Now Or Never

What's old is new again: How the pandemic is inspiring people to reuse everything

Being stuck between the same four walls has given some people a newfound appreciation for the objects around them.
Anna McCrae gives Ify a portion of 'Cornelius', a sourdough starter that is at least 150 years old! (CBC / Bridget Forbes)

In the past year, many of us have spent our time cooped up at home.

But while we might be missing the world outside, being stuck between the same four walls has given some people a newfound appreciation for the objects around them. Others are taking it even further — and finding creative ways to reuse and re-purpose the things they might otherwise throw away. 

On this Now and Never, meet people who are taking something old and making it feel new again.

  • When Anna McCrae met a 150-year-old sourdough starter named Cornelius, she had no idea the ways it would comfort her through a pandemic. She challenges Ify to make her very first loaf of bread.
  • Bacon scented erasers? When the salvage section of the infamous Yellowknife dump shut down because of COVID-19, residents found themselves offering up their unique items on Facebook. Trevor scrolls through, trying to get his hand on a coveted item.
  • Provinces apart, Emily Rendell-Watson and her mom bond over an old, well-used, pink fleece sweater.
  • Needing something familiar to get through the day, musician and theatre performer Brendan McLeod is writing poetry again for the first time in over a decade.
  • For 30 years, Todd Gee and his family have been passing around a "golden atrocity" of a family heirloom. We join in as the next recipient (target, perhaps?) welcomes it into her home.

This episode originally aired in May 2020

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