battle spill over to Canada? The answer's a bit murky: writer

With abortion rights under fire in the U.S., could a similar debate happen here in Canada? We speak with CBC columnist Robyn Urback.

Download Could the U.S. abortion battle spill over to Canada? The answer's a bit murky: writer
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:42]


How a B.C. man is navigating life after a fentanyl overdose

CBC Radio's Dr. Brian Goldman brings us a voice that's too often lost in the coverage of the opioid crisis: those who survive overdoses, but struggle with the aftermath.

Download How a B.C. man is navigating life after a fentanyl overdose
[mp3 file: runs 00:16:06]


Last Mohawk code talker 'lit up' at praise for helping WWII Allies: granddaughter

We speak with the daughter and granddaughter of Louis Levi Oakes, the last of the Second World War Mohawk code talkers. He died this week, at the age of 94.

Download Last Mohawk code talker 'lit up' at praise for helping WWII Allies: granddaughter
[mp3 file: runs 00:10:29]


Following death of his 2-year-old daughter, this author had to find 'a way to live in the world again'

Jayson Greene and his wife Stacy lived through the unimaginable when their two-year-old daughter Greta died unexpectedly. Greene wrote a memoir to chronicle his journey from profound grief to healing; he shares that story with us.

Download Following death of his 2-year-old daughter, this author had to find 'a way to live in the world again'
[mp3 file: runs 00:28:09]


Cancelling plans and spending thousands: Meet the sports superfans going all out

There are sports fans... and then there are superfans. We speak to the folks who live and breathe team colours, including skipping out on social obligations and spending thousands of dollars a year to support their team.

Download Cancelling plans and spending thousands: Meet the sports superfans going all out
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:05]


'Little by little': How this woman is saying goodbye to single-use plastics

Concerns over mounds of Canadian plastic waste in Malaysia and the Philippines have amplified the issue of non-recyclable plastic. We explore what it would take to reduce the use of single-use plastics in daily life.

Download 'Little by little': How this woman is saying goodbye to single-use plastics
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:49]


UFO sightings by U.S. Navy should be taken seriously - but not too seriously, says astronomer

Recent UFO sightings have come from some unusually reliable sources, prompting the Pentagon to introduce new reporting regulations for pilots spotting things in the sky. Is the stigma of talking about flying saucers starting to fade?

Download UFO sightings by U.S. Navy should be taken seriously - but not too seriously, says astronomer
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:29]


Facebook's head of public policy says he'd welcome regulation, but warns it's easier said than done

Kevin Chan, head of public policy for Facebook Canada, speaks to Anna Maria Tremonti about his company's record on privacy and the fight against fake news amid growing criticism, including CEO Mark Zuckerberg and COO Sheryl Sandberg ignoring a summons to appear before the Canadian government.

Download Facebook's head of public policy says he'd welcome regulation, but warns it's easier said than done
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:58]


Wilson-Raybould, Philpott may have rejected the Greens to keep Liberal door open, pundit says

This week's panel discussion delves into privacy and democracy in an age of increasingly powerful tech companies, as well as the role of Independent MPs.

Download Wilson-Raybould, Philpott may have rejected the Greens to keep Liberal door open, pundit says
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:46]


Veteran Mount Everest climber describes crowds stepping over bodies in the snow

A recent spate of deaths on Mount Everest has prompted concerns over the numbers of climbers being allowed to attempt the summit. But one experienced climber say that individuals also bear a responsibility, and must have the humility to know when to turn back.

Download Veteran Mount Everest climber describes crowds stepping over bodies in the snow
[mp3 file: runs 00:17:47]


Hope can be a double-edged sword when life feels 'meaningless,' says author Mark Manson

In this vast universe, it's easy to feel as though life is fleeting. We talk to author Mark Manson about his latest book, Everything is F--ked: A Book About Hope, and why he says hope can be destructive to our happiness.

Download Hope can be a double-edged sword when life feels 'meaningless,' says author Mark Manson
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:56]


This B.C. woman lodged hundreds of 911 complaints about the homeless. Now she's advocating for them

We bring you the story of a B.C. woman who spent nearly 15 years trying to bar the homeless from trespassing on her property, but is now advocating for them.

Download This B.C. woman lodged hundreds of 911 complaints about the homeless. Now she's advocating for them
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:59]


How fear of the Soviets inspired a U.S. scheme to bomb the moon

When the Soviet Union successfully launched the Sputnik spacecraft into orbit in 1957, the U.S. reacted with fear and a desire to prove its own worth. The solution? A proposal to detonate nuclear weapons on the moon. Author Vince Houghton tells us all about it.

Download How fear of the Soviets inspired a U.S. scheme to bomb the moon
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:41]


Tower of London welcomes its first raven chicks in 3 decades

Last fall, we introduced you to Christopher Skaife, the ravenmaster of the Tower of London. This spring, he's welcoming the first raven chick to have hatched on the property in 30 years. He tells us what new ravens mean for the fate of the kingdom.

Download Tower of London welcomes its first raven chicks in 3 decades
[mp3 file: runs 00:07:58]


B.C. ruling will 'dial down tension' on Trans Mountain, but not for long: professor

In a unanimous decision released Friday, the B.C. Court of Appeal says British Columbia does not have the right to impose environmental laws that could kill the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion.

Download B.C. ruling will 'dial down tension' on Trans Mountain, but not for long: professor
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:15]


Canada's wild pig populations are on the rise. How big of a problem is this?

Wild pigs are smart, hardy, and multiplying, proving to be a major force to contend with in cities, farmers fields and beyond. Their numbers in Canada are rising - what could this population boom mean for us?

Download Canada's wild pig populations are on the rise. How big of a problem is this?
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:18]


CBC's Jason D'Souza goes back to highschool

What happens when you send a journalist back to high school? CBC's Jason D'Souza brings the answer, having spent a month attending classes at L.A. Matheson Secondary School in Surrey, B.C.

Download CBC's Jason D'Souza goes back to highschool
[mp3 file: runs 00:16:38]


Theresa May's successor will face 'exactly same problem' of divided Britain, says historian

British Prime Minister Theresa May has announced her departure date, after months of crises and humiliation over her Brexit plan. But her resignation won't solve the larger problems with Brexit, says author and historian Anne Applebaum.

Download Theresa May's successor will face 'exactly same problem' of divided Britain, says historian
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:59]


'Deep grief, and outrage': Family of Colten Boushie shares frustration at justice system in new film

The shooting death of Colten Boushie in Saskatchewan in 2016 was national news. Now, a new documentary lingers on the perspective of his family, and puts their story in the context of how the Canadian legal system has treated Indigenous people. We speak to a member of the young man's family, one of their lawyers, and the documentary's director.

Download 'Deep grief, and outrage': Family of Colten Boushie shares frustration at justice system in new film
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:06]


'They followed me everywhere': Reporter tailed, deterred while investigating Uighur detention in Xinjiang

What's really happening inside China's so-called "training camps" for the country's Uighur ethnic minority? Globe and Mail Asia correspondent Nathan Vanderklippe has been following that story for years; he tells Anna Maria Tremonti about what he's seen.

