The importance of being ethical with Dr. Janet Rossant

Winner of the 2016 Friesen International Prize for Health Science Research, Dr. Janet Rossant argues that recent revolutions in genetic medicine demand comparable advances in our understanding of the underlying morality and ethics. She presents her arguments in a public lecture in Ottawa and an interview by Paul Kennedy.
Janet Rossant at the Hospital for Sick Children. (Hospital for Sick Children/Canadian Press)
Listen to the full episode54:00

Winner of the 2016 Friesen International Prize for Health Science Research, Dr. Janet Rossant argues that recent revolutions in genetic medicine demand comparable advances in our understanding of the underlying morality and ethics. 

Dr. Janet Rossant discusses the exciting possibilities now available for young people considering careers in science. 1:12


"How do we draw the line between fixing a terrible disease and enhancing the human condition?"

After spending years studying the genetic development of mouse and human embryos, Dr. Rossant paved the way for important new possibilities in medical science -- particularly in the area of stem cell therapy. Much of this research was conducted at the Hospital for Sick Children, in Toronto. She is now President and Chief Scientist for the Gairdner Foundation. We hear highlights from her 2016 Henry G. Friesen Lecture, in Ottawa, as well as an interview with Paul Kennedy.

Web Extra | Dr. Janet Rossant - The Tao of Discovery
The Tao of Discovery documentary series profiles eight medical researchers who have been honoured with the Premier's Summit Award. In it, the scientists explain their personal "Tao of discovery"-- the origin and evolution of the "Eureka!" moment that ignited their careers.



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**This episode was produced by Paul Kennedy


 

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