Tapestry

 
 

Tapestry

Tapestry explores spirituality, religion and the search for meaning. Find space for your soul every week.

Updated: Fridays
Download episodes from this podcast for: 6 months
Visit Show Site: http://www.cbc.ca/tapestry

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The moral dilemmas of Game of Thrones and online recommendations

Politics and religion in Game of Thrones: Game of Thrones wraps as a secular fantasy epic that questions and subverts the genre's typically dominant theological narratives, argues Robert Joustra, a Canadian political scientist. And, Algorithms and the self: Mike Rugnetta wanted to know what recommendations YouTube would give him if he searched for "How to run a 5K," and the results were... tempting. He tells Tapestry how recommendation algorithms can have an impact on the people we become.

Download The moral dilemmas of Game of Thrones and online recommendations
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Climate and psyche

When it comes to climate change, New York magazine deputy editor David Wallace-Wells, says we are far into panic territory. He tells Tapesty's Mary Hynes why he believes that, despite what should be dread-inducing data, so many of us continue to live in "complacency and denial." People who adhere to scientific data despair when they hear opinions from the climate-sceptic movement. But sociologist Kari Norgaard says climate sceptics are a negligible problem in the face of a much more common form of denial ? what scientists call "implicatory denial." Implicatory denial is when we know about a problem, but divert our attention elsewhere ? the proverbial elephant in the room. Kari Norgaard deconstructs this type of denial of which so many of us are guilty. Crystal Lameman of Beaver Lake Cree First Nation says while many Canadians are just waking up to the frightening realities of climate change her people have been acutely aware of its consequences for decades. She explores what climate change -- and Alberta's oil sands development-- has done to her traditional territory and culture and how her community is fighting back.

Download Climate and psyche
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Jean Vanier reflects on a life devoted to people with disabilities

Jean Vanier, the Canadian who created the L'Arche network of communities for intellectually disabled people, has died. Tapestry revisits a 2005 interview in which Jean Vanier told Mary Hynes about the genesis of his beliefs, the founding of L'Arche and what it brought him.

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What should parents know?

Parents today are facing more pressure and scrutiny than ever before. But Ann Douglas wants to celebrate the fact that parents don't have to be perfect, rather than spread the narrative that parenting is an exercise in misery. Erica Lenti's traditional Italian nonna doesn't know she's gay, and if Lenti has her way, she'll never find out. She said it gives her freedom within her family she might not have otherwise.

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Love In The Lab

Researcher Arthur Aron has some surprising ideas on how to make love work. One romance tip? Increase your likelihood of falling in love by having someone threaten you with electric shock. It may sound absurd, but the science indicates that love is never straightforward. Renae Franiuk, a psychology professor at Aurora University, developed a test on whether or not you believe in soulmates. It might appear fanciful, but that belief can determine a lot about how you enter a relationship, and how long you might stay - even if it gets dangerous. Michelle Parise, creator of Alone: A Love Story, takes the test to find out where she lands

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Around the dinner table: struggles and rewards in family life

Carrah Quigley was 19 when she learned her father was a school shooter. Quigley explains how her father's story changed the way she understands violent crimes and the people who commit them. UBC sociologist Sinikka Elliott was curious about the current wisdom which says if you care about your family's well-being, take the time to cook them home-made meals. She found that the moral pressure placed on mealtime might be as damaging as it is helpful.

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Spirituality and survival

Twenty-five years ago this month, the Rwandan genocide began. Genocide survivor Eloge Butera was dealing with deep psychological trauma when he came to Canada several years after the atrocities. Not long after arriving in Winnipeg, Butera encountered a group of people specially equipped to help him learn to cope: elderly survivors of the Holocaust. Butera joins Mary Hynes to talk about his friendship with the Holocaust survivors, his eventual conversion to Judaism and his journey to find renewed meaning in life. Philip Clayton says a spiritual worldview -- which links humanity intrinsically to nature -- is needed before we can ever hope to create sustainable societies. Clayton says the lack of such a worldview explains why we know so much about the dangers of climate change, but are seemingly unable to do anything about it. Clayton teaches at the Claremont School of Theology in California and specializes in the link between science, philosophy and religion.