Download 'They followed me everywhere': Reporter tailed, deterred while investigating Uighur detention in Xinjiang
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:46]


Fire-driven weather is 'new reality' for Canada and elsewhere, expert cautions

An evacuation order remains in place for High Level, Alta., as a wildfire rages south of the town. We hear from some of the people living in limbo, and examine a phenomenon you might not have heard of: the 'firenado.'

Download Fire-driven weather is 'new reality' for Canada and elsewhere, expert cautions
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:54]


Case of 'white supremacist' professor raises debate about free speech vs. hate speech on campus

A University of New Brunswick professor has been criticized for his activities outside of the classroom, including appearances on far-right podcasts and YouTube channels, and authoring blog posts with headlines like "Only Whites Can Teach Western Civilization." Where does academic freedom end and hate speech begin? We discuss free speech in the university landscape.

Download Case of 'white supremacist' professor raises debate about free speech vs. hate speech on campus
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:16]


Exploring the dark side of a widely-celebrated psychological experiment

Author Gina Perry explores Muzafer Sherif's famous 1950s experiment in "realistic conflict theory," where unknowing young boys were driven to conflict, in an effort to see if peace coulld then be engineered. Perry argues the experiment has a dark side, and should be considered in its full context.

Download Exploring the dark side of a widely-celebrated psychological experiment
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:48]


Pipelines are irrelevant in the debate over Bill C-69, reporter argues

There are two controversial bills currently before the Senate, both with a focus on pipeline and the energy industry. Our national affairs panel unpacks the political pull between environmental concerns and economical incentives - and how it might impact the upcoming federal election.

Download Pipelines are irrelevant in the debate over Bill C-69, reporter argues
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:55]


U.S.-Iran war unlikely: John Bolton is all bark, no bite, says columnist

Should the world be bracing for a U.S.-Iran war? We hear from the experts who have been keeping a close eye on the escalating tensions between Washington and Tehran.

Download U.S.-Iran war unlikely: John Bolton is all bark, no bite, says columnist
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:20]


'A no-brainer': Why reporter Mark Bowden revisited crime case that haunted him for decades

Mark Bowden was a young reporter when two young sisters were abducted from a mall in 1975, and never found. Forty years later, police found a suspect that had been under their noses the whole time - and Bowden returned to the crime for his new book The Last Stone.

Download 'A no-brainer': Why reporter Mark Bowden revisited crime case that haunted him for decades
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:26]


Poland's LGBT community gets unexpected allies because of a painting looted by Nazis

Poland's LGBT community just gained a pair of unexpected allies in their fight for equality: a gay Californian couple who learned a painting in their kitchen was looted from the eastern European country by Nazis.

Download Poland's LGBT community gets unexpected allies because of a painting looted by Nazis
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Why this writer says burnout carries 'a different weight' for people of colour

A Buzzfeed essay arguing millennials have become the burnout generation has struck a chord with many people since it went viral this month, but one woman says burnout isn't a new phenomenon solely affecting white, middle-class people.

Download Why this writer says burnout carries 'a different weight' for people of colour
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Medieval era was more diverse - and less violent - than Game of Thrones would have you believe, says expert

Game of Thrones has finally come to an end, after eight seasons of political power struggles, epic battles and dragons. We look at the show's cultural impact, as well as its treatment of women and people of colour.

Download Medieval era was more diverse - and less violent - than Game of Thrones would have you believe, says expert
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Original Toronto Raptor Tracy Murray on how the team became so important to Canadians

We look at the popularity of the Toronto Raptors, talking to Tracy Murray, one of the players who was there when it all began.

Download Original Toronto Raptor Tracy Murray on how the team became so important to Canadians
[mp3 file: runs 00:22:18]


It will take 'rewiring all of us' to change myths about sexual assault victims: reporter

A 2012 video of an RCMP officer asking an Indigenous teenager if she was "turned on" by an alleged sexual assault was condemned as "absolutely abhorrent" by Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale this week. We discuss the video, and what more needs to be done to support survivors.

Download It will take 'rewiring all of us' to change myths about sexual assault victims: reporter
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Farmer says weed killer Roundup is vital to his businesses, despite allegations it causes cancer

Earlier this week, a jury awarded $2 billion US in damages to a California couple who claim the weed killer Roundup gave them cancer. But not everyone agrees that the chemical in question - glyphosate - is harmful, and some farmers here in Canada say it's vital to their work.

Download Farmer says weed killer Roundup is vital to his businesses, despite allegations it causes cancer
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Niagara servers protest policy forcing them to share tips with management

Servers in Ontario are striking over changes to their tip out - the portion of tips they share with kitchen workers and other staff. One worker says the amount they gave away doubled overnight, and alleges it's all going to salaried managers. We look at tipping culture in Canada.

Download Niagara servers protest policy forcing them to share tips with management
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Alabama anti-abortion legislation shows 'abysmal lack of knowledge' on trauma of sexual assault: survivor

We look at the implications of Alabama's new restrictions on abortion. The legislation has no exceptions for rape or incest unless the mother's life is in danger, and threatens doctors who perform abortion with 99 years in jail.

Download Alabama anti-abortion legislation shows 'abysmal lack of knowledge' on trauma of sexual assault: survivor
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Liberalism is constantly under siege but always comes out on top, says author

We speak to writer Adam Gopnik about his new book A Thousand Small Sanities: The Moral Adventure of Liberalism, and why he believes liberals have nothing to apologize for.

Download Liberalism is constantly under siege but always comes out on top, says author
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Money laundering is Canada's problem - not just the West Coast's, expert warns

B.C. is launching a public inquiry to examine money laundering in the province, after two reports found more than $7 billion was laundered in the province last year. We speak to two experts who say it's not just a west-coast problem, and all of Canada should be concerned.

Download Money laundering is Canada's problem - not just the West Coast's, expert warns
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You can help people with schizophrenia by looking past the delusion, says writer

Susan Doherty has been volunteering to help people with severe mental illness for more than a decade. She's written about what she's learned in her new book The Ghost Garden: Inside the Lives of Schizophrenia's Feared and Forgotten.

Download You can help people with schizophrenia by looking past the delusion, says writer
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What today's labour movement can learn from the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike

On the 100th anniversary of what has become known as the Winnipeg General Strike, we take a look back at the milestone moment in the history of labour relations and politics for this country.

Download What today's labour movement can learn from the 1919 Winnipeg General Strike
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Mark Norman, SNC-Lavalin controversies may hamper Liberal election run: reporter

Our political panel weighs in on the fallout from the Mark Norman case, discussing it in light of the SNC-Lavalin affair. Could the consecutive controversies have an impact on the fall election?

Download Mark Norman, SNC-Lavalin controversies may hamper Liberal election run: reporter
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:39]


Why the former chair of the TRC is worried about the Indian day school settlement

The federal government has offered survivors of Indian day schools a settlement - but is it enough? Former students are divided. We look at the settlement, and hear concerns from Sen. Murray Sinclair, who served as chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

Download Why the former chair of the TRC is worried about the Indian day school settlement
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:38]


World's last male northern white rhino was 'ambassador of extinction': filmmaker

A new documentary chronicles Kenyan rangers and their efforts to care for the last northern white male rhino. The rangers wanted to bring audiences face-to-face with extinction and the challenges of protecting endangered wildlife.

