The Return of History: Your Questions

The CBC Massey Lectures inspire a lot of provocative questions -- and thoughtful answers -- in each city on the tour. In this episode, you'll hear the best of those audience questions with a bonus: questions posed by you, our radio and online audiences, and put to Massey Lecturer Jennifer Welsh by Paul Kennedy.
Jennifer Welsh answering questions from the audience in Toronto after delivering The 2016 CBC Massey Lectures, "The Return of History". (CBC)
Listen to the full episode53:57

Jennifer Welsh's 2016 CBC Massey Lectures: The Return of History is a stunning tour-de-force survey of the world we live in. Francis Fukuyama made his ill-fated proposal that history had ended in 1989. As communism was collapsing it looked like Western liberal democracy was here to stay. Fukyama argued that no new or better political system could possibly emerge, and that peace and international stability were definitely here to stay. Well, we know how that worked out. Jennifer Welsh's elegant essays explored what went wrong with those expectations, and why. **This episode originally aired April 3, 2017.

Terrorism or inequality, which is the greater threat? 1:10


 

If liberal democracy is such a good political system, then why is the world in such disarray?


The Massey Lectures are recorded on a tour that takes place across the country but what you rarely hear in the broadcasts are the questions and answers that follow the live event in each city.

In this episode, you'll hear the best of those audience questions with a bonus: questions posed by you, our radio and online audiences. Paul Kennedy talks to Jennifer Welsh at her office in Europe via Skype.
 

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