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No easy answers

Philosopher Lee McIntyre says more than ever, society needs its thinkers to engage in public discourse; and writer T. Wise struggles with how to honour his parents, now that it's too late to give them grandkids.

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The American dream and Canada's great outdoors: how these national ideals leave out people of colour

Author Reniqua Allen says once segregation ended as official US policy, black Americans started believing they too could benefit from the promise of economic freedom and upward mobility white Americans took for granted. Decades later, she says, the failure of that promise is driving young black Americans to burnout. Reniqua Allen joins Mary Hynes to discuss black millennial burnout and her new book, It Was All A Dream: How A New Generation is Navigating the Broken Promise of America. That stereotype that black people don't do the great outdoors ? Phillip Dwight Morgan blows it out of the water. He's an experienced rock climber, canoeist and camper with an endless list of back-country adventure stories. His status as a "real Canadian" is unimpeachable. But he wonders, why did he need to prove himself in the first place? Why is cycling the Trans-Canada any more Canadian than playing soccer in Scarborough, like he did as a kid? Poet and writer Phillip Dwight Morgan explores those questions on Tapestry.

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This writer used his stories about Canada's wilderness to belong. Here's why he stopped telling them.

That stereotype that black people don't do the great outdoors ? Phillip Dwight Morgan blows it out of the water. He's an experienced rock climber, canoeist and camper with an endless list of back-country adventure stories. His status as a "real Canadian" is unimpeachable. But he wonders, what does that even mean? And why did he need to prove himself in the first place? Why is cycling the Trans-Canada any more Canadian than playing soccer in Scarborough, like he did as a kid? Poet and writer Phillip Dwight Morgan explores those questions on Tapestry.

Download This writer used his stories about Canada's wilderness to belong. Here's why he stopped telling them.
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Black millennials contend with the broken promises of the American dream, says writer

Author Reniqua Allen says once segregation ended as official US policy, black Americans started believing they too could benefit from the promise of economic freedom and upward mobility white Americans took for granted. Decades later, she says, the failure of that promise is driving young black Americans to burnout. Reniqua Allen joins Mary Hynes to discuss black millennial burnout and her new book, It Was All A Dream: How A New Generation is Navigating the Broken Promise of America.

Download Black millennials contend with the broken promises of the American dream, says writer
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Ink and Identity

Tattoos and the very human desire to leave your mark - on yourself. Alethea Arnaquq-Baril, director of Tunniit: Retracing the Lines of Inuit Tattoos and Angry Inuk, explains why deciding to get traditional Inuit face tattoos was emotionally fraught - and what that means for non-Indigenous people looking to get the tattoos. Memphis Cadeau, co-owner of Grim City Tattoo Club in Hamilton, Ont., opens up about how tattoo removal and therapy are more similar than you might think. She works pro bono with a range of clients, from former gang members to victims of human trafficking, who say getting a tattoo removed can be life-changing. And Tapestry visits Chronic Ink in downtown Toronto to learn about the pain and pleasure of tattooing.

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When hope is 'punk' and grudges are forgiveness

Author Alexandra Rowland sparked a movement when she coined the term 'hopepunk.' She explains why, in literature, hope and stark realism are a powerful combination that can help readers grapple with the contemporary world. Forgive and remember, rather than forgive and forget says crime writer Sophie Hannah. Grudges are misunderstood and when we can learn to bear them productively, she says, we'll also learn to cope better when we've been wronged by others.

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Yes, and...

Improv comedy has been called scarier than death... but for Yitzi Gal who suffered from crushing social anxiety, and Allyssa Harmon, a teen on the autism spectrum, it's been a lifeline.