Download World's last male northern white rhino was 'ambassador of extinction': filmmaker
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:15]


History will judge 'reckless, even criminal' politicians ignoring climate change crisis: Elizabeth May

Elizabeth May has been at the helm of the federal Green Party for over a decade. What has this historic year for the party been like for her, and how will she leverage this momentum going into the fall election? She discusses these topics and more with Anna Maria Tremonti.

Download History will judge 'reckless, even criminal' politicians ignoring climate change crisis: Elizabeth May
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'We need to build allies': How Canada should navigate the escalating U.S.-China trade war

Tensions between China and the U.S. are escalating, with both countries imposing tariffs on the other's imports. We look at the dispute, and the knock-on effect it could have on Canada.

Download 'We need to build allies': How Canada should navigate the escalating U.S.-China trade war
[mp3 file: runs 00:28:49]


Surfing should be a 'rebel yell,' not an Olympic event, critic argues

Surfing will be an Olympic sport for the first time at the 2020 Games in Tokyo, but not everyone agrees it should be included. Some surfers argue that it's a corporate move, which betrays the counterculture at the heart of catching some waves. We hear both sides of the debate.

Download Surfing should be a 'rebel yell,' not an Olympic event, critic argues
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Your smartphone is ruining your sex life, says renowned sex therapist Dr. Ruth

Dr. Ruth Westheimer has been offering advice on sex and intimacy for decades, and she's not done yet. She speaks to Anna Maria Tremonti about a new documentary on her life and career, and why she thinks our smartphones are ruining our sex lives.

Download Your smartphone is ruining your sex life, says renowned sex therapist Dr. Ruth
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:52]


Having less sex? Why experts say there's no need to panic

A recent study from Britain found people are having less sex, even though many respondents said they wanted to be having more. We ask why sex matters, and what it says that we're going with less of it.

Download Having less sex? Why experts say there's no need to panic
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:25]


Harvard scientist fears advancements in genetic manipulation 'much more than war'

There are few things more frightening than the spectre of biological warfare - from anthrax to weaponized viruses. We speak with the man being recognized for his pioneering work in having biological weapons banned internationally.

Download Harvard scientist fears advancements in genetic manipulation 'much more than war'
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:38]


Facebook has become one of world's 'most dangerous monopolies,' says expert

You may have had thoughts about breaking up with Facebook, by deleting your account. Now one of the company's co-founders is calling on Uncle Sam to dismantle the social media giant itself. But is it an idea worth "liking"? Our experts debate the pros and cons.

Download Facebook has become one of world's 'most dangerous monopolies,' says expert
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:17]


What Uber's IPO could say about its role in the market

Uber is expected to make an initial public stock offering on Friday, in a move the tech giant hopes will raise billions of dollars. But it comes on the heels of protests by rideshare drivers who are worried about the ethical and economic implications of Uber's dominance. We'll hear from a driver who took part in Thursday's protests, and from a technology columnist who calls Uber a "moral stain" on Silicon Valley.

Download What Uber's IPO could say about its role in the market
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:14]


Many Americans 'shooting themselves in the foot' to maintain racial hierarchy: author

We speak with author Jonathan Metzl about his new book, Dying of Whiteness: How the Politics of Racial Resentment is Killing America's Heartland.

Download Many Americans 'shooting themselves in the foot' to maintain racial hierarchy: author
[mp3 file: runs 00:18:40]


Kawhi Leonard could be the 'truly great player' Raptors need, sports writer says

They were once dismissed as a joke in purple uniforms. Now, the Toronto Raptors' fanbase and success has reached new heights, and they've proven themselves as legitimate playoff heavyweights. Sports writer Cathal Kelly joins us to explain the rise of the Raptors.

Download Kawhi Leonard could be the 'truly great player' Raptors need, sports writer says
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Why Bill 21 has some feeling freedom of expression is an 'illusion' in Quebec

If Quebec's Bill 21 gets the green light, some civil servants could be banned from wearing religious symbols on the job. But not everyone is on board with the idea. We hear from groups on both sides of the debate who are giving their two cents at the ongoing legislative hearings on the bill.

Download Why Bill 21 has some feeling freedom of expression is an 'illusion' in Quebec
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:22]


'It's not fair that TB is still in Canada': One Nunavut woman on life with the disease

Tuberculosis is a disease many Canadians never have to worry about. But for some, it's an all-too-common fact of life. Kilikvak Karen Kabloona opens up about life with TB, and why a disease the rest of the country has largely done away with still has a hold in the North.

Download 'It's not fair that TB is still in Canada': One Nunavut woman on life with the disease
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:38]


Scheer has yet to distinguish himself from previous Conservative leaders, expert says

After a tumultuous winter in Ottawa, Andrew Scheer's Conservatives find themselves at the top of the polls - just as this fall's federal election starts to come into focus. But who is he? And what does he stand for? Our political panel weighs in.

Download Scheer has yet to distinguish himself from previous Conservative leaders, expert says
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How the New York Times' top lawyer stands up to Trump's attacks on media

Lawyer David McCraw has fought some of the New York Times's toughest and most controversial legal battles. The newspaper's vice-president and deputy general counsel tells us about his new book, Truth in Our Times: Inside the Fight for Press Freedom in the Age of Alternative Facts.

Download How the New York Times' top lawyer stands up to Trump's attacks on media
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Inclusive education isn't living up to its name, former special ed teacher says

On Monday, the New Brunswick government announced plans to track the number of students who attend school part-time because of behavioural or developmental issues. We hear from a parent and educational studies professor about just how inclusive - or not - the education system is, and what they think needs to change.

Download Inclusive education isn't living up to its name, former special ed teacher says
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Meet the woman who went to the brink of death, and back, to treat her depression

Heather B. Armstrong went to the brink of death 10 times as part of an experiment trial to reverse the effects of depression on her brain. We speak to the author about the life-changing experience, and hear from an expert at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health about new technologies for treating depression.

Download Meet the woman who went to the brink of death, and back, to treat her depression
[mp3 file: runs 00:32:20]


'A reaffirmation of what we know': Grim UN biodiversity report unsurprising to many scientists, First Nations

A new UN report paints a grim picture of the amount of damage done to the earth's biodiversity at the hands of humankind. Unnerving, yes, but are these findings unexpected? Not for First Nations communities and scientists, community members tell us.

Download 'A reaffirmation of what we know': Grim UN biodiversity report unsurprising to many scientists, First Nations
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:30]


Trial of NXIVM leader will reveal dark underbelly of sex cult, expert says

For almost two decades, NXIVM promised to help its members find self-fulfillment and personal success through courses and workshops. On Tuesday, its leader Keith Raniere will stand trial for his alleged role in the subjugation and abuse of women through the group, which the FBI has dubbed a cult. We speak to the host of the podcast Uncover: Escaping NXIVM about what to expect from the court proceedings, and hear from a woman who escaped a cult herself.

