Out in the Open

Infertility upended his notions of what it means to be a man and husband

Vince Londini always expected that he and his wife would have kids, and long believed one of his primary roles both as a man and a religious person was to play his part in bringing them into the world. But those notions were shattered when he discovered he was infertile.

'I'm the end of my family line – that's hard news,' says Vince Londini

Vince Londini in 2018 (Submitted by Vince Londini)

This story was originally published on January 3, 2020.

Vince Londini and his wife tried to conceive for a couple of years with no success. When Londini decided to go through fertility testing, he wasn't prepared for the diagnosis: he had no sperm.

"The future I imagined has disappeared and it's my fault," he thought to himself after getting the result.

Londini always expected that he and his wife would have kids, and long believed one of his primary roles both as a man and a religious person was to play his part in bringing them into the world. But those notions were shattered following his diagnosis.

Londini speaks with Out in the Open host Piya Chattopadhyay about how this challenged his ideas of masculinity, legacy and faith.


This story appears in the Out in the Open episode "Inside Infertility".

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