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The Audience Talks Back: The 2018 CBC Massey Lectures

On the CBC Massey Lectures tour, each lecture concluded in an audience discussion with Tanya Talaga - most of which was never broadcast. In the original broadcast of the Massey Lectures, we invited you - the radio audience - to send in your questions for Tanya Talaga, so on this episode: Tanya Talaga in conversation with Greg Kelly about her experience of delivering the Massey Lectures, also responding to some of the questions you sent in, plus some of the best of those audience discussions from the tour.
Tanya Talaga gets a standing ovation at the conclusion of her Massey Lecture at the Thunder Bay Community Auditorium in Thunder Bay, ON., on Oct. 16, 2018. (Sinisa Jolic/CBC)
Listen to the full episode53:59

On the CBC Massey Lectures tour, each lecture concluded in an audience discussion with Tanya Talaga — most of which was never broadcast. In the original broadcast of the Massey Lectures, we invited you — the radio audience — to send in your questions for Tanya Talaga.

In this episode, Tanya Talaga talks with Greg Kelly about her experience of delivering the CBC Massey Lectures, and responds to some of the questions sent to her, plus some of the best of those audience discussions from the tour.

Tanya Talaga's five CBC Massey Lectures were a national sensation, and audiences across the country had lots to say in the discussions that followed in each city, as did the radio audience.

Tanya Talaga delivered the 2018 CBC Massey Lecture: "All My Relations, Finding the Path Forward." 1:09

All Our Relations: Finding the Path Forward

The title of the lectures perhaps gives a large clue to the passionate response they received: All Our Relations is an expression that's common among Indigenous peoples on both sides of the border.

You might hear it at the end of a sacred ceremony, a smudge ceremony perhaps: someone might say "all our relations" or "all my relations".

Tanya Talaga with her elder, Sam Achneepineskum, on the 2018 CBC Massey Lectures tour at Wanuskewin Heritage Park in Saskatoon. (Philip Coulter/CBC)

What does it mean? Well, for Indigenous peoples it's an expression of the unity of all of us, a reminder that we are all connected, a community.

And maybe the most important thing that's come out of these lectures is this heightened sense of community.
 



**This episode was produced by Philip Coulter.

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