Download Trial of NXIVM leader will reveal dark underbelly of sex cult, expert says
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How the Satanic Temple aims to promote pluralism in the U.S.

We speak with the director of the new film Hail Satan? about a group called the Satanic Temple, and hear from the organization's co-founder about how it's working to defend pluralism.

Download How the Satanic Temple aims to promote pluralism in the U.S.
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:40]


As permafrost thaws in Canada's Arctic, locals and researchers raise 'alarm bells'

As the planet warms, its normally-frozen layer of permafrost is melting. We talk to northerners about how it's impacting their communities, and hear from a researcher studying the situation.

Download As permafrost thaws in Canada's Arctic, locals and researchers raise 'alarm bells'
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As Frank Zappa is resurrected as a hologram, expert warns wishes of dead artists should be considered

Frank Zappa is the latest in a series of famous artists to have a hologram created in his image, giving people the chance to see a digital version of the performer, live in concert once more. But while some critics say these hologram concerts are an entertaining way to keep music alive, others argue that it's a morbid cash grab that doesn't consider the wishes of the dead.

Download As Frank Zappa is resurrected as a hologram, expert warns wishes of dead artists should be considered
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:59]


Chinese police app 'illegally' tracks ethnic Uighurs' everyday lives, says Human Rights Watch

Human Rights Watch says it has proof of a massive system of state surveillance in the Chinese region of Xinjiang, and that it's being used to target the country's Uighur minority. The advocacy group says there's even an app used by police to log the minute details of an individual's movements, and build cases for detention.

Download Chinese police app 'illegally' tracks ethnic Uighurs' everyday lives, says Human Rights Watch
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Military aid should only be a last resort for natural disaster relief, says expert

There are more soldiers deployed within Canada than there are overseas right now, with many of the personnel on home soil helping to battle the severe flooding in several provinces. But if climate change is going to make extreme weather more common, does Canada need to stop relying on the army, and create a new group to lead disaster relief?

Download Military aid should only be a last resort for natural disaster relief, says expert
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China's one-child policy was enforced through abortion and sterilization, says documentary director

Two film directors, Nanfu Wang and Jialing Zhang, returned to their native China to examine the country's former one-child policy. They told Anna Maria Tremonti that they were shocked by what they found, and the violence with which it was enforced.

Download China's one-child policy was enforced through abortion and sterilization, says documentary director
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How a former rival had a change of heart about Caster Semenya's right to compete

Olympic champion Caster Semenya lost her appeal against the IAAF's testosterone rules, and many have embraced the move, saying it will level the playing field. The pushback, however, has also been swift; critics argue the decision is discriminatory, paternalistic and hypocritical.

Download How a former rival had a change of heart about Caster Semenya's right to compete
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:38]


Oilfields are economy of the past, expanding them would be like building a Blockbuster video, says lawyer

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney may have backed down from "turning off the taps" to B.C., but says his decision is only conditional upon B.C. reversing its opposition to the Trans Mountain Pipeline.

Download Oilfields are economy of the past, expanding them would be like building a Blockbuster video, says lawyer
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Indie opera is enticing newcomers, but is it enough to keep the genre relevant?

There's a growing indie opera scene in Canada, led by troupes determined to bring the artform to a wider audience. That might mean ditching the concert hall for a performance in your local pub, but it also means more work for performers, and could boost the industry overall. Music credits: "Policeman's aria" from "Harrison" by Domenic Jarlkaganova Brittany Rae, soprano Lindsay Connolly, director Daniel Arthur, music director

Download Indie opera is enticing newcomers, but is it enough to keep the genre relevant?
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Competitive spelling bees show Gen Z kids aren't interested in participation trophies: author

Author Shalini Shankar talks us through the world of spelling bees, and the insight they give into the aspirations and psychology of Generation Z. Shankar says these kids, born in the late 90s and 2000s, have seen the world as competitive from a young age, and they're not afraid to fight for their spot.

Download Competitive spelling bees show Gen Z kids aren't interested in participation trophies: author
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'We need China more than they need us': Canada's options limited for quelling tensions with Beijing

Our political panel weighs in on the latest twists and turns in Canada's corridors of power, including tensions with China, and developments in the SNC-Lavalin affair.

Download 'We need China more than they need us': Canada's options limited for quelling tensions with Beijing
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:01]


How former Bruins winger Willie O'Ree kept his vision impairment a secret from the NHL

Willie O'Ree was the first black man to ever play for the NHL, but racism wasn't the only thing he had to overcome to make his hockey dreams come true. The hockey legend sat down with Anna Maria Tremonti to talk about re-learning how to play after losing an eye - and why he's still involved with the league today.

Download How former Bruins winger Willie O'Ree kept his vision impairment a secret from the NHL
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:33]


Second Amendment supporters should be 'deeply concerned' about NRA infighting, says conservative pundit

The NRA was keeping up appearances at its annual convention this past weekend, but behind closed doors, chaos engulfs the organization. What could the internal conflict mean for the future of the group - and its role in American politics? Our panellists weigh in.

Download Second Amendment supporters should be 'deeply concerned' about NRA infighting, says conservative pundit
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As floodwaters wreak havoc in eastern Canada, impact on mental health can be 'profound,' says sociologist

The physical damage caused by floods across Quebec, Ontario and New Brunswick are hard to miss - but they're also leaving an emotional toll among citizens forced from their homes that may linger years after repairs to infrastructure are completed.

Download As floodwaters wreak havoc in eastern Canada, impact on mental health can be 'profound,' says sociologist
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Canadians held in China will feel 'forgotten,' says artist and dissident Ai Weiwei

Ai Weiwei says he understands what two Canadians detained in China are going through, because he himself spent months in a Chinese jail. He speaks to Anna Maria Tremonti about China's rise to power, and his new film about powerless refugees in Europe.

Download Canadians held in China will feel 'forgotten,' says artist and dissident Ai Weiwei
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:58]


Meals, medical aid and more: The evolving role of public libraries and what they stand to lose

From cooking classes to acting as a community hub, public libraries are offering much more than books these days, even as the institutions face funding cuts. We explore the evolving role of libraries, and who those cuts will affect.

Download Meals, medical aid and more: The evolving role of public libraries and what they stand to lose
[mp3 file: runs 00:28:00]


Expectant mother worries hospital staffing shortage may mean 200 km drive to give birth

Stephanie Ellis is among pregnant women in Nova Scotia who may have to travel long distances to give birth, due to staffing shortages at their nearest hospital. Separately, in a video that went viral last week, Inez Rudderham said the cancer she is battling went undiagnosed for two years because she didn't have a family doctor. The video has shone a spotlight on health care across the country, and concerns that recruitment problems are leaving patients with nowhere to turn.

Download Expectant mother worries hospital staffing shortage may mean 200 km drive to give birth
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:23]


How floating homes could guard against floodwater damage

We check back in on Quebec's rising floodwaters, and examine how other jurisdictions have mitigated flooding, including 'amphibious homes'.

