The Current

 
 

The Current

The Current is a meeting place of perspectives, ideas and voices, with a fresh take on issues that affect Canadians today.

Updated: Daily
Download episodes from this podcast for: 3 months
Visit Show Site: http://www.cbc.ca/thecurrent

All podcast episodes

Use the links below to download a file.

The Current Weekly: Wet'suwet'en protests, Vancouver's wrestling scene, campus mental health

Matt is in Vancouver this week bringing you stories from BC, starting with one of the biggest stories in the country: the fight over the Coastal Gaslink Pipeline. Then, some pro wrestlers in Vancouver's growing scene teach Matt the ropes. And he speaks to Santa Ono, the president of UBC, about addressing the crisis in campus mental health and Ono's own history with mental health issues.

Download The Current Weekly: Wet'suwet'en protests, Vancouver's wrestling scene, campus mental health
[mp3 file: runs 00:34:09]


A scandal in Canada's running community

Members of Canada's running community are reeling because of sexual misconduct allegations made against one of the country's top coaches, and many are calling for more to be done to empower and protect female athletes going forward.

Download A scandal in Canada's running community
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:08]


Hogan's Alley: A hidden piece of Vancouver's black history

A tiny Vancouver neighbourhood called Hogan's Alley was once the hub of black life in Vancouver. Now, there's a growing movement to try to bring it back to life.

Download Hogan's Alley: A hidden piece of Vancouver's black history
[mp3 file: runs 00:06:52]


The Wet'suwet'en solidarity protests and the federal government

For many joining the protests across the country, solidarity with members of BC's Wet'suwet'en Nation goes beyond just opposition to the coastal gaslink pipeline. But with VIA cancelling most of the trains across the country and CN cancelling trains in Eastern Canada due to blockades, there's growing pressure on the federal government to resolve the situation. Our national affairs panel weighs in on Ottawa's response to the issues, and what this means for reconciliation.

Download The Wet'suwet'en solidarity protests and the federal government
[mp3 file: runs 00:17:02]


Addressing the student mental health crisis

Advocates say the numbers of students suffering from anxiety and depression amounts to a mental health crisis on Canadian campuses. We talk to UBC president Santa Ono, who knows the issues both professionally and personally.

Download Addressing the student mental health crisis
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:30]


Haisla First Nation in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside

A former addict from Kitimat, B.C., now works in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside looking for members of the Haisla First Nation who are struggling because he wants them to know someone cares.

Download Haisla First Nation in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside
[mp3 file: runs 00:21:29]


Vancouver’s wrestling boom

The growing world of independent wrestling is challenging the stereotypes of the mainstream. Matt gets a hands-on lesson and talks to wrestlers and fans about the new frontier of pro wrestling.

Download Vancouver’s wrestling boom
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:13]


Coronavirus and Canadian trade

Businesses in Vancouver are suffering because of the coronavirus outbreak and experts say they’re not alone ⁠— there’s significant economic fallout in Canada and beyond.

Download Coronavirus and Canadian trade
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:15]


Hereditary chiefs of the Wet'suwet'en First Nation oppose the Coastal GasLink pipeline

The hereditary chiefs of the Wet'suwet'en First Nation oppose the Coastal GasLink pipeline in B.C., and protests to support them have spread across the country. We talk to Chief Woos, one of the hereditary chiefs of the Wet'suwet'en First Nation; Scott Fraser, B.C.'s Minister for Indigenous Relations and Reconciliation; and Peter Grant, legal counsel for the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs.

Download Hereditary chiefs of the Wet'suwet'en First Nation oppose the Coastal GasLink pipeline
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:31]


'The physical legacy of struggle and sacrifice': How Chinatown is part of Vancouver's past — and its future

The Current's Matt Galloway set up shop in Vancouver’s Chinatown and talked with planners, restaurateurs, business leaders and more about what’s happening in the changing neighbourhood, and what’s next.

Download 'The physical legacy of struggle and sacrifice': How Chinatown is part of Vancouver's past — and its future
[mp3 file: runs 01:05:55]


Proxy votes for politicians on parent leave

Should politicians on parental leave be able to vote by proxy? We talk to a panel of politicos who argue the provision would encourage more people with young families to run for office, and set an example that could make the work-parenting balance easier for everyone.

Download Proxy votes for politicians on parent leave
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:07]


Port McNeill Mayor Gaby Wickstrom

Port McNeill Mayor Gaby Wickstrom talks about her relief at a tentative agreement to end the seven-month-long Western Forest Products strike.

Download Port McNeill Mayor Gaby Wickstrom
[mp3 file: runs 00:06:33]


Ramesh Srinivasan on big tech

We speak to author and professor Ramesh Srinivasan, who says we need a digital bill of rights, and an alternative to the big tech companies that control so much of our digital lives.

Download Ramesh Srinivasan on big tech
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:37]


President Xi Jinping’s handling of coronavirus

Chinese President Xi Jinping appeared in public yesterday, for the first time since the coronavirus outbreak began. How is the public reacting to his handling of the crisis? We talk to the Globe and Mail's Asia Correspondent Nathan Vanderklippe, and Lynette Ong, associate professor of political science at the Munk School of Global Affairs.

Download President Xi Jinping’s handling of coronavirus
[mp3 file: runs 00:17:06]


Philip Rucker and Carol Leonnig on Trump

After his acquittal last week, what will U.S. President Donald Trump do next? Pulitzer Prize-winners Philip Rucker and Carol Leonnig are here to discuss their book A Very Stable Genius: Donald J. Trump's Testing of America.

Download Philip Rucker and Carol Leonnig on Trump
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:25]


Dominic LeBlanc’s return to the House

Cabinet minister Dominic LeBlanc has recently returned to the House of Commons for the first time since he was diagnosed with a rare form of blood cancer. He sat down with Rosemary Barton to talk about simultaneously fighting cancer, and an election.

Download Dominic LeBlanc’s return to the House
[mp3 file: runs 00:13:20]


Green shoots in the ashes of the Australian bushfires

After devastating wildfires in Australia, photographs of green shoots in the burnt-out bush have sparked hope. Photographer Murray Lowe joins us to discuss his images, which went viral when he posted them online.

Download Green shoots in the ashes of the Australian bushfires
[mp3 file: runs 00:10:27]


Syria crisis

Syrian and Russian forces are advancing on the last opposition strongholds in Idlib province and around Aleppo, forcing civilians to flee from the falling bombs. We talk to Dr. Farida Almouslem, who is caught up in the displacement, as well as United Nations representative Mark Cutts, and journalist Kareem Shaheen.

Download Syria crisis
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:19]


Health Minister Patty Hajdu on coronavirus quarantine

We talk to federal Health Minister Patty Hajdu about the 176 people beginning quarantine in Ontario after flying in from the coronavirus outbreak in Wuhan. What are the ethics behind protective measures like this?

Download Health Minister Patty Hajdu on coronavirus quarantine
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:21]


As Ireland heads to the polls, is reunification with the North on voters' minds?

Ireland holds a general election tomorrow, with Sinn Féin leading in the polls. Part of their manifesto is the reunification of the Republic with Northern Ireland. Has Brexit put that idea in voters’ minds?

Download As Ireland heads to the polls, is reunification with the North on voters' minds?
[mp3 file: runs 00:11:43]


Raptors on the rise

The Raptors are on a roll, is Toronto headed to the championship again? Sonali Karnick and Morgan Campbell throw it all on the court.

Download Raptors on the rise
[mp3 file: runs 00:13:39]


One month after Flight 752, families are left with grief and lingering questions

It’s been one month since an Iranian missile brought down Ukrainian Airlines Flight 752, killing 176 people and plunging scores more into shock and grief. Hamed Esmaeilion lost his ninr-year-old daughter Reera, and his wife Parisa Eghbalian. Rehana Dhirani lost her father, Ali Asgar Dhirani. They talk to Matt Galloway about mourning the people they loved, and the lingering questions.

Download One month after Flight 752, families are left with grief and lingering questions
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:08]


The Current Weekly: Desmond Cole; locusts; the secret life of second-hand stuff; caught on a cruise ship; using AI to track the coronavirus

Activist and writer talks to us about his his new book The Skin We’re In: A Year of Black Resistance and Power. We check in with a Kenyan helping lead the fight against the near-unprecedented swarms of locusts in eastern Africa. Adam Minter guides us through the surprising second life of your stuff, after you dump it at the Goodwill; a man quarantined on a cruise ship due to a coronavirus outbreak tells us how he's holding up; and we speak to the Toronto doctor behind Blue Dot, a company using AI to help predict where the virus will go next.

