Out in the Open·Full Episode

Point of Pride

We all want to feel proud of who we are, the work we do and the values we hold strong. But left unchecked, pride can turn into an outsized feeling of self-regard that can even hurt other people. This week, Piya rides that fine line by asking: What's the point of pride?

Left unchecked, pride can turn into an outsized feeling of self-regard. Piya asks: What's the point of pride?

Edgar Rodriguez kissing Tom Ryan on Eighth Avenue in New York. (Submitted by Edgar Rodriguez)

This episode was originally published on May 3, 2019.

We all want to feel proud of who we are, the work we do and the values we hold strong. But left unchecked, pride can turn into an outsized feeling of self-regard that can even hurt other people. This week, Piya rides that fine line by asking: What's the point of pride?

Here are the stories from this week's episode...

Gay police officer fights for feeling pride in the force

Edgar Rodriguez is proud to be gay and proud to be a police officer. But for a time, he didn't feel able to be himself in a culture where he saw homophobia at play. He tells Piya how that changed, and why it's important to him to march in uniform at the pride parade. For Edgar, putting both senses of pride on display is key to building trust with the community.

'I felt like my home kind of turned against me': Newfoundlander grapples with provincial pride and prejudice

Avi Cheema is deeply proud of her Newfoundland upbringing. But as the daughter of Indian immigrants, she's also experienced racism in the majority white province. Avi speaks with Piya about how she thinks Newfoundland pride serves to protect its distinct culture, but if taken too far, also runs the risk of shutting other people out.

How this former pickup artist is relearning what it means to be a 'real man'

Growing up, Harris O'Malley didn't feel like his lived up to the stereotype of a "real man". So in his 20s, he tried to change that by becoming a pickup artist. But eventually, he realized it was a destructive path. He speaks with Piya about finding the balance in extremes and what he's learned about taking pride in being a man during a time of strong gender politics.

Why children of immigrant Asian parents crave these words: 'I'm proud of you'

When Grace Hwang Lynch was a kid, she craved hearing her parents say "I'm proud of you." But they never did. She speaks with Piya about growing up with a North American cultural model that says parents should be effusive when those were not the cultural values of her immigrant parents, and how she's reconciled that in adulthood.

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