Download How floating homes could guard against floodwater damage
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:18]


'Killing Patient Zero' profiles Quebec man unfairly targeted in AIDS epidemic

The new documentary "Killing Patient Zero" tells the story of the Quebec flight attendant who was wrongly blamed for the spread of AIDS.

Download 'Killing Patient Zero' profiles Quebec man unfairly targeted in AIDS epidemic
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:25]


6 years after Rana Plaza collapse, many fashion giants still unwilling to make changes, says industry expert

It's been six years since the Rana Plaza garment factory collapsed, killing more than 1,000 people. What's changed for workplace safety since then? One expert tells us that, if anything, labour conditions have gotten worse.

Download 6 years after Rana Plaza collapse, many fashion giants still unwilling to make changes, says industry expert
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:40]


Populism can be positive and constructive - even when fuelled by anger, says Preston Manning

As the founder of two federal political parties - both of which became the official opposition - Preston Manning has been called the godfather of Canadian conservatism. He talks to Anna Maria Tremonti about his history with the movement, and what he thinks of the political landscape today.

Download Populism can be positive and constructive - even when fuelled by anger, says Preston Manning
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:06]


'A landlord on speed': Documentary shows how trading homes on stock market is pushing up rent worldwide

A new documentary argues that the global shortage of affordable housing is not just a simple matter of neighbourhood gentrification, but something much more complex. We speak to the documentary's director, and the UN's Special Rapporteur on Adequate Housing, about the problem.

Download 'A landlord on speed': Documentary shows how trading homes on stock market is pushing up rent worldwide
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:44]


'Canada is in the wrong': Environmentalists urge the country to clear out its trash from the Philippines

More than 100 containers of Canadian garbage have been sitting in a Manila port for years, after being mistakenly sent there as recyclable material. Now the President of the Philippines, Rodrigo Duterte, says he will "declare war" if Canada doesn't take the trash back. We get all the details on the diplomatic stink.

Download 'Canada is in the wrong': Environmentalists urge the country to clear out its trash from the Philippines
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:17]


'People don't like change': Why tough action on climate change is such a hard sell

Our national affairs panel discusses how Canada's leaders are dealing with climate change - and whether they've convinced the public to join the fight.

Download 'People don't like change': Why tough action on climate change is such a hard sell
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:35]


Blocking social media could do more harm than good for Sri Lanka, journalist warns

In the wake of Sunday's bombings, Sri Lanka imposed a social media blackout to stop the spread of misinformation and limit the chance of further attacks. But some experts argue that the measure just isolates ordinary people in a time of mass trauma and mourning. We hear both sides of the debate.

Download Blocking social media could do more harm than good for Sri Lanka, journalist warns
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:42]


This woman won't have children because of climate change. She says she's not alone

We speak to a woman so concerned about climate change that she has decided not to have children. She says she's not alone, and has found solidarity with hundreds of others who feel the same.

Download This woman won't have children because of climate change. She says she's not alone
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:58]


Homes in high-risk floodplains should be subject to mandatory buyouts, says expert

As parts of Quebec suffer serious flooding for the second time since 2017, one expert warns that by helping them to rebuild, authorities are just risking it happening again and again.

Download Homes in high-risk floodplains should be subject to mandatory buyouts, says expert
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:07]


How letters from migrants shed light on the 'intolerable' conditions inside U.S. detention centres

Appalled that migrants were being funnelled into a U.S. detention centre near their home, a group of San Diego residents starting writing letters, to the migrants themselves. And then the migrants wrote back, starting a conversation about the conditions they face, and what those ordinary on the outside could do to help.

Download How letters from migrants shed light on the 'intolerable' conditions inside U.S. detention centres
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:06]


'I tried to bury it down': NDP leader Jagmeet Singh says he was sexually abused as a child

In his new book, NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh alleges he was sexually abused as a child. He speaks to Anna Maria Tremonti about the abuse, and why he hopes his revelation will help other survivors.

Download 'I tried to bury it down': NDP leader Jagmeet Singh says he was sexually abused as a child
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:21]


Sri Lanka bombings likely orchestrated by outside force, expert says

We hear updates and reaction on the attacks in Sri Lanka, including what the massacre could mean for an already fractured community.

Download Sri Lanka bombings likely orchestrated by outside force, expert says
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:55]


11 Years: A Blueprint For Climate Action

We listen back to our special episode on climate change, and the ranging global efforts to address it.

Download 11 Years: A Blueprint For Climate Action
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:46]


Family of woman killed in Toronto van attack donates piano to Mel Lastman Square

As Toronto prepares to mark the one-year anniversary of the deadly van attack on Yonge St, the family of one victim shares how they have found comfort in helping others.

Download Family of woman killed in Toronto van attack donates piano to Mel Lastman Square
[mp3 file: runs 00:22:27]


Mueller report won't sway public opinion enough for Democrats to attempt impeaching Trump: journalist

After much anticipation, U.S. special counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election has finally been made public - except for the redacted parts, that is. But what we do know about the report's contents is plenty to talk about. A panel of experts talk us through it.

Download Mueller report won't sway public opinion enough for Democrats to attempt impeaching Trump: journalist
[mp3 file: runs 00:22:50]


This author thinks reading to your children an hour a day could help the whole family

Reading to children out loud isn't just a source of warm feelings and lovely memories; research shows it can also help developing brains. Journalist Meghan Cox Gurdon, the children's book critic for the Wall Street Journal, tells us about the miraculous power of story time.

Download This author thinks reading to your children an hour a day could help the whole family
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:42]


How citizen science is changing the research landscape

Online communities and new technology are making it easier than ever for anyone to get involved in scientific research. But how reliable is user-generated data? And what value does it bring to major studies?

Download How citizen science is changing the research landscape
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:41]


Mueller report released to Congress

As the Mueller report is released to Congress Thursday, we discuss what kind of impact - if any - its findings could have on how Republicans and Democrats alike see Trump.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:12:44]


Baby blues vs. postpartum depression: How can new parents tell the difference?

On Monday, we heard the heartbreaking stories of mothers who suffered the isolation and agony of postpartum depression. We continue the discussion with a doctor who specializes in the condition, and ask what needs to be done to help new parents receive the treatment they need.

Download Baby blues vs. postpartum depression: How can new parents tell the difference?
[mp3 file: runs 00:17:46]


'A real access-to-justice issue': Why lawyers are reluctant to take on medical malpractice suits

A new CBC News Investigation has examined data going back decades and found that the number of patients who successfully sue doctors over medical mistakes is small - and getting smaller. We ask why it's so hard to sue doctors in Canada, even in cases of patient death.

Download 'A real access-to-justice issue': Why lawyers are reluctant to take on medical malpractice suits
[mp3 file: runs 00:15:28]


Notre-Dame fire just another chapter in the life of a historic monument, says medievalist

The fire that ravaged Notre-Dame prompted an outpouring of sadness over the damage suffered by the iconic structure - as well as billions in funding pledged to restore it. We speak to a medievalist about the life cycle of iconic monuments like the Paris cathedral, and the idea that they are never destroyed, but live and change with the ages.