Download The Current Weekly: Desmond Cole; locusts; the secret life of second-hand stuff; caught on a cruise ship; using AI to track the coronavirus
[mp3 file: runs 00:37:40]


Airbnb rules to curb violent incidents

A series of violent incidents at Airbnb rentals has prompted the company to roll out new roles in Toronto, Ottawa and Halifax, including not renting entire homes to anyone under 25. Will it be enough? We ask Alex Dagg, head of public policy for Airbnb in Canada, and Bill Stewart, from the Halifax group Neighbours Speak Up.

Download Airbnb rules to curb violent incidents
[mp3 file: runs 00:16:26]


Desmond Cole on racism in Canada

Desmond Cole discusses his new book, The Skin We’re In, about being black in Canada, and why he embraces being called a radical.

Download Desmond Cole on racism in Canada
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:24]


Conditions and frustration in Wuhan

We hear from people in Wuhan who say the Chinese government has played down the coronavirus outbreak at home.

Download Conditions and frustration in Wuhan
[mp3 file: runs 00:07:36]


Coronavirus on two quarantined cruise ships

More than 7,000 people are now confined to their cabins on two different luxury cruise ships in Asia, all thanks to coronavirus outbreaks onboard. Kent Frasure is on the Diamond Princess, he tells us how he’s coping. Plus, we talk to epidemiologist Tara Smith, and Iain Hay, managing director of Anchor Hygiene Service, about how susceptible cruise ships are to these kinds of outbreaks.

Download Coronavirus on two quarantined cruise ships
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:34]


Fixing parking

You might think of parking as boring, but the father of parking policy, Donald Shoup, promises it isn’t. He’s here to open your eyes to how "fixing" parking can help save cities.

Download Fixing parking
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:39]


Introducing Uncover: Satanic Panic

Throughout the 1980s, Satanic cults were widely believed to be terrorizing and torturing children. There were hundreds of false allegations and countless lives torn apart — but never any real proof. Uncover: Satanic Panic from CBC Podcasts is out now. Subscribe at cbc.ca/uncover

Download Introducing Uncover: Satanic Panic
[mp3 file: runs 00:37:02]


Satanic Panic

In the 1980s and early ‘90s, rumours spread of Satanic cults torturing children. Charges were laid, but no evidence found, and the lives altered are now the subject of Satanic Panic, a new CBC podcast hosted by Lisa Bryn Rundle.

Download Satanic Panic
[mp3 file: runs 00:06:29]


Locusts in Africa

We talk to Abdinoor Ole Hussein in Kenya. He is one of the people fighting swarms of locusts wreaking devastation across whole countries in Africa. Rachel Cleetus, policy director for the climate and energy program at the Union for Concerned Scientists, says more help is needed for the next rainy season.

Download Locusts in Africa
[mp3 file: runs 00:14:18]


State of the Union

The CBC’s Lyndsay Duncombe joins us from Washington to discuss what U.S. President Trump said, and how Democrats reacted.

Download State of the Union
[mp3 file: runs 00:08:50]


National affairs panel

Our national affairs panel discusses Ottawa’s response to the coronavirus outbreak and Canada’s bid for a seat on the UN security council.

Download National affairs panel
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:41]


Ontario teachers strike

Ontario teachers are hitting the picket lines again this week — but what makes some parents support them, while others are frustrated with the strike action? We'll hear from two parents with different points of view.

Download Ontario teachers strike
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:41]


The global secondhand economy

What happens to all your stuff after you drop it off to a goodwill store? In his new book, journalist Adam Minter takes a deep dive into the global secondhand economy. He tells us what he found.

Download The global secondhand economy
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:51]


How will coronavirus develop?

Will coronavirus become a global pandemic? We're checking in with the scientists studying, tracking and trying to predict what the novel coronavirus might do next.

Download How will coronavirus develop?
[mp3 file: runs 00:17:19]


Iowa caucus confusion

The CBC’s Susan Ormiston takes us behind the confusion at the Iowa caucus, where technology problems have delayed a clear result for the Democrats hoping to clinch the 2020 nomination.

Download Iowa caucus confusion
[mp3 file: runs 00:06:27]


Coronavirus vaccine

What will it take to get a coronavirus vaccine out quickly, and safely? We talk to a few of the hundreds of scientists racing to answer that question.

Download Coronavirus vaccine
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:11]


Helping migrants build lives outside Canada's big cities

Newcomers to Canada often settle in our biggest cities, but the federal government wants to help immigrants move to fill labour gaps in smaller towns and rural communities. The small city of Winkler, Man., has been doing just that for years. Nina Pinlac-Manuguid and her husband Randolph moved there, opening a restaurant and joining the city’s success story of supporting and retaining newcomers.

Download Helping migrants build lives outside Canada's big cities
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:05]


Iowa caucuses

The CBC’s Susan Ormiston brings us an update from Iowa, at the first of the caucuses to choose the Democrat’s presidential nominee.

Download Iowa caucuses
[mp3 file: runs 00:07:20]


Ezra Klein on polarization

We talk to Ezra Klein about his new book, Why We're Polarized, about the roots and consequences of the extreme vitriol and partisanship seen in today’s politics.

Download Ezra Klein on polarization
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:11]


Introducing More with Anna Maria Tremonti

More with Anna Maria Tremonti takes you deep into conversation — and to some unexpected places — with high-profile guests and rising stars. Each episode will leave you feeling like you've spent an evening with smart friends who make you think differently about the world, and maybe even yourself. Subscribe for free at cbc.ca/more

Download Introducing More with Anna Maria Tremonti
[mp3 file: runs 00:50:14]


Virtual product placement

New tech will let advertisers insert virtual products into finished TV and films, using your online data to tailor the placement to the viewer. Could that mean E.T. ends up eating your favourite candy, and not Reese's Pieces? And how will viewers react?

Download Virtual product placement
[mp3 file: runs 00:12:59]


Howard Bryant on black athletes who stand up to status quo

Ahead of Super Bowl Sunday we hear from Howard Bryant on the price black athletes play when they stand up to leagues and the status quo.

Download Howard Bryant on black athletes who stand up to status quo
[mp3 file: runs 00:14:09]


UN report warns of ISIS resurgence

A UN report shows a resurgence of ISIS in the Middle East. Journalist Rukmini Callimachi joins us to unpack the strategy and circumstance behind the renewed threat.

Download UN report warns of ISIS resurgence
[mp3 file: runs 00:08:15]


Port-out fraud

Port-out fraud lets scammers steal your phone number, and then access everything from your banking information to online shopping apps. Samantha Burnet tells us what happened to her, and the struggle she’s faced in finding help, while digital rights advocate Jesse Schooff discusses what needs to be done about it.

Download Port-out fraud
[mp3 file: runs 00:15:22]


Brexit day

After years of tension, public discord and diplomatic wrangling, Britain formally leaves the EU today. We talk to people on both sides of the divisive issue about this moment in Brexit, from jubilation to dismay.

Download Brexit day
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:06]


The Current Weekly - 75 years after Auschwitz; the ex-Republican operative who wants to help the Dems; the broader impacts of the coronavirus

On the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, Torontonian Edith Grosman tells us her incredible story of survival at the Nazi death camp. Journalist Andrea Pitzer talks about how concentration camps persist around the world today. Rick Wilson, a veteran Republican political strategist, tells us why he's offering his campaigning skills to the Democrats. And we talk to two people dealing with the secondary impacts of the coronavirus: Frank Ye, who says he's seeing a serious increase in discrimination against people of Chinese descent, and Wayne Duplessis, who lives with his family in Wuhan — and isn't planning to leave.

Download The Current Weekly - 75 years after Auschwitz; the ex-Republican operative who wants to help the Dems; the broader impacts of the coronavirus
[mp3 file: runs 00:35:46]


Do federal parties have more to do on LGBT rights in Canada?

Conservative leadership hopefuls are pledging to march in pride parades, something Andrew Scheer refused to do. But do all the federal parties have more to do on LGBTQ rights?

Download Do federal parties have more to do on LGBT rights in Canada?
[mp3 file: runs 00:22:28]


Republican Rick Wilson on how the Democrats can win

Long-time Republican Rick Wilson has helped the party win election campaigns for decades, but with the prospect of a second Trump term, he’s offering his skills to the Democrats. He tells us why.

Download Republican Rick Wilson on how the Democrats can win
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:50]


Canadian choosing to stay in coronavirus-hit Wuhan

Amid the coronavirus outbreak in Wuhan, Canadian Wayne Duplessis tells us why he and his family have decided to stay in the city. Plus, we talk to disease ecologist Jonathan Epstein about the theory the disease has originated with bats.

