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The Enright Files - Understanding the terror attacks in Paris

We spent much of the past year puzzling over the rise of ISIS and how best to prevent them from raining more terror and carnage on the Middle East and the West. This edition of The Enright Files looks back at some of our conversations from 2015 with people who tried to help us understand the terror attacks in Paris and the questions that flow from them.
The attacks in Paris have caused widespread grief throughout the city; a city rocked by deadly terror attacks at the beginning of 2015--the shooting at Charlie Hebdo magazine and a hostage-taking at a Jewish supermarket--and a city now ending the year with another horrific wave of violence. The woman in the middle works at one of the restaurants targeted in the attack. (Ellen Mauro/CBC)
Listen to the full episode54:00

We spent much of the past year puzzling over the rise of ISIS and how best to prevent them from raining more terror and carnage on the Middle East and the West. This edition of The Enright Files looks back at some of our conversations from 2015 with people who tried to help us understand the terror attacks in Paris and the questions that flow from them.

Michael Enright speaks to Adam Gopnik, writer for The New Yorker; Syrian-born Church of England priest Nadim Nassar; University of Toronto expert on Islamic law Mohammed Fadel; and Paul Rogers, Professor of Peace Studies at the University of Bradford in the United Kingdom.

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