Download Notre-Dame fire just another chapter in the life of a historic monument, says medievalist
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:49]


Hell does freeze over (and other things you never knew about damnation)

The more author Marq de Villiers learned about hell, the more he thought 'what the hell?' He speaks to Anna Maria Tremonti about how different cultures and different religions have approached the idea of damnation, and why he wanted to write a sinner's guide to eternal torment.

Download Hell does freeze over (and other things you never knew about damnation)
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:38]


Jason Kenney's big win positions him as Canada's true conservative leader, political scientist says

United Conservative Party Leader Jason Kenney won big in Alberta's provincial election Tuesday, seizing a majority and ending the province's first-ever NDP government. Our national affairs panel looks at the promises Kenney made on the campaign trail, and what his premiership might mean for the election battle coming this fall.

Download Jason Kenney's big win positions him as Canada's true conservative leader, political scientist says
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:07]


Federal-versus-provincial powers take centre stage in Ontario carbon tax court battle

Ontario premier Doug Ford takes his fight over the so-called federal carbon tax to a Toronto courtroom this week, in a bid to have the measure ruled unconstitutional. We weigh up the arguments about provincial authority, and national health and the fight against climate change.

Download Federal-versus-provincial powers take centre stage in Ontario carbon tax court battle
[mp3 file: runs 00:22:05]


Red Cross nurse Louisa Akavi was likely kidnapped by ISIS for her medical skills, global security expert says

Five years after a New Zealand nurse was captured by ISIS, her story is finally being told, as efforts to rescue her go public. We speak to two experts about why authorities fought to keep Louisa Akavi's name out of the headlines, and what's changed.

Download Red Cross nurse Louisa Akavi was likely kidnapped by ISIS for her medical skills, global security expert says
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'You cannot rebuild the dust': A restored Notre-Dame won't be the same, says Bernard-Henri Lévy

The world watched in horror Monday as fire ravaged Notre-Dame in Paris, an international landmark that has withstood war and disaster for centuries. We speak to an eyewitness and a prominent French intellectual about the cathedral's cultural significance, and the loss felt both in France and around the world.

Download 'You cannot rebuild the dust': A restored Notre-Dame won't be the same, says Bernard-Henri Lévy
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Isolated and invisible: Meet the moms writing about the secret agony of postpartum depression

Teresa Wong and Amanda Munday both struggled with postpartum depression, a condition reported to affect as many as 20 per cent of Canadian mothers. Both women have written books about their experiences, from their feelings of inadequacy, to difficulties breastfeeding, and even being admitted to a psychiatric ward.

Download Isolated and invisible: Meet the moms writing about the secret agony of postpartum depression
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After complaints from parents, Our Planet director defends footage of walruses plummeting to their death

Netflix nature documentary Our Planet has provoked an angry response from people caught off guard by one graphic scene. Parents say their children were traumatized by video of walruses falling from a cliff to their deaths, but the program's makers say the scene was caused by climate change, and is an important story to tell. We look at the ethics and arguments that go into bringing these types of stories to the screen.

Download After complaints from parents, Our Planet director defends footage of walruses plummeting to their death
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As Alberta election looms, some voters 'stuck' on who to support

In the run-up to Alberta's provincial election Tuesday, we speak to three voters about what's on their minds - from the local economy to the province's relationship with Ottawa.

Download As Alberta election looms, some voters 'stuck' on who to support
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Beijing-funded classes on China for Canadian kids is a lesson in propaganda: expert

Students in New Brunswick have been learning about Chinese language, food and culture in weekly half-hour classes paid for by the Confucius Institute. What they're not taught is anything remotely controversial, such as China's record on human rights violations. Are the classes a lesson in soft power and propaganda?

Download Beijing-funded classes on China for Canadian kids is a lesson in propaganda: expert
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Assange's legacy could be undermined by his own 'selfish attitude': former diplomat

The arrest of Julian Assange Thursday starts a new chapter in the saga of the Wikileak's founder. We ask how the world should view him and what will be his legacy: as a whistleblower, a free-speech fighter, or a traitor?

Download Assange's legacy could be undermined by his own 'selfish attitude': former diplomat
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Joy in Sudan becomes anger over 'recycled regime', says protester who vows to keep fighting

A military coup ended the 30-year rule of Omar Al-Bashir in Sudan this week, after months of protests on the streets of Khartoum. But the situation is far from settled. Demonstrators have rejected the decision to set up a transitional military council to run the country for two years, and vowed to continue protests until a civilian government is established. We speak to people on the ground about what happens next.

Download Joy in Sudan becomes anger over 'recycled regime', says protester who vows to keep fighting
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New exhibit displays artwork of residential school students

A new art exhibit at the Museum of Vancouver displays the work of Indigenous children attending residential and day schools. It's titled There is Truth Here, and curator Andrea Walsh says that at this point in our nation's history, these pieces compel us to stop and listen.

Download New exhibit displays artwork of residential school students
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The human cost of highly-priced insulin

Diabetes can cost Canadians $15,000 a year if they don't have any help and that demands a national strategy, says Kimberley Hanson, who lives with Type 1 diabetes and is the executive director for federal affairs at Diabetes Canada.

Download The human cost of highly-priced insulin
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Years after fleeing war-torn Syria, this man learns what's left of his old home

When the UN's Chris Reardon found himself in the old neighbourhood of his friend and Syrian refugee Hani Al Moulia, he wrote a letter to share with Al Moulia. The two friends reconnect in a discussion with Anna Maria Tremonti, and Al Moulia, now settled in Canada, processes what's left of his old life in Syria.

Download Years after fleeing war-torn Syria, this man learns what's left of his old home
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Julian Assange's arrest is 'a vendetta, not justice,' says friend Vaughan Smith

Julian Assange was arrested and removed from the Ecuadorian embassy in London Thursday, where he has lived under asylum since 2012. His friend Vaughan Smith spoke to Anna Maria Tremonti about the developments.

Download Julian Assange's arrest is 'a vendetta, not justice,' says friend Vaughan Smith
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Superbugs like deadly Candida auris are part of a drug-resistance 'crisis,' says doctor

There is growing concern around Candida auris, a life-threatening and stubbornly drug-resistant fungus that has been showing up all over the world in the past decade.

Download Superbugs like deadly Candida auris are part of a drug-resistance 'crisis,' says doctor
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Love, anger and grief: Animals can display wide range of humanlike emotions, says author

Do chimpanzees feel love the same way that humans do? Author and primatologist Frans de Waal says yes - and not only that, he says many animals feel a wide range of emotions that have historically been considered exclusive to the human race.

Download Love, anger and grief: Animals can display wide range of humanlike emotions, says author
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P.E.I. election could be a breakthrough moment for the Green Party, says pollster

While the SNC-Lavalin affair might not seal the P.E.I. Liberal party's fate, pollster David Coletto says a positive showing for the surging Green Party may convince more Canadians that it is a viable alternative option.

Download P.E.I. election could be a breakthrough moment for the Green Party, says pollster
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Facebook's hate speech ban is 'part of the problem' with online division, expert warns

What should governments and tech companies do to combat the online spread of white nationalism and other forms of extremism? We talk to tech entrepreneur Vidhya Ramalingam and analyst/professor Taylor Owen.

