Out in the Open

Discover three news stories we brought Out in the Open in 2017

Catch up on these Canadian news stories you may have missed by checking out Piya’s conversations with the people behind the headlines.
From left to right: Jordan Peterson, Coulten Boushie and Kelly Best (Courtesy of Jordan Peterson, Facebook and Marie Agioritis)


'I decided a long time ago that I was going to pay for saying what I thought'

In February 2017, Piya visited University of Toronto professor Jordan Peterson on campus to hear why he decided to speak his mind against gender neutral pronouns and against what he views as the bigger issue of political correctness on campus. Peterson has a lot of supporters. Some have pledged tens of thousands of dollars in donations to help him keep up the fight. He also has a lot of critics, including those who call him "privileged" and "transphobic". And he's continued to be a key figure in debates around free speech and academic freedom.

University of Toronto professor Jordan Peterson tells Piya why he decided to speak his mind against gender neutral pronouns and against what he views as the bigger issue of political correctness on campus. 13:02

'I was blind to the racial tension': Colten Boushie's family speaks out about the aftermath of his death

In August 2016, a 22-year-old Indigenous man named Colten Boushie was shot and killed on a farm in rural Saskatchewan. Farmer Gerald Stanley has been charged with second degree murder in the case. He's pleaded not guilty. Boushie's death has resurfaced divisions in the community and shone a light on racism Indigenous people continue to face across Canada. In January 2017, Piya sat down for an exclusive interview with Boushie's family, and explored what the case says about all Canadians. Stanley is set to stand trial starting in January 2018.

In August 2016, a 22-year-old Indigenous man named Colten Boushie was shot and killed on a farm in rural Saskatchewan. Piya sits down for an exclusive interview with Boushie's family, and explores what the case says about all Canadians. 54:00

Faces of Fentanyl

It killed hundreds last year. This year, thousands more will die. And the crisis is cutting across regions, class lines, and ages. In October 2017, Piya spoke with people directly affected by fentanyl, the lethal drug that's moving its way across Canada.

It killed hundreds last year. This year, thousands more will die. And the crisis is cutting across regions, class lines, and ages. This week, Piya talks to people directly affected by fentanyl, the lethal drug that's moving its way across Canada. 54:00