Ideas

The Enright Files on America's Culture of Violence

The United States may not be the most violent nation on the planet, but its spasms of violence, particularly manifested in mass shootings, grip the world's attention. On this month's edition of The Enright Files we revisit some of Michael Enright's interviews on America's culture of violence -- one that's complicated by the nation's long history of racial tensions and one that's exacerbated by the nation's long love affair with guns.
(Frederic J. Brown/Getty Images)

The United States may not be the most violent nation on the planet, but its spasms of violence, particularly manifested in mass shootings, grip the world's attention. On this month's edition of The Enright Files we revisit some of Michael Enright's interviews on America's culture of violence -- one that's complicated by the nation's long history of racial tensions and one that's exacerbated by the nation's long love affair with guns.


Guests in this episode:

  • Andrew Solomon is a frequent contributor to The New Yorker, The New York Times and many other publications.His literary field of vision ranges widely over the arts, politics and psychology, and he is a long-time advocate for LGBT rights. His most recent book is Far and Away: Reporting from the Brink of Change
     
  • Rebecca Solnit is an essayist, author, environmental and political activist whose work and energies run the gamut from climate change to women's rights, especially violence against women. She is the author of more than 17 books, and her journalism has appeared in numerous publications, in the U.S. and internationally.
     
  • Saul Cornell is the Paul and Diane Gunther Chair in History at Fordham University. He's the former Director of the Second Amendment Research Center, and the author of A Well-Regulated Militia: The Founding Fathers and the Origins of Gun Control in America. 
     
  • Patricia Williams is an astute analyst of race and and the law. She's the James L. Dohr Professor of Law at Columbia University, and her books include The Alchemy of Race and Rights and Seeing a Color Blind Future: The Paradox of Race. She also writes a column called Diary of a Mad Law Professor for The Nation magazine. 

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