Download Facebook's hate speech ban is 'part of the problem' with online division, expert warns
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Adult playgrounds 'reignite' childhood joy, but is that a good thing?

A new indoor playground designed for adults has opened in Toronto, part of a trend gaining popularity worldwide. Despite being good fun, some experts say they can help adults deal with stress and emotional issues. Others say it's time we all just grew up a little. We hear both sides of the argument.

Download Adult playgrounds 'reignite' childhood joy, but is that a good thing?
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Mother whose 9-year-old daughter died of asthma welcomes London's new low-emission zones

A new Ultra Low Emission Zone came into effect this week in London, U.K., meaning that drivers will have to pay to drive anything but the greenest vehicles through the centre of the capital. We look at efforts around the world, and speak with a mother who says air pollution near their south London home played a role in the death of her nine-year-old daughter.

Download Mother whose 9-year-old daughter died of asthma welcomes London's new low-emission zones
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Climate change opening up new resources in the Arctic, and a new fight to claim them

Russia's latest display of military might in the Arctic highlights a coming tug-of-war over influence in the far north. Is Canada ready to protect its interests?

Download Climate change opening up new resources in the Arctic, and a new fight to claim them
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As Nova Scotia switches to opt-out option for organ donation, expert examines the ethics of government 'nudging'

Nova Scotia has introduced a "presumed consent" system for organ donation, meaning that people must opt out if they don't want to donate. The idea behind it - "nudging" citizens into better choices - is part of a global trend steeped in behavioural science, but not everyone agrees. Tim Harford, who writes The Undercover Economist column for the Financial Times, argues that the tactic should be used carefully, and warns there is a darker flipside.

Download As Nova Scotia switches to opt-out option for organ donation, expert examines the ethics of government 'nudging'
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25 years after the Rwandan genocide, this retired Canadian soldier still lives with horror of what he saw

Retired Major Brent Beardsley was in Rwanda when the genocide started 25 years ago this week. He talks to Anna Maria Tremonti about watching the world turn its back as the massacre unfolded, and the PTSD that he still lives with today.

Download 25 years after the Rwandan genocide, this retired Canadian soldier still lives with horror of what he saw
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'A grotesque travesty': Inuit men hanged in 1923 to assert Canada's control over the north, says author

In 1923, two Inuit men were tried for murder and executed, in a trial now seen as deeply flawed. Author and forensic anthropologist Debra Komar says the men were sacrificed in Canada's push for Arctic sovereignty.

Download 'A grotesque travesty': Inuit men hanged in 1923 to assert Canada's control over the north, says author
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Scheer 'almost salivating' at the prospect of Trudeau lawsuit, but it won't happen, says legal expert

Leader of the Opposition Andrew Scheer struck a defiant tone Sunday when he revealed that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau had threatened him with a lawsuit, over remarks made by Scheer on the SNC-Lavalin scandal. But will the lawsuit ever see the light of day?

Download Scheer 'almost salivating' at the prospect of Trudeau lawsuit, but it won't happen, says legal expert
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Quebec nurses strike against 'being taken hostage' for overtime shifts

Nurses in Quebec say mandatory overtime has left them exhausted, demoralized, and feeling like they've been "taken hostage." As they strike Monday, we hear from experts who say we should be concerned about staff and patients across Canada.

Download Quebec nurses strike against 'being taken hostage' for overtime shifts
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Woman who has never felt pain hopes scientists can study her DNA to help others

Jo Cameron has a remarkable gene mutation that leaves her unable to feel pain or anxiety. We speak to Cameron about how it affects her daily life, and how the rare condition could be the key to groundbreaking treatment options.

Download Woman who has never felt pain hopes scientists can study her DNA to help others
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Tackling money laundering in B.C. is like a game of 'whack-a-mole,' says AG

The B.C. government introduced legislation this week to curb tax evasion and money laundering, by creating Canada's first public registry of property owners that would stop anonymous owners hiding behind shell and numbered companies. The new laws come on the heels of a pledge from Ottawa to create a multi-agency task force to tackle the problem on a national scale, but will it be enough?

Download Tackling money laundering in B.C. is like a game of 'whack-a-mole,' says AG
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Albertans want a leader who sees Trudeau as an adversary, not an ally: pollster

We check in on the provincial election in Alberta, asking whether any party has taken the lead following Thursday's televised leaders' debate.

Download Albertans want a leader who sees Trudeau as an adversary, not an ally: pollster
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Former teacher says there's no proof larger class sizes hurt students' learning experience

Students in Ontario are staging a walk-out this week to protest provincial policy changes that they say threaten their education. We hear from students, parents, teachers and researchers about one of their concerns: class sizes, an issue that animates those in education across all of Canada.

Download Former teacher says there's no proof larger class sizes hurt students' learning experience
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After escaping Rwanda's genocide, this woman confronted the neighbour who handed her over to would-be killers

Twenty-five years ago in Rwanda, close to a million Tutsi Rwandans were massacred in 100 days. We speak to a woman who survived that genocide, and went on to settle in Canada.

Download After escaping Rwanda's genocide, this woman confronted the neighbour who handed her over to would-be killers
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Inside the 'brief conversation' in which Jane Philpott was expelled from the Liberal caucus

Jane Philpott, one of the former ministers at the centre of the SNC-Lavalin affair, speaks to Anna Maria Tremonti about the scandal and her recent expulsion from the Liberal caucus.

Download Inside the 'brief conversation' in which Jane Philpott was expelled from the Liberal caucus
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'It destroys your humanity': Albert Woodfox on surviving 44 years in solitary confinement

Albert Woodfox spent more than forty years in solitary confinement for a 1972 murder he says he didn't commit. He speaks to Anna Maria Tremonti about how he survived decades inside a 9 foot by 6 foot cell, in one of the most notorious prisons in the United States.

Download 'It destroys your humanity': Albert Woodfox on surviving 44 years in solitary confinement
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Trudeau tried doing politics differently by not expelling former ministers sooner, says columnist

Our political panel takes stock of the latest twists and turns through Canada's corridors of power, today looking at the ousting of Jody Wilson-Raybould and Jane Philpott from the Liberal caucus.

Download Trudeau tried doing politics differently by not expelling former ministers sooner, says columnist
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'Get used to being disrupted': Expert warns of the financial implications of climate change

A new study from scientists at Environment and Climate Change Canada this week warns that the country is warming more quickly than the rest of the world. What can Canadians do to adapt and fight climate change?

Download 'Get used to being disrupted': Expert warns of the financial implications of climate change
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'Lack of investment in women's sports' to blame for demise of Canadian Women's Hockey League

The Canadian Women's Hockey League has announced it will cease operations as of May 1, citing an "economically unsustainable" business model. But is the league's demise a matter of profit, or the value we place on women's sports?

Download 'Lack of investment in women's sports' to blame for demise of Canadian Women's Hockey League
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Introducing Uncover: The Village

Two waves of murders, 40 years apart. Who's killing men in Toronto's gay community and why are they getting away with it? Subscribe now at cbc.ca/uncover.