Download Canadian choosing to stay in coronavirus-hit Wuhan
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:49]


Teck Frontier oilsands mine

We look at the deep divisions over the proposed Teck Frontier oilsands mine in Alberta, and competing concerns about the economy and the environment. The government must weigh these factors as it decides whether to approve the mine, an enormous facility half the size of Edmonton.

Download Teck Frontier oilsands mine
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:29]


National affairs panel on the Conservative leadership race

So far, the race to be the next leader of the Conservative Party seems to be defined by who doesn’t want the job. Our national affairs panel of conservative strategists discuss who, and what, the party needs.

Download National affairs panel on the Conservative leadership race
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:14]


Nike's controversial new high-tech running shoe, the Vaporfly

There are claims that Nike's Vaporfly can make you run 4 per cent faster — and that advantage has the sport’s governing body, World Athletics, considering banning it. Do high-tech running shoes like this give some athletes an unfair advantage, and challenge the very essence of running?

Download Nike's controversial new high-tech running shoe, the Vaporfly
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:26]


Anna Maria Tremonti on her new podcast More

Our former host Anna Maria Tremonti drops by to fill us in on her new podcast, More.

Download Anna Maria Tremonti on her new podcast More
[mp3 file: runs 00:08:54]


Coronavirus and stigma

Are fears about coronavirus fuelling xenophobia and stigma? After thousands signed a petition calling on school boards north of Toronto to send home children — if their family members have recently travelled to China — we talk to Chinese-Canadians about what they’re experiencing.

Download Coronavirus and stigma
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:54]


Canada’s role in Venezuela

As Venezuelan politician Juan Guaidó visits Ottawa, trying to shore up support, we discuss what role Canada should play in breaking the political stalemate in Venezuela.

Download Canada’s role in Venezuela
[mp3 file: runs 00:17:45]


Harry and Meghan’s right to privacy

Harry and Meghan left the U.K. in part to flee the paparazzi, but the cameras were waiting for them here. What is a reasonable expectation of privacy in Canada for the recently-royal couple? And what about the rest of us mere mortals?

Download Harry and Meghan’s right to privacy
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:08]


Legacy of Auschwitz, 75 years after liberation

The CBC’s Susan Bonner reports from Auschwitz as the world marks 75 years since the liberation of the Nazi death camp, and author Andrea Pitzer discusses the history of concentration camps, both before and after Hitler.

Download Legacy of Auschwitz, 75 years after liberation
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:34]


Death of Kobe Bryant

Globe and Mail journalist Cathal Kelly talks about the tragic death and legacy of basketball giant Kobe Bryant.

Download Death of Kobe Bryant
[mp3 file: runs 00:08:30]


Efforts to contain coronavirus

A second presumptive case of coronavirus has been confirmed in Ontario. Dr. Allison McGeer of Mount Sinai Hospital and Dr. Eileen de Villa, medical officer of health for the City of Toronto, discuss what is being done to contain the outbreak from spreading. Plus, retired paramedic supervisor Bruce England contracted SARS in Toronto during the outbreak in 2003, and says he never fully recovered from the virus.

Download Efforts to contain coronavirus
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:23]


Auschwitz survivor Edith Grosman

Edith Grosman believes she survived Auschwitz to tell the stories of the horror she saw there. “We had to be messengers. Somebody had to survive ... and tell the story,” she tells The Current’s Matt Galloway.

Download Auschwitz survivor Edith Grosman
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:41]


China's mass quarantines

China is employing mass quarantines and building a brand new hospital — in just days — to deal with the coronavirus outbreak. Is it the right approach?

Download China's mass quarantines
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:00]


Hip Hop Ambassador Toni Blackman

The U.S. State Dept has appointed Toni Blackman as its first Hip Hop Ambassador — using music as the medium for global diplomacy. She’s featured in Mark Katz’s new book; they join us to discuss their work.

Download Hip Hop Ambassador Toni Blackman
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:09]


Fifth Estate investigation into death of Preston Lochead

We talk to The Fifth Estate’s Mark Kelley about his investigation into the death of Alberta man Preston Lochead, and questions that arose about his autopsy.

Download Fifth Estate investigation into death of Preston Lochead
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:49]


The Current Weekly: John Mighton on math; a new approach to fighting cancer; Clearview A.I., Gus from Fogo Island

Canadian mathematician John Mighton believes anyone can become good at math, and that if we understood numbers better, we could solve big problems in the world. Oncologist and author Azra Raza thinks our approach to fighting cancer is putting money in the wrong places — and she's got another way; the unmasking of a shadowy facial recognition software is raising concerns about the end of anonymity; and one of our favourite guests of the week, Gus Penton of Fogo Island, Newfoundland, tells us how he and his neighbours fared during #Snowmageddon.

Download The Current Weekly: John Mighton on math; a new approach to fighting cancer; Clearview A.I., Gus from Fogo Island
[mp3 file: runs 00:35:29]


The rise and rise of TikTok

How the TikTok app from China became the most addictive — and potentially lucrative — social media platform.

Download The rise and rise of TikTok
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:34]


Azra Raza on how we're failing cancer patients

Leading oncologist Azra Raza says despite all the money spent and progress made, the way we treat cancer today is an “embarrassment.” Her new book, The First Cell: And the Human Costs of Pursuing Cancer to the Last, argues we need to change the way we approach the devastating disease.

Download Azra Raza on how we're failing cancer patients
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:20]


Alleged Saudi Arabian phone hack of Jeff Bezos

We discuss the alleged Saudi Arabian phone hack of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, asking what the Kingdom could have had to gain.

Download Alleged Saudi Arabian phone hack of Jeff Bezos
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:04]


National affairs panel

Our national affairs panel takes stock as MPs prepare to head back to the House next week, and the Conservative leadership election begins to gather pace.

Download National affairs panel
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:47]


Open-concept offices

Open-concept offices: do you like them? Or do they make you want to hide in the stationery cupboard? Two experts give us tips on how to make the space work for you, in the latest in our problem-solving series, The Fix.

Download Open-concept offices
[mp3 file: runs 00:22:07]


Union Station’s 90-year-old interlocking system

Thousands of passengers stream through Toronto’s Union Station every day, but most don’t realize their trains are directed by 90-year-old interlocking system of levers and wires. There’s plans to modernize, so before that happens, we went to see it in action.

Download Union Station’s 90-year-old interlocking system
[mp3 file: runs 00:05:08]


Newfoundland stores reopen

Newfoundland's state of emergency was lifted Monday so shops could open their doors for the first time since Friday. And after a few days, people had to face some very long line-ups to pick up the essentials. We talk to some patient shoppers.

Download Newfoundland stores reopen
[mp3 file: runs 00:03:09]


Private jets and climate change

We take flight in the luxurious world of private jets, and ask if the realities of climate change are bringing celebrities and the super rich back to Earth.

Download Private jets and climate change
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:08]


Clearview AI’s facial recognition technology

Clearview AI’s facial recognition technology lets you upload a picture of someone’s face, and find other images of them online, leading to their name or home address. New York Times reporter Kashmir Hill says it could be “the end of public anonymity.”

Download Clearview AI’s facial recognition technology
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:01]


John Mighton on math

Canadian mathematician John Mighton says anyone can be good with numbers — and if we got over our fear of it, we could build a better world.

Download John Mighton on math
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:53]


Coronavirus outbreak

The death toll from a coronavirus outbreak in China has risen to 6, should Canadians be concerned?

Download Coronavirus outbreak
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:56]


Should Canada trust Huawei to build our 5G network?

We ask why Canada should trust Huawei to build our 5G network, the next big step in our internet infrastructure. Alykhan Velshi, vice president of corporate affairs for Huawei Canada, says there’s nothing to worry about, but China expert Margaret McCuaig-Johnston isn’t so sure.

Download Should Canada trust Huawei to build our 5G network?
[mp3 file: runs 00:31:24]


Newfoundland’s #Snowmaggedon

We talk to Newfoundlanders dealing with the aftermath of #Snowmaggedon2020, where about 90 cm of snow has fallen since Friday.

Download Newfoundland’s #Snowmaggedon
[mp3 file: runs 00:17:00]


Meng Wanzhou and the two Michaels

We discuss the extradition hearing for Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou that starts Monday in Vancouver, as two Canadians remain in a Chinese prison under harsh conditions.

Download Meng Wanzhou and the two Michaels
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:03]


Australia climate protests

In Australia, thousands of activists have taken to the streets, saying their government is doing too little to fight climate change and to stop the bushfires that continue to ravage the country.

Download Australia climate protests
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:08]


Joel Stein's case for elitism

The author and journalist Joel Stein makes the (hilarious) case for elitism in his latest book, In Defense of Elitism: Why I'm Better Than You and You are Better Than Someone Who Didn't Buy This Book.

