Out in the Openwith Piya Chattopadhyay

Latest

Loving your body means hating it sometimes

Jill Andrew has had a complicated relationship with her body. She’s had moments of hating it for its size and because it has let her down.

Learning to forgive your father by becoming him

After a mental breakdown sidetracked his life and career, Chris Emmanuel was able to work through a traumatic memory of his father’s punishment.

How a torture victim is transforming her hate into a fight for justice

Minoo Homily no longer hates her torturers or wants them harmed. What she wants is justice.

Fighting hate with friendship — one Exalted Cyclops at a time

Daryl Davis is a black blues musician. He's befriended hundreds of Ku Klux Klan members, many of whom have since changed their views on white supremacy. And he’s got dozens of robes and hoods in his closet to prove it.

Former member of Canadian white supremacist group says hatred must be met 'with an open heart'

Elizabeth Moore was one of the few female members of the neo-Nazi group the Heritage Front in the early 1990s.
Full Episode

Cut Through Hate

From strident political divides, to people protesting other people at rallies, to numerous stories of harassment and assault... it feels like hate is all around us today. This week, Piya speaks with haters and their targets, and asks: How do you cut through hate?

'There isn't anywhere to go': Ontario halfway house for aging inmates addressing gap in prison system

1 in 4 federal inmates behind bars is aged 50 or older, says Canada's correctional investigator. At Haley House, a unique halfway house in Ontario, specifically caters to the needs of older and palliative offenders on parole — a type of facility prisoner advocates say we need more of.

Going public with Weinstein allegations was the 'right thing to do,' Erika Rosenbaum says one year later

The Montreal actress describes how life on set has changed after going public with her allegations of harassment by Harvey Weinstein, and in the wake of the wider #MeToo movement.

#MeToo and You

One year after the hashtag #MeToo took off, motivating victims of sexual harassment and assault to go public about their experiences, Piya speaks with people about how it has -- or has not -- changed their own lives.

Going public with Weinstein allegations was the 'right thing to do,' Erika Rosenbaum says one year later

The Montreal actress describes how life on set has changed after going public with her allegations of harassment by Harvey Weinstein, and in the wake of the wider #MeToo movement.

'Love brought me back': Father deported, then detained reflects on time apart from family

Olukunle Adetunji was deported to Nigeria in 2014 and came back to Canada two years later, only to be found out and detained. After his release, he says all he wants is to be with his family.

'As a caregiver, why can't we join with our family here?'

Cristina Acuram came to Canada in 2007 as a caregiver to support her four children back in the Philippines. She’s still waiting to hear whether her family can join her in Canada.

Refugee parents can bring their kids to Canada, so why can't kids bring their parents?

Elisée Makola and Humayun Sawar came to Canada years ago and have yet to be reunited with their parents.

The complicated nature of feeling like you're a part of the family you work for

Herly Bautista is a live-in nanny. She’s both an employee and says she feels a part of the family she works for.

'As a caregiver, why can't we join with our family here?'

Cristina Acuram came to Canada in 2007 as a caregiver to support her four children back in the Philippines. She’s still waiting to hear whether her family can join her in Canada.

'Love brought me back': Father deported, then detained reflects on time apart from family

Olukunle Adetunji was deported to Nigeria in 2014 and came back to Canada two years later, only to be found out and detained. After his release, he says all he wants is to be with his family.

'As a caregiver, why can't we join with our family here?'

Cristina Acuram came to Canada in 2007 as a caregiver to support her four children back in the Philippines. She’s still waiting to hear whether her family can join her in Canada.

Refugee parents can bring their kids to Canada, so why can't kids bring their parents?

Elisée Makola and Humayun Sawar came to Canada without their parents and have yet to be reunited years later.

Parent-Child Separation

This week, Piya Chattopadhyay delves into different ways parent-child separation happens in the name of immigration enforcement here in Canada, with people who have directly experienced it.

'Love brought me back': Father deported, then detained reflects on time apart from family

Olukunle Adetunji was deported to Nigeria in 2014 and came back to Canada two years later, only to be found out and detained. After his release, he says all he wants is to be with his family.

Refugee parents can bring their kids to Canada, so why can't kids bring their parents?

Elisée Makola and Humayun Sawar came to Canada without their parents and have yet to be reunited years later.

'There isn't anywhere to go': Ontario halfway house for aging inmates addressing gap in prison system

Haley House, a unique halfway house in Ontario, specifically caters to the needs of older and palliative offenders on parole — a type of facility prisoner advocates say we need more of.

'There isn't anywhere to go': Ontario halfway house for aging inmates addressing gap in prison system

Haley House, a unique halfway house in Ontario, specifically caters to the needs of older and palliative offenders on parole — a type of facility prisoner advocates say we need more of.

'It's a wound I don't think will ever get covered': Five stories of life after the Toronto van attack

A survivor, a witness, a victim's family, the city's mayor and more talk to Out in the Open host Piya Chattopadhyay about what happens in the aftermath of mass tragedy.

'It's a wound I don't think will ever get covered': Five stories of life after the Toronto van attack

When a man in a van went barrelling into pedestrians in Toronto's north end on April 23, 2018, people across the city and country were shocked. The attack left 10 people dead and injured 16 more. Out in the Open host Piya Chattopadhyay speaks with those directly affected by it about what happens in the aftermath of mass tragedy.