Download Introducing Uncover: The Village
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Changes to veterans' disability claims could cause PTSD rather than treat it, advocate warns

Veterans applying for disability benefits now have to fill out a new, shorter government questionnaire on PTSD, which eliminates some specific questions, and references to symptoms including nightmares, flashbacks and emotional numbing. Officials with Veterans Affairs Canada say the shorter form will be more efficient, but advocates warn that the change is going to make it harder for veterans to qualify for help, and could lead to more suicides.

Download Changes to veterans' disability claims could cause PTSD rather than treat it, advocate warns
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New CBC podcast explores unsolved homicides in Toronto's LGBTQ community

Journalist Justin Ling talks to Anna Maria Tremonti about Uncover: The Village, the new season of the CBC podcast. As host, Ling explores the investigation into serial killer Bruce McArthur, and unsolved homicides in Toronto's LGBTQ community.

Download New CBC podcast explores unsolved homicides in Toronto's LGBTQ community
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Digital technology is reshaping our world - and coders are deciding how, says author

Digital technology has become an integral part of our daily lives, but one author argues that the computer code underlying all our apps is also influencing how our society and wider world develops, and the people doing the coding are making decisions with far-reaching implications.

Download Digital technology is reshaping our world - and coders are deciding how, says author
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Stuck in a 'really bad bind,' Zeballos residents defy months-long evacuation order in wake of B.C. wildfire

A forest fire damaged the mountainside above the tiny village of Zeballos, B.C. last year, creating a risk that rocks and trees could tumble on to the homes below. After an evacuation order dragged on for months, residents began to move back, despite the threat that the scorched mountain could give way.

Download Stuck in a 'really bad bind,' Zeballos residents defy months-long evacuation order in wake of B.C. wildfire
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Nunavut Premier Joe Savikataaq on progress, ongoing challenges on territory's 20th anniversary

On the 20th anniversary of Nunavut becoming a Canadian territory, we speak to Premier Joe Savikataaq about the improvements made for the people who live there, and the challenges they still face.

Download Nunavut Premier Joe Savikataaq on progress, ongoing challenges on territory's 20th anniversary
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Carbon tax will turn sustainability efforts into a fight for bottom line, warns farmer

The federal government's carbon tax comes into effect Monday in the four provinces that have not yet introduced their own carbon pricing scheme. Depending on who you are and where you live, it's either a triumph for the environment, or bad news for your bottom line.

Download Carbon tax will turn sustainability efforts into a fight for bottom line, warns farmer
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Researchers are getting closer to a male birth control gel, but will men use it?

Researchers are exploring options for male contraceptives similar to the pill, and scientists say they're getting closer to putting something on the shelves. But will men take them, will women trust men to take them - and why didn't this happen years ago?

Download Researchers are getting closer to a male birth control gel, but will men use it?
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Are scientists asking the right questions when it comes to testing Alzheimer's drugs?

The cancellation of a clinical trial for a potential Alzhemier's drug is raising questions over the feasibility of the "amyloid hypothesis" - a specific theory for a cure that scientists have been pursuing for years. Do scientists need to start exploring new avenues?

Download Are scientists asking the right questions when it comes to testing Alzheimer's drugs?
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Teacher opposed to Quebec secularism bill says she should be able to choose what she wears

The Quebec government has tabled its long-awaited secularism bill, laying down proposed ground rules it says will ensure religious neutrality. We hear from two teachers with opposing views on whether the hijab should be worn at the head of the classroom.

Download Teacher opposed to Quebec secularism bill says she should be able to choose what she wears
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How are tensions between Ottawa and Beijing affecting the Chinese-Canadian community?

Tensions between Ottawa and Beijing are lingering over the Huawei affair and the detention of two Canadian citizens in China. In recent weeks, canola exporters in Canada say they've seen contracts dry up, with some suggesting the diplomatic row has spilled over into trade relations. We hear from a panel of Chinese-Canadians about how these issues are affecting their community.

Download How are tensions between Ottawa and Beijing affecting the Chinese-Canadian community?
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'I was profoundly afraid': New book explores life-long process of understanding transgender identity

Lorimer Shenher knew he was transgender from a young age, but did not transition until later in life. He has written about the experience in his new book This One Looks Like a Boy: My Gender Journey to Life as a Man.

Download 'I was profoundly afraid': New book explores life-long process of understanding transgender identity
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Journalists let 'animus towards Trump' override objectivity in Mueller coverage: columnist

In covering the allegations of Russian collusion against U.S. President Donald Trump, did the media measure up to its own standards of objectivity? Or were some organizations overcome by their own bias, reporting their hopes as facts? We hear from both sides of the debate.

Download Journalists let 'animus towards Trump' override objectivity in Mueller coverage: columnist
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'Get those machines out of the clubs': N.L. residents still grappling with 'addictive' video lottery terminals

A class-action lawsuit in Newfoundland and Labrador is putting a new spotlight on an old problem: addiction to video lottery terminals. We hear from people fighting to have these VLTs removed from bars, and those who say the economic benefits outweigh the human cost.

Download 'Get those machines out of the clubs': N.L. residents still grappling with 'addictive' video lottery terminals
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Living with lice for a decade became a metaphor for the shame of poverty, says writer Alicia Elliott

Author Alicia Elliott wants Canadians to think about how colonialism, poverty and mental health affect families in our society. Those issues affected her own childhood, which she's written about in her new book A Mind Spread Out On The Ground.

Download Living with lice for a decade became a metaphor for the shame of poverty, says writer Alicia Elliott
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The Current's political panel: SNC-Lavalin, China tensions, and Maxime Bernier's search for candidates

Our political panel takes stock of the latest twists and turns through Canada's corridors of power, today looking at developments in the SNC-Lavalin affair, tensions with China, and Maxime Bernier's search for candidates for his new party, the People's Party of Canada.

Download The Current's political panel: SNC-Lavalin, China tensions, and Maxime Bernier's search for candidates
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'I feel I am not alone anymore': Afghan woman shot in face by her husband is building a new life in Canada

Afghan woman Shakila Zareen came to Canada after she was shot in the face by her husband. The CBC's Laura Lynch has been with the young woman as she rebuilds her life in a new country.

Download 'I feel I am not alone anymore': Afghan woman shot in face by her husband is building a new life in Canada
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Some young Brits are calling for a new Brexit vote. Others argue it's undemocratic

British MPs have voted to take control of the Brexit process, prompting speculation that Prime Minister Theresa May could soon name her own departure date. We explore the latest twist in the Brexit saga, and ask how young voters are feeling.

Download Some young Brits are calling for a new Brexit vote. Others argue it's undemocratic
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'Seen as part of the job': Ontario nurses, PSWs report 'pervasive' abuse in long-term care facilities

A new study looks at the violence suffered by staff in Ontario's long-term care facilities, at both the hands of residents and their families. We speak to the author of the study, as well as one nurse who ended up going to the police over the abuse she says she faced.

Download 'Seen as part of the job': Ontario nurses, PSWs report 'pervasive' abuse in long-term care facilities
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