Download Joel Stein's case for elitism
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:14]


The uphill battle facing women in politics

Events this week in the U.S. Democratic race — including questions about Elizabeth Warren's so-called "electability" — are highlighting the issues women in politics face, including in Canada.

Download The uphill battle facing women in politics
[mp3 file: runs 00:13:46]


Neo-Nazi arrests

Yesterday, American authorities arrested three suspected neo-Nazis, including Canadian former army reservist Patrik Matthews. We speak to investigative journalist Jared Holt about why he thinks these arrests are significant.

Download Neo-Nazi arrests
[mp3 file: runs 00:10:31]


The Current Weekly: Switched at birth; Peggy Orenstein on boys & sex; getting plastic out of the ocean

The incredible and harrowing story of Craig Avery and Clarence Hynes, two men who believe they were switched at birth; author and journalist Peggy Orenstein says you should talk to your sons about sex the way you would about table manners — often; and we meet a former sea urchin diver in Newfoundland who has used his talents to haul 20,000 lbs of garbage out of the ocean.

Download The Current Weekly: Switched at birth; Peggy Orenstein on boys & sex; getting plastic out of the ocean
[mp3 file: runs 00:34:30]


Relocating threatened koalas to New Zealand

Ecologist Dr. Andrea Byrom weighs in on a petition to save koalas from Australia’s bushfires, by relocating them to New Zealand.

Download Relocating threatened koalas to New Zealand
[mp3 file: runs 00:11:04]


Leslie Jamison on obsession

Author Leslie Jamison discusses obsession, the promise and limits of empathy, and what sobriety has brought to her writing

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[mp3 file: runs 00:26:21]


Syrian refugee Tareq Hadhad becomes Canadian citizen

Peace by Chocolate CEO Tareq Hadhad tells us how it feels to become a Canadian citizen, four years after he came here as a Syrian refugee.

Download Syrian refugee Tareq Hadhad becomes Canadian citizen
[mp3 file: runs 00:11:20]


Medical Assistance in Dying law under review

We discuss the government’s review of Canada’s Medical Assistance in Dying law, and the very personal stakes wrapped up in the legislation.

Download Medical Assistance in Dying law under review
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:29]


Do cheaters ever prosper?

Winners never cheat, and cheaters never win. Unless they’re the World Series-winning Houston Astros. We’re asking sports writer Michael Baumann and author Julie Fenster about the scandal engulfing the team, and the history of cheating in North America.

Download Do cheaters ever prosper?
[mp3 file: runs 00:17:28]


Suing Iran over downing of flight PS752

Following Iran’s shooting down of flight PS752, what options do the victims’ families have to pursue compensation? Canadian lawyer Michael Arnold says their best hope may be to sue the country directly.

Download Suing Iran over downing of flight PS752
[mp3 file: runs 00:07:10]


National affairs panel: Investigating Iran’s downing of flight PS752

Our national affairs panel discuss how the government is handling the investigation into Iran’s shooting down of flight PS752.

Download National affairs panel: Investigating Iran’s downing of flight PS752
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:03]


Switched at birth

We listen to the incredible story of Clarence Hynes and Craig Avery, two Newfoundland men who believe they were switched at birth in 1962.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:18:37]


Harry and Meghan's move to Canada

Did racist coverage in the British press prompt Megxit? And how will Harry and Meghan adjust to their new lives in Canada? Our panel of royal experts unpack what it all means.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:19:42]


Rise of meth in Canada

CBC reporter Nicole Ireland has investigated the rise of meth in Canada, travelling to northwestern Ontario to look at the impact of the drug. She tells us what she found.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:16:08]


#Oscars(Still)SoWhite

Yesterday’s Oscar nominations posed a familiar problem: a lack of diversity. April Reign joins us to discuss why we’re still talking about #OscarsSoWhite, four years after she coined the hashtag.

Download #Oscars(Still)SoWhite
[mp3 file: runs 00:09:08]


The Fix | Plastic in our oceans

Our new series The Fix looks at people solving the problems in our world today, starting with the harmful plastic in our oceans. We talk to Newfoundland diver Shawn Bath, who has pulled 20,000 lbs of trash from the sea, and ask ecology expert Chelsea Rochman what more can be done.

Download The Fix | Plastic in our oceans
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:48]


Minister Marco Mendicino on Flight PS752

How should the government respond to the deaths of dozens of Canadians in the flight shot down outside Tehran? Payam Akhavan and Roland Paris discuss Ottawa’s diplomatic relations with the U.S. and Iran, and we ask federal minister Marco Mendicino what the government will do to seek justice for the victims and their families.

Download Minister Marco Mendicino on Flight PS752
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:20]


Daniel Levitin on how to age well

Neuroscientist Daniel Levitin gives us his tips on how to age well, and why he thinks old age is a stage of life where we can still grow.

Download Daniel Levitin on how to age well
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:38]


10 years after the Haiti earthquake

We revisit the earthquake that hit Haiti 10 years ago, talking to a doctor who rushed to help, and a Quebec politician who lost four members of her family in the disaster.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:24:23]


The Current Weekly bonus episode: Thunder Bay's opioid crisis

Most of what you hear about Canada's opioid epidemic tends to come from big cities. But Thunder Bay — with just over 100,000 residents, has the highest rate of opioid-related deaths per capita in Ontario. So Matt headed up there to hear from people about how the crisis is impacting their city, and what they're doing about it.

Download The Current Weekly bonus episode: Thunder Bay's opioid crisis
[mp3 file: runs 00:57:36]


Australian bushfires devastate wildlife

We look at the devastating effect bushfires are having on wildlife in Australia, where millions of animals have been killed or displaced.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:24:10]


Rick Mercer remembers John Crosbie, who has died at 88

Firebrand politician John Crosbie has died at 88. Rick Mercer remembers the man who played a dominant role in his beloved Newfoundland and Labrador for decades.

Download Rick Mercer remembers John Crosbie, who has died at 88
[mp3 file: runs 00:02:47]


Peggy Orenstein’s new book Boys & Sex

Peggy Orenstein’s new book looks at the way young boys understand and deal with the topic of sex, and what parents can do to help them develop a healthy attitude.

Download Peggy Orenstein’s new book Boys & Sex
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:21]


Finding answers about the Iran plane crash

Grieving families and friends have questions about the deaths of their loved ones in this week’s plane crash in Iran — what it will take to get to the answers?

Download Finding answers about the Iran plane crash
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:27]


The politics of investigating the Iranian plane crash

We explore how the politics around the region could affect the investigation into the crash, including Canada’s lack of an embassy in Tehran.

Download The politics of investigating the Iranian plane crash
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:06]


The Current Weekly: A Ukrainian plane crash, a Canadian tragedy

This week we're focusing on a Canadian tragedy: Ukraine International Airlines flight 752, which crashed outside Tehran moments after takeoff. We speak to some of the Iranian Canadians across the country who lost loved ones, and ask whether having diplomatic relations with Iran would make getting answers easier today. Also stay tuned for a special bonus episode of The Current Weekly, dropping Saturday.

Download The Current Weekly: A Ukrainian plane crash, a Canadian tragedy
[mp3 file: runs 00:18:41]


Health Minister Patty Hajdu on the opioid crisis

We talk to Health Minister Patty Hajdu about the opioid crisis across the country, and what needs to be done about it.

Download Health Minister Patty Hajdu on the opioid crisis
[mp3 file: runs 00:21:11]


Remembering those we’ve lost in the Iranian plane crash

We speak to Iranian-Canadians mourning the loss of their friends and loved, following the plane crash outside Tehran that claimed 63 Canadian lives.

Download Remembering those we’ve lost in the Iranian plane crash
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:03]


The first responders in Thunder Bay's opioid crisis

On a recent visit to Thunder Bay, Matt Galloway met with people on the front lines of the opioid crisis, from health workers to police officers. Hear their stories in the documentary A Hard Hit.

Download The first responders in Thunder Bay's opioid crisis
[mp3 file: runs 00:31:09]


Special coverage: Plane crash kills 63 Canadians in Iran, as Trump addresses U.S. tensions with country

Matt Galloway hosts a network special on two developing stories: Iran's retaliatory attack on Iraqi military bases housing U.S. troops, and the plane crash outside Tehran that claimed 176 lives, including 63 Canadians.

Download Special coverage: Plane crash kills 63 Canadians in Iran, as Trump addresses U.S. tensions with country
[mp3 file: runs 01:00:11]


VR skin that lets you 'touch' someone from miles away

It’s the latest in virtual reality — a skin that allows you to "touch" someone from hundreds of kilometres away, by tapping on pressure points on an app. Matt Gallowaycbc tried it out recently, and says it’s only slightly creepy.

