Now Or Never

How small towns are coping with COVID-19

While many Canadians remain sheltered-in-place in cities and urban centres, rural and remote communities across the country have been fighting back against COVID-19 in their own unique ways.
Hear from a resident of North Preston, N.S., Canada's oldest and largest black community, about how her community is fighting to survive the pandemic. (Paul Adams for CBC)

While many Canadians remain sheltered-in-place in cities and urban centres, rural and remote communities across the country have been fighting back against COVID-19 in their own unique ways. 

So on this Now or Never, we're (figuratively) packing up our car and heading out on the road to hear how small towns are coping with the pandemic.

  • After losing a friend (and fellow grocery store owner) to coronavirus, Mike Carter's grocery store — the only one in Milverton, Ont. — has literally become his home.
  • Kardeisha Provo shares how a coronavirus outbreak in North Preston, N.S., Canada's oldest and largest black community, is requiring the community to do what it does best: fight to survive.
  • Kelly Waters and Glennda Ilett poured their savings into opening their dream business She-Nanigans, a performance venue in North Battleford, Sask. What they didn't budget for was a global pandemic.
  • "We will go in every day because we have a responsibility to feed the world". Meet cattle rancher Mike Neave in northern B.C., who is focused on feeding the world while making it through another busy calving season.
  • With mosques and Islamic centres closed during the holy month of Ramadan, Nazim Awan — head of the Islamic centre in Yellowknife — invites us to an in-home evening prayer.
  • For border town St. Stephen, N.B, it will be a while before cross-border families can do more than wave at each other across the Canada-US border. Mayor Allan MacEachern shares his concerns about the impact on families and the economy.
  • While there aren't any coronavirus cases in Tuktoyaktuk, N.W.T., there is still a lot to be concerned about. We check in on Noella Cockney who is fighting to save her home from coastal erosion.

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