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Why so many of us are hustling past exhaustion

Millennials seem to be hitting walls of exhaustion and anxiety in droves. Precarity, debt, and social media are helping drive the problem. But what else about the times we live in are causing so much burnout? Mary speaks with Anne Helen Petersen, the author who sparked a widespread conversation about millennial burnout when her Buzzfeed News essay on the topic went viral. Mary also speaks to a professor who gave up his tenured position to hang out with monks in the desert ... as an antidote to burnout. And we hear from burnt out Canadians from coast to coast.

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The tyranny of beauty standards, and the men who fight them

In a society that values thinness, writer Anshuman Iddamsetty said the anger fat people recieve is as much about his rejection of social norms and expectations, as it is about being fat. Adam Smith, a writer and podcaster, decided to perform naked not once, but twice. He said he wanted to test his comfort level with his body, and so partook in a regular event called Naked Boys Reading.

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The loneliness of women's emotional labour and what we can do about it

Author Gemma Hartley spent years managing her household. All that extra work - the emotional labour needed to keep her husband and three kids comfortable - was going unacknowledged and undervalued ... till she hit her breaking point. Writer Stephen Marche shares the male perspective on emotional labour from a household where his wife is the chief breadwinner.

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A better way to be angry: advice from philosopher Martha Nussbaum

This week on Tapestry, Mary Hynes speaks with world-renowned philosopher Martha Nussbaum about anger - how it's used and abused, what it's for, and how human beings might learn to 'do' anger with a little more skill. Nussbaum's book on the subject is called "Anger and Forgiveness: Resentment, Generosity, Justice." Martha Nussbaum was the winner of the 2018 Berggruen Prize for Philosophy and Culture, a one million dollar award given to a thinker whose ideas have profoundly shaped the world. She is a professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago.

Download A better way to be angry: advice from philosopher Martha Nussbaum
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Episode: Connecting across divides

Rabbi David Rosen has worked in some very heated conflict zones - Ireland during "The Troubles", apartheid South Africa, and present-day Israel. Tahil Sharma draws on his dual faith background to build relationships across political and religious divides. Both men share their stories and perspectives on how to create meaningful relationships, especially when you don't see eye to eye.

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How we gather

One in three Canadians do not belong to a faith community. But we all seek meaning and a sense of purpose. In this episode, we explore some of the unorthodox places where people find fulfilment.

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How Michael Schur's The Good Place tackles moral philosophy with a healthy dose of optimism

Michael Schur has given a lot of thought to the meaning of life. He's the creator of NBC's The Good Place, a sitcom that is equal parts escapism and ethics lesson. Schur also co-created Parks and Rec and Brooklyn Nine-Nine, two TV shows with an unmistakable optimism and a certain affection for the human race.

Download How Michael Schur's The Good Place tackles moral philosophy with a healthy dose of optimism
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Finding Hope in the Climate Crisis

Novelist Margaret Atwood and ecological activist Vandana Shiva have been outspoken advocates for the environment for decades. They don't sugarcoat the enormity of the climate crisis humanity faces, but they do manage to find hope.

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Conversions

David Cain proposes a new tradition - "The Depth Year" - where you don't start anything new, but focus instead on what you've already begun. Martin Worthy shares memories about his life-long friend, writer and musician Paul Quarrington. And you'll hear an extraordinary performance of Quarrington's story "The Conversion", recorded just five months before he died.

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Tapestry Holiday Special

Season greetings from the team at Tapestry

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Why religion?

Religion scholar Elaine Pagels describes spiritual experiences she has had that defy explanation. Steven Newcomb explains why the Catholic Church needs to revoke a series of 15th century papal bulls. And Rignam Wangkhang brings you the art of kora, a Tibetan walking practice, from Kathmandu.

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When no option is a good option

Lisa Tessman is a moral philosopher with an interesting argument. She says doing the right thing is sometimes impossible - and it's good to acknowledge that. And Tapestry producer Arman Aghbali talks to Sara King-Abadi about the 'imposter syndrome' they share when it comes to their Iranian heritage.

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