Download VR skin that lets you 'touch' someone from miles away
[mp3 file: runs 00:18:33]


Iran's retaliation

How will the U.S. react to Iran’s missile attacks on Iraqi military bases housing U.S. troops? We discuss the latest in the rising tensions, and ask whether the retaliation could actually be an opportunity for de-escalation, or even diplomacy.

Download Iran's retaliation
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:12]


Thunder Bay's opioid crisis

We visit Thunder Bay, Ont., where the opioid crisis is extracting a heavy death toll. Those lives cut short have left loved ones reeling, and grieving families searching for answers.

Download Thunder Bay's opioid crisis
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:55]


Philippe Lançon reflects on Charlie Hebdo massacre

Five years ago today, two gunmen burst into the offices of French publication Charlie Hebdo, controversial in part for publishing cartoons about the Muslim prophet Muhammed. Columnist Philippe Lancon was grievously wounded in the attack, but survived. His new book reflects on the horror he witnessed that day, and his road to recovery.

Download Philippe Lançon reflects on Charlie Hebdo massacre
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:04]


Trump threatens Iran's cultural sites

U.S. President Donald Trump has threatened to strike cultural sites in Iran, despite warnings that such an attack would break international law. We discuss which cultural sites are at risk, and what the world would lose, if they're lost.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:23:16]


U.S.-Iran tensions

We discuss what the escalating tensions between the U.S. and Iran means for the Middle East, the U.S., and its allies — including Canada.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:20:31]


Trial of Harvey Weinstein

Our new host Matt Galloway discusses the trial of Harvey Weinstein — which starts today — and talks to two Canadian women about what’s next for the #MeToo movement.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:19:23]


Ada Calhoun on mid-life crisis facing Gen X women

A few years ago, worries about her career and the future kept Ada Calhoun awake at night, and she wondered if other women were sleepless too. Her new book looks at the mid-life crisis facing Gen X women, and asks why it isn’t taken seriously.

Download Ada Calhoun on mid-life crisis facing Gen X women
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:06]


Australia bushfires

As fires raged in Australia over the holidays, Vanessa Keenan took refuge in a bunker while her family farm burned. Now she’s calling on the country’s government to pay attention to climate change.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:11:35]


Killing of Qassim Soleimani

The U.S. says the killing of top Iranian general Qassim Soleimani in Baghdad was to prevent further attacks on U.S. personnel abroad. But it’s triggered a global alarm about escalating tensions between the two countries. We discuss what happens next.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:20:31]


Mauro Gatti's Happy Broadcast

Mauro Gatti runs The Happy Broadcast, where he illustrates good news from around the world. He tells Laura Lynch he’s not trying to ignore the world’s problems, but make people feel empowered to tackle them, head on.

Download Mauro Gatti's Happy Broadcast
[mp3 file: runs 00:11:53]


How our flawed brains make us creative

We’re talking to neuroscientist Henning Beck about his new book Scatterbrain, and why the shortcomings in our brains are actually what makes us creative.

Download How our flawed brains make us creative
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:30]


La Befana, the Italian Christmas witch

We get a visit from La Befana, the Italian witch who brings children gifts on January 5th. Plus, a little thank-you message from Laura.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:06:15]


Dr. Lenore Newman on food extinction

'Ansault' pears so creamy you could spread them like jam, mammoth stew, and dishes of the Roman empire seasoned with the long-lost herb silphium. These are some of the extinct foods that culinary geographer Lenore Newman looks at in her new book, Lost Feast: Culinary Extinction And The Future of Food. She speaks to us about why humans are so good at loving foods to death, which of our favourite foods are in danger of disappearing now, and what we can do about it.

Download Dr. Lenore Newman on food extinction
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:55]


Forced labour in China's Uighur camps

How can you tell if the clothes in your closet were made using forced labour, possibly from the million ethnic Uighurs detained in camps in China? We talk to two experts who say material from forced labour is supplying western markets, and ask what can be done about it.

Download Forced labour in China's Uighur camps
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:57]


Australia bushfires

We talk to a retired police officer in Australia who says the latest bushfires have devastated his community in Mallacoota, where thousands took refuge on beaches as the fires raged.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:19:47]


What are Trump's chances in 2020? Pundits say it's hard to predict

We look ahead to the 2020 U.S. presidential campaign, as Donald Trump becomes the first president to rerun for office under impeachment.

Download What are Trump's chances in 2020? Pundits say it's hard to predict
[mp3 file: runs 00:26:52]


Rumana Monzur: Untying the Knot

In a conversation first aired in November, Bangladeshi-Canadian woman Rumana Monzur tells us how she rebuilt her life after a vicious attack from her husband blinded her. She says she found hope, and the will to keep going, for the sake of her daughter.

Download Rumana Monzur: Untying the Knot
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:22]


A lighter look at the year that was

Let's just say it: it's been a strange year. We've convened our annual panel of satirists for a lighter look at the big events of 2019.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:24:09]


David Byrne on why we all need reasons to be cheerful

We're finishing the year on a positive note, with a replay of our interview from this fall with former Talking Heads frontman David Byrne, on his latest project, a website called Reasons to be Cheerful.

Download David Byrne on why we all need reasons to be cheerful
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:42]


How Sesame Street reflected Canada to itself

Sesame Street turned 50 years old this year. In November, we spoke to University of Guelph history professor Matthew Hayday about the special role the beloved show has played in Canadian history.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:07:05]


A rash of anti-Semitic violence in New York

After a rash of anti-Semitic attacks in New York, we look at what can be done to stop the problem, and how the violence is impacting Jewish communities around the world, including here in Canada.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:20:27]


The journalists who helped bring down Harvey Weinstein on their new book

The dogged work of New York Times journalists Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey helped break open the Harvey Weinstein scandal and launch the #MeToo movement. In an interview from September, the two women discuss their investigation, and the network of people who worked to keep the story buried.

Download The journalists who helped bring down Harvey Weinstein on their new book
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:50]


Why Margaret Atwood waited more than 30 years to write The Testaments

Margaret Atwood had notes about a sequel to The Handmaid's Tale that date back to the early 1990s, but didn't notify her publishers until 2017. For those intervening decades, she wrestled with the idea. In September, she spoke to Laura Lynch about her novel The Testaments.

Download Why Margaret Atwood waited more than 30 years to write The Testaments
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:43]


The biggest stories of 2019

Our national affairs panel looks at the biggest Canadian political stories of 2019, and what to watch for in 2020.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:20:14]


A Toronto-born son of Russian spies becomes a Canadian

Alexander Vavilov, the Toronto-born son of Russian spies, was officially made a Canadian citizen last week after a Supreme Court of Canada decision. He tells us how he's feeling after decision he's awaited for years.

Download A Toronto-born son of Russian spies becomes a Canadian
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:42]


The legacy of the Berlin Wall, 30 years after it fell

Nov 7, 2019 marked 30 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall. But for many who grew up in its shadow, the barriers remain. Our documentary, The Wall in the Head, speaks to two East Berliners about the night it fell, and the decades since. This is a replay of the documentary, which first aired in November.

Download The legacy of the Berlin Wall, 30 years after it fell
[mp3 file: runs 00:27:34]


A "father of the internet" on the digital world in 2030

Vint Cerf, known as one of the "fathers of the internet" and now Google's Chief Internet Evangelist, tells us his predictions for what the digital world will look like in 2030.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:20:25]


The ethics of editing human genes

Human genome editing could eliminate certain diseases and even turn your children into star athletes — if you can afford it. Françoise Baylis joins us to discuss the ethics of CRISPR, and the risks it could become the reserve of a tiny elite.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:25:12]


Amazon’s influence and future

As we head into a new decade we look at the influence Amazon wields in our society and look ahead to the next 10 which may come with its share of obstacles.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:23:49]


T'was the nightshift before Christmas

Comedian and former doctor Adam Kay tells us about his new book, T'was the Nighshift Before Christmas, a collection of hilarious and horrifying holiday medical stories.

Download T'was the nightshift before Christmas
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:04]


Bill Bryson on the Body

In November, author Bill Bryson told Laura Lynch about the incredible and hilarious facts he learned about the human body while researching his latest book, The Body: A Guide for Occupants — including how much it would cost to build your very own Benedict Cumberbatch.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:22:23]


Becoming Santa: Ottawa man carries on legacy of vintage red suit

When Michael Morin inherited a vintage Santa suit from a friend who died, he realized he needed to take on the role himself. This is a replay of our 2017 documentary, Becoming Santa.

