Ideas

The Monster At The End - Lynn Coady

There's a lot of anxiety about the supposed 'end' of the book as we know it. But exactly what are we so worried about? In a lecture given at the Canadian Literature Centre at the University of Alberta in Edmonton and in interview with Paul Kennedy, novelist Lynn Coady explores what happens if we separate the idea of 'the book' from the experience they've traditionally provided.
Lynn Coady (CBC)
Listen to the full episode53:58

There's a lot of anxiety about the supposed 'end' of the book as we know it.  But exactly what are we so worried about? In a lecture given at the Canadian Literature Centre at the University of Alberta in Edmonton and in interview with Paul Kennedy, novelist Lynn Coady explores what happens if we separate the idea of 'the book' from the experience they've traditionally provided.  **This episode originally aired May 6, 2015.


Lynn Coady presented 2015 Henry Kreisel Memorial Lecture at the Canadian Literature Centre at the University of Alberta. Her lecture was called Who Needs Books? 

Lynn Coady is an award-winning author and journalist whose work has consistently drawn critical and public attention. Her first novel, Strange Heaven, was a Governor General's Award nominee.  Her subsequent books, Play the Monster Blind, Saints of Big Harbour, and Mean Boy were each recognized by the Globe and Mail as a "Best Book" in 2000, 2002, 2006 respectively.  In 2011, her novel The Antagonist was shortlisted for the prestigious Scotiabank Giller Prize, an award she won in 2013 for her her short story collection Hellgoing.  Her journalism has been published in such publications as Saturday Night and Chatelaine, and Coady is also a founding editor of the Edmonton-based magazine, Eighteen Bridges.

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