Download Becoming Santa: Ottawa man carries on legacy of vintage red suit
[mp3 file: runs 00:19:23]


Italian espresso's push for UNESCO recognition

Earlier this month in Rome, a group of usually clashing MPs put their differences aside for an issue that bridges all divides in Italy: espresso coffee. They want it to be considered for UNESCO world heritage status. Megan Williams tells us about the rich traditions behind this dark, bitter liquid.

Download Italian espresso's push for UNESCO recognition
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:01]


How the internet is causing English to evolve — and creating intergenerational confusion

The internet has changed the way we speak and write to each, with emojis and acronyms like LOL now commonplace — but often causing confusion between the generations. Author Gretchen McCulloch argues that's not necessarily a bad thing. Earlier this year she joined Laura Lynch to discuss her book Because Internet: Understanding The New Rules of Language.

Download How the internet is causing English to evolve — and creating intergenerational confusion
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:56]


ER shortages in Nova Scotia

We take a look at the toll of skyrocketing emergency room closures in Nova Scotia, especially in small rural communities.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:20:18]


Youth vaping

New rules will try to curb youth vaping by restricting the kind of advertising companies can do, but does that go far enough in fighting the problems associated with our young people vaping? We ask Dr. Andrew Pipe.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:10:37]


Could roadkill be the most ethical way to eat meat?

Roadkill was legalized for human consumption in California earlier this year — we talk to some people who argue that it's the ultimate in organic, ethical meat.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:21:55]


Why this couple puts up dozens of Christmas trees

Red Deer couple Vince Jackman and Tom Kereluk have 120 Christmas trees in their home — including a basement "where Christmas threw up."

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[mp3 file: runs 00:04:52]


Daisy Ridley's Rey inspired a new generation of female Star Wars fans, says cosplayer

As the new Star Wars hits theatres, we’re talking to some superfans — including cosplayers and a family that made a gingerbread Death Star — about why the series endures, and how it's adapted to changing times.

Download Daisy Ridley's Rey inspired a new generation of female Star Wars fans, says cosplayer
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:55]


Australia bushfires

Bushfires continue to rage in Australia, where the country’s leaders are facing criticism for inaction on the climate change said to be contributing to the disaster. Blue Mountains Mayor Mark Greenhill says patience is running out.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:07:56]


The Current Weekly: India's citizenship law; Our changing relationship with the phone; Boeing halts 737 Max production

We check in on the fallout of a new law in India that fast-tracks citizenship for migrants, unless they're Muslim; how scammers, texting and the demise of landlines are changing our relationship to the phone — and maybe to our loved ones; a Toronto man who lost his whole family in the Ethiopian Airlines crash talks about the news that Boeing will halt production of 737 Max jetliners.

Download The Current Weekly: India's citizenship law; Our changing relationship with the phone; Boeing halts 737 Max production
[mp3 file: runs 00:30:27]


Ronan Farrow

In our October interview with Ronan Farrow, the journalist alleged that his former employer, NBC, killed his reporting on assault allegations against Harvey Weinstein because one of their own star hosts, Matt Lauer, was facing accusations of sexual harassment.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:24:26]


Henrietta Lovell on tea

Henrietta Lovell is known as the Tea Lady — and she’s on a mission to lead you away from mass-produced tea bags and start "a small revolution where people could perhaps appreciate the purest, most beautiful teas."

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[mp3 file: runs 00:16:35]


Trump’s impeachment

President Trump is the third U.S. commander-in-chief to be impeached — but will it make a difference to his supporters? We talk to a man who voted for Trump in 2016, and has a decision to make in 2020.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:07:38]


LifeLabs data breach

About 15 million people in B.C. and Ontario may have been affected by a data breach at LifeLabs, including phone numbers and medical tests. But do Canadians take cyber security threats seriously?

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[mp3 file: runs 00:18:25]


Boeing suspends production of 737 Max 8s

A father who lost his family in the second Boeing 737 Max 8 crash tells us how he is coping nine months after his loss, and how he feels about the company’s decision to suspend production of the planes.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:11:58]


‘Portholes to another world’: Cave diver Jill Heinerth on what draws her to the depths, even when faced with fear of death

Cave diver Jill Heinerth reached the top of her field by exploring the depths of the Earth. In an interview first broadcast in Sept. 2019, she told us about fighting for her place in male-dominated field, mastering her fear, and her closest calls.

Download ‘Portholes to another world’: Cave diver Jill Heinerth on what draws her to the depths, even when faced with fear of death
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:28]


The demise of the landline

Do you still have a landline at home? Many people don’t, and writer Julia Cho says its demise is having an impact on family dynamics.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:09:32]


Impeachment vote

We discuss the impeachment vote facing U.S. President Donald Trump Wednesday afternoon: how we got here, and what happens next.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:19:50]


UN climate summit

Activists say this year’s UN climate summit has ended with little progress. We ask what’s next, and what’s at stake if bolder action isn’t taken.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:23:52]


Former Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin

Former Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin discusses her remarkable life in law — and that time she wanted to name her dog after a certain former prime minister.

Download Former Chief Justice Beverley McLachlin
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:29]


India citizenship law

Protesters in India say a new citizenship law there discriminates against the country's Muslim population — we discuss the anger, and the violence that has followed.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:20:24]


Spam calls: What can be done to stop them?

Is Canada in a spam call crisis? Why are we getting so many scam calls — and why can’t be stop them? We talk to Sarah Hagi, a writer who says she’s stopped picking up over incessant nuisance calls; CRTC chairperson Ian Scott about how big the problem has gotten; and “The Phone Lady” Mary Jane Copps, who can teach you how to use the phone well.

Download Spam calls: What can be done to stop them?
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:05]


Why this author made a personal, 4-point plan to fight climate change (and you can too)

Author Jonathan Safran Foer has written a book about how the food we eat could be a part of the fight against climate change.

Download Why this author made a personal, 4-point plan to fight climate change (and you can too)
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:06]


National affairs panel on Andrew Scheer's resignation

Our national affairs panel looks at how Andrew Scheer's resignation as Conservative leader will change the dynamics in federal politics.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:20:20]


Andrew Scheer's resignation

We discuss what Andrew Scheer’s resignation means for the future of the Conservative Party of Canada.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:20:24]


Baltimore Museum and women artists

The Baltimore Museum of Art has announced that it will only buy and display art made by women in 2020. We look at the gender divide that still exists in the art world, and ask what more needs to be done to address it.

Download Baltimore Museum and women artists
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:43]


Are Christmas carols actually… awful?

Planning to throw on a Christmas carol playlist at your holiday party this year? Don’t, says comedian John Cullen.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:03:38]


U.K. election results

Boris Johnson won a strong majority Thursday, in an election consumed by Brexit. What do the results mean for the U.K., and its departure from the E.U.?

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[mp3 file: runs 00:21:10]


The Current Weekly: The Afghanistan Papers; Dolly Parton; Converting golf courses to housing; Dumpster diving perfectly good products

We get the view from Afghanistan on a trove of documents that reveal that top U.S. officials always knew the war there was doomed; a new podcast sheds light on why Dolly Parton is a unifying force in divided times; growing calls in Canada and the U.S. to turn public golf courses into parks and houses; and we dive deep into where your shopping returns end up...and by deep dive, we mean dumpster dive.

Download The Current Weekly: The Afghanistan Papers; Dolly Parton; Converting golf courses to housing; Dumpster diving perfectly good products
[mp3 file: runs 00:40:45]


Robert Harris on his dystopian novel Second Sleep

The U.K. goes to the polls today, with an uncertain outcome fuelling fears of more Brexit chaos. These uncertain times have inspired author Robert Harris’s new book Second Sleep, about a dystopian vision of Britain.

Download Robert Harris on his dystopian novel Second Sleep
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:44]


Is it time for a 4-day work week?

Could the four-day work week be coming to Canada? U.K. Labour politicians made it an election pledge, and a trial at Microsoft Japan showed success. We look at the pros and cons of a four-day week — and a three-day weekend.

Download Is it time for a 4-day work week?
[mp3 file: runs 00:14:54]


Dumpster diving for perfectly good products

Every day, perfectly good products end up in dumpsters, from unopened shampoo to unworn clothes. Why? The Current went dumpster diving with a seasoned scavenger to find out.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:12:00]


Alberta fight over climate change lesson

After a lesson on climate change angered parents in Alberta — and led to the cancellation of a school dance — we look at controversy in the classroom, and accusations that studies are being politicized.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:20:15]


NAFTA 2.0

Our national affairs panel unboxes NAFTA 2.0, and discusses the economic challenges still facing Ottawa.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:20:11]


Andrew Rader on exploration

Canadian scientist and SpaceX mission manager Andrew Rader discusses his new book on exploration, and how our curiosity about the unknown has shaped our history, and will shape our future.

Download Andrew Rader on exploration
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:30]


The Afghanistan Papers

We discuss the Afghanistan Papers, a vast trove of documents that shows the war effort against the Taliban was doomed from the beginning — and top US officials knew it.

Download The Afghanistan Papers
[mp3 file: runs 00:24:15]


New Zealand eruption

Canadian Sylvain Plasse thought he was lucky to see the eruption in New Zealand from a distance, until he realized others were caught up in it, including tourists he thinks he met on his cruise.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:20:12]


Electric planes and carbon capture technology

We look at efforts to make flying more sustainable, from electric planes to carbon-capture technology that makes fuel out of thin air.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:18:50]


Russia-Ukraine ceasefire

We take a closer look at the Russia-Ukraine ceasefire in a conflict that claimed 13,000 lives, and the complicated geopolitics behind it.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:26:18]


Converting golf courses to housing

Cities across Canada are grappling with housing shortages — and part of the problem is that no one is making new land. Could publicly owned golf courses be used to build homes?

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[mp3 file: runs 00:19:22]


Prince Liam of Sealand

Wondering what to get that friend who has everything this Christmas? Why not make them a Lord or Lady of Sealand! Prince Liam of Sealand tells us about the history of his principality — created when his grandfather wanted to start a pirate radio station — and how you too can join its noble ranks.

Download Prince Liam of Sealand
[mp3 file: runs 00:08:08]


Measles outbreak in Samoa

Samoa is dealing with a deadly measles outbreak, but it’s not the only country struggling. Why does this completely preventable disease seem to be surging around the world?

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[mp3 file: runs 00:22:28]


From London to Hartlepool

The U.K. heads back to the polls this week for the third time since 2015. CBC’s senior Europe correspondent, Margaret Evans, spoke with voters in London and Hartlepool about the Dec.12 election and the ongoing Brexit upheaval.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:18:49]


Fusion GPS: Trump, Russia and the 2020 election

Peter Fritsch and Glenn Simpson investigated alleged links between Russia and Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign, and commissioned the Steele Dossier. They say in 2020, democracy itself is at risk.

Download Fusion GPS: Trump, Russia and the 2020 election
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:04]


Dolly Parton's America

A new podcast about Dolly Parton describes her world as a place where church ladies, lesbians, drag queens and cowboys all come together — but why does her music mean so much to so many? Host and creator Jad Abumrad explains the unifying force of Dolly Parton's America.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:23:39]


Montreal Massacre, 30 years on

Survivor Nathalie Provost didn't see herself as feminist at the time of the Montreal Massacre 30 years ago, and received criticism for saying as much to the attacker at École Polytechnique. But she welcomes a new memorial sign that recognizes the killings as anti feminist.

Download Montreal Massacre, 30 years on
[mp3 file: runs 00:20:25]


The Current Weekly: École Polytechnique; Canada-China prisoner swap?; "altering" memories of heartbreak; change for women in Sudan; the sounds of coral

A survivor of the École Polytechnique massacre on why it matters to call the attack "antifemnist"; former deputy prime minister John Manley makes the case for a prisoner swap with China; research finds it may be possible to alter memories of heartbreak so they hurt less; Sudanese activist Fadia Khalaf on the country’s repeal of laws restricting women’s freedom; how sound can save a coral reef.

Download The Current Weekly: École Polytechnique; Canada-China prisoner swap?; "altering" memories of heartbreak; change for women in Sudan; the sounds of coral
[mp3 file: runs 00:40:55]


Canada’s new Minister of Environment and Climate Change Jonathan Wilkinson

As the UN Climate Change Conference kicks off in Madrid this week, we speak to Canada’s new Minister of Environment and Climate Change Jonathan Wilkinson, about balancing the country’s economic needs with the fight against climate change.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:19:33]


Shingles

What vaccines are there against shingles, and who can take them? Are they costly, and are they covered? We take a look at the virus — and what you can do to avoid it.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:17:28]


Are we losing the night sky?

How we see the night sky is in danger from a new form of light pollution — lots and lots of satellites! While they’re vital for our GPS and mobile internet, Ethan Siegel warns it could hinder our study of the universe

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[mp3 file: runs 00:17:57]


The 43rd Canadian parliament begins

The next parliament kicks off today when the throne speech is delivered in Ottawa. CBC's National Affairs Editor Chris Hall tells us what to expect.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:07:15]


How sound can save a coral reef

Scientists have discovered that coral reefs have a distinct sound — and it's quite different if the reefs are healthy, or dying. But by playing the sound of a healthy reef underwater, Tim Gordon says at-risk reefs can be saved. He tells us more.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:06:55]


Tension at NATO summit

Things are tense at the NATO summit, highlighting the pressures on the 70-year-old alliance within its own ranks — and from rivals like Russia and China. Professor Margaret MacMillan tells us where these issues come from, and what's at stake for Canada.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:20:11]


Campobello mail checks

Due to a geographical quirk, mail from the Canadian mainland to the Canadian island of Campobello must go through the U.S., where it has been undergoing checks. Some residents aren't happy.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:06:01]


Is a Canada-China prisoner swap a good idea?

Should Canada exchange Huawei exec Meng Wanzhou for Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, the Canadians detained in China? A year after Meng's arrest, we talk to former deputy prime minister John Manley and Stephanie Carvin about what progress has been made.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:18:28]


Abby Stein went from being an ultra-Orthodox rabbi to a transgender activist. Her new book tells her story

Abby Stein lived as an ultra-Orthodox Hasidic Jew for most of her life, but says she always questioned the conventions of the faith. She left the community in 2012, and came out as transgender a few years later.

Download Abby Stein went from being an ultra-Orthodox rabbi to a transgender activist. Her new book tells her story
[mp3 file: runs 00:25:09]


Mini nuclear plants

Three Canadian provinces are betting big on small modular reactors — or mini nuclear plants. But while some say Canada could reap the benefits and use the plants to fight climate change, others warn that they have the same safety and cost problems as other plants. We hear both sides of the debate.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:18:45]


Agent Jack, the spy who hunted Nazi sympathizers in wartime London

As the war raged in Europe, MI5 agents waged secret battles in London, rooting out Britons who wanted to help the Nazis invade. Writer Robert Hutton tells us about the life of one of those spies, Eric Roberts — or Agent Jack — who settled in Canada after the war.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:27:29]


National Affairs Panel: Provincial premiers make their demands

Canada's provincial premiers have issued several demands for Justin Trudeau, perhaps emboldened by the prime minister’s lack of a majority government. Are they starting to sound like the official opposition? Our national affairs panel discusses the latest in Canadian politics.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:20:25]


Robert Bilott’s legal battle with Dupont

Lawyer Robert Bilott tells us about his decades-long battle with Dupont, over the alleged effects of a toxic chemical used in the production of Teflon.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:24:29]


The research — and the ethics — of memory editing

If you could take a pill to make a bad memory hurt less, would you? We talk to Alain Brunet about his cutting-edge research into making that possible, and Judy Illes about the ethics of doing it.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:18:07]


Sudanese activist Fadia Khalaf on why the fight’s not over

We speak to a Sudanese activist Fadia Khalaf about the country’s repeal of laws restricting women’s freedom — and why she says the fight’s not over.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:09:22]


Is vaping creating a public health crisis?

Vaping was billed as a way to help smokers cut back, but instead ti seems it's introduced a new generation to nicotine. David Hammond and Dr Andrew Pipe weigh in on whether its creating a public health crisis.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:19:55]


Black Friday and the environment

Is it time to ban Black Friday? Some lawmakers in France are trying to, on the grounds it’s a waste of resources and causes over-consumption. We discuss whether all those cheap deals have a high cost for the environment.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:20:23]


Holiday films we love (and love to hate)

The holiday season is almost upon us, and so are all those classic films we watch at this time of year. From Miracle on 34th Street, to Love Actually, to Die Hard (don’t @ me), film critic Di Golding is here to discuss the ones we love, and the ones we love to hate.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:13:15]


Corinne Vella

Two years after a car bomb killed Maltese journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia, the investigation into her murder is implicating some of the most senior officials in Malta's government. We're speaking to her sister, Corinne Vella.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:10:40]


Women in prison

Do we need an alternative to prison for women? Filmmaker Nance Ackerman's new documentary looks at women behind bars, and puts the cameras in the hands of prisoners themselves. She joins us — along with a former inmate, and a former guard — to discuss.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:23:18]


The Current Weekly: Susan Rice on Benghazi; the healing power of soup; 1st female lobster crew; China's Uighur detention centres

Former top Obama aide Susan Rice reflects on the Benghazi attacks, Huawei, and Barbara Frum; Scientists study the health benefits of soup; Nova Scotia was its first all-female lobster crew; and a Canadian Uighur worries about his family in China, who he hasn't spoken to in years

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[mp3 file: runs 00:40:28]


Racism and abuse in hockey

Calgary Flames coach Bill Peters faces allegations he used racial slurs against players, in a scandal rocking the NHL. As players speak out, we talk to three people close to hockey in Canada, who take us inside the locker room.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:20:45]


Calling the Butterball turkey hotline

As the U.S. celebrates their Thanksgiving, we place a call with the Butterball Turkey talk-line, where operators are standing by to help with all your bird-related questions (and disasters).

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[mp3 file: runs 00:05:27]


Documentary '19 and homeless' follows kids as they age out of foster system

At 19, kids living in foster care in B.C. age out of the system — and many end up on the streets. A new documentary follows these young people as they deal with homelessness, mental health issues and addiction.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:22:38]


Nir Eyal on how to overcome digital distractions and find your focus

When did you last read a book, without checking your phone every few pages? Or watched TV, without tweeting about it? If you feel distracted, author Nir Eyal says don’t blame the tech. We can focus, we can function, and he’s here to tell us how.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:24:06]


National affairs panel on Freeland's western tour and Scheer’s leadership

Our national affairs panellists on Chrystia Freeland's western tour, and questions about Andrew Scheer's leadership of the Conservative Party.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:20:17]


HIV activist Ruth Awori

As a child, Ruth Awori took medication every day, even though she didn’t feel sick. One day she refused until her mother told her the truth: Awori had been HIV positive since birth. Now, she fights the stigma of HIV in Uganda, with Young Generation Alive. She tells Laura Lynch about her work.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:25:01]


Dayna Spiring, the first woman on the Grey Cup

A celebration 29 years in the making, the Winnipeg Blue Bombers took home the Grey Cup this week. It was a double celebration for Dayna Spiring, who became the first woman to have her name engraved on the cup. She tells us what that felt like.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:06:40]


The fight to save .org

The registry of .org web addresses is being sold off to a private equity firm — but there are concerns that could have implications for the non-profits that use the addresses (think Greenpeace or Human Rights Watch). We’re hear from both sides of the debate.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:17:38]


Blasting wine into space — for science

A dozen bottles of red wine were recently launched into space by a private company, for a year-long stint on the International Space Station. We discuss what the experiment hopes to achieve, and ask what are the wider implications as more businesses take an interest in space exploration.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:23:55]


Row over Taylor Swift’s back catalogue

Taylor Swift was named Artist of the Decade at the AMAs Sunday, but the controversy over who owns her back catalogue drags on — a rights battle making waves in the court of public opinion.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:09:26]


CN Rail strike resolved

A tentative deal looks set to end a week-long strike of CN Rail workers. Teamsters Canada President François Laporte says the deal ensures safer working conditions, but there is still discussion to be had about improving conditions further.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:13:45]


Challenge to compensation for Indigenous children

The government is challenging a human rights tribunal order that Ottawa compensate First Nations children affected by the on-reserve welfare system.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:20:04]


Gail Atkinson's all-women lobster fishing crew

As lobster season gets underway this week, Gail Atkinson is making history as captain of what's believed to be the very first all-female lobster fishing crew in Nova Scotia.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:10:05]


Ambassador Susan Rice

Ambassador Susan Rice discusses China, Trump, and how the politics of personal destruction took a toll on her own family.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:25:06]


Archdiocese of Vancouver's review of files related to clerical sexual abuse

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Vancouver has completed a review of accusations of sexual abuse dating back to the 1950s, naming some perpetrators and making recommendations to prevent future abuse. We talk to Mary Margaret MacKinnon, who led the review.

Download Archdiocese of Vancouver's review of files related to clerical sexual abuse
[mp3 file: runs 00:14:01]


China Cables

Leaked documents show the mass surveillance and internment of China's Muslim population, with as many as 1 million ethnic Uighurs in detention. CBC's Adrienne Arsenault joins us to discuss what the China Cables reveal.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:19:28]


Author Bryan Walsh on the end of the world

Bryan Walsh's new book End Times: A Brief Guide to the End of the World looks at a pretty grim topic, but he tells Laura Lynch that there is hope to stave off Armageddon if humanity can learn to work together.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:26:49]


The medicinal power of soup

A bowl of hot, nutritious soup is every grandma's prescription when someone has a cold, but now scientists are looking into whether the medicinal properties of soup go beyond being just soothing and delicious. Professor Jake Baum is part of a team suggesting some homemade soups might contain malaria-fighting properties.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:21:22]


The 107th Grey Cup

Canadian football fans are getting ready for the 107th Grey Cup in Calgary, where the Hamilton Tiger Cats face the Winnipeg Blue Bombers on Sunday. The CBC's Lisa Robinson met with some fans to find the celebration already in full swing.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:03:08]


Amnesty says tech giants are abusing human rights

A new report from Amnesty International looks at how tech giants collect and monetize our personal data online — and calls the practice not just intrusive, but an "unprecedented" abuse of human rights. We speak to Joe Westby, the report's lead author, about why Amnesty wants governments to take action.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:08:59]


Minister of Middle Class Prosperity Mona Fortier

What exactly is a Minister of Middle Class Prosperity? We're speaking to Mona Fortier about her new job to find out.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:11:44]


The Current Weekly - Rumana Manzur and "Untying the Knot"; State of Legal Pot 1 year on; Sasquatch; Iran Protests; Wild Skating

New documentary "Untying the Knot" tells Rumana Manzur's story and examines intimate partner abuse; It's been more than a year since pot went legal in Canada, but it's been anything but a smooth ride for some hopeful pot shop owners, especially in Ontario; Exploring the history and mythology of Sasquatches with author John Zada; Iran faces mounting protests over sky-high fuel prices; and the wonders of Wild Skating in Alberta.

Download The Current Weekly - Rumana Manzur and "Untying the Knot"; State of Legal Pot 1 year on; Sasquatch; Iran Protests; Wild Skating
[mp3 file: runs 00:47:13]


Rumana Monzur: Untying the Knot

Bangladeshi-Canadian woman Rumana Monzur tells us how she rebuilt her life after a vicious attack from her husband blinded her. She found hope, and the will to keep going, for the sake of her daughter.

Download Rumana Monzur: Untying the Knot
[mp3 file: runs 00:23:23]


Are impeachment hearings swaying voters?

We’re checking in on the latest in the impeachment hearings with the CBC’s Susan Ormiston, and speaking to two Americans who are watching — but aren't convinced the process will sway their vote.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:20:11]


Women in politics

Valérie Ouellet brings us an update on her investigation into why women are more likely than men to find themselves running in hard-to-win ridings — and what that means for Parliament's gender balance.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:08:13]


Deep-sea mining

Gerard Barron’s company retrieves potato-sized nodules from the ocean floor, jammed full of base metals. He says they could help to wean us off fossil fuels, but oceanographer Craig Smith warns that the risk to sea life could be too high.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:17:01]


Wild skating

Around this time of year in Alberta’s Bow Valley, the lakes are frozen just enough for skating, but not yet covered in snow. We join some locals to try out "wild skating."

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[mp3 file: runs 00:04:31]


National affairs panel on the new cabinet

Our national affairs panel unpacks the prime minister’s options as he prepares to unveil his new cabinet.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:19:12]


Iran protests

We discuss the unrest in Iran, where more than 100 protesters are reported killed, amid an internet blackout.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:21:36]


Superbugs and antibiotic-resistance

Doctor and author Matt McCarthy discusses the rise of antibiotic-resistant bugs, and the work being done to avoid catastrophe.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:24:22]


Hong Kong standoff

After two days of violent clashes, roughly 100 protesters are holed up inside Hong Kong’s Polytechnic University, surrounded by police. We ask how the standoff can be resolved, and if more violence is inevitable.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:19:39]


Prince Andrew and Jeffrey Epstein

A BBC interview with Prince Andrew was supposed to explain his ties to the late convicted sex offender, Jeffrey Epstein, but it’s being called a “car crash,” and has prompted calls for him to step down from public life. Is this another annus horribilis for the Royal Family?

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[mp3 file: runs 00:24:12]


What a meme of a woman yelling at a cat tells us about ourselves

A meme of two incongruous images — a woman screaming and a cat sitting at a dinner table — was one of the most popular pieces of internet humour this summer. Why did it strike a nerve, and what does it tell us about ourselves, and how we handle anger and frustration?

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[mp3 file: runs 00:06:15]


Drone warfare

An expert on peace discusses how drones are reshaping the landscape of war.

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[mp3 file: runs 00:19:40]