Ideas

The 2016 U.S. Election: We had no idea it would be like this

When Hillary Clinton announced that she would run for President, everyone knew the 2016 United States election could be a historic one. We had no idea how historic or unprecedented this election would become. On this month's edition of The Enright Files, we revisit The Sunday Edition’s coverage of the candidates and the turmoil within their parties in the months leading up to the election — and the growing unease around what the election would mean for the U.S. and the rest of the world.
Republican U.S. presidential nominee Donald Trump and Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Hillary Clinton greet one another as they take the stage for their first debate at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, U.S. September 26, 2016. (Jonathan Ernst/Reuters)
Listen to the full episode53:59

When Hillary Clinton announced that she would run for President, everyone knew the 2016 United States election could be a historic one. We had no idea how historic or unprecedented this election would become. On this month's edition of The Enright Files, we revisit The Sunday Edition's coverage of the candidates and the turmoil within their parties in the months leading up to the election — and the growing unease around what the election would mean for the U.S. and the rest of the world.


Guests in this episode:

  • Joan Walsh, National Correspondent for The Nation magazine and political analyst for MSNBC.
     
  • Thomas Frank, columnist with Harper's Magazine, and author of What's Wrong with Kansas: How Conservatives Won the Heart of America and Listen, Liberal: or Whatever Happened to the Party of the People.
     
  • David Frum, former speechwriter for President George W. Bush, conservative commentator and senior editor at the Atlantic Magazine.
     
  • Arlie Hochschild, Professor Emerita in the department of sociology at the University of California at Berkeley and author of Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right.
     
  • Moustafa Bayoumi, Canadian-American associate professor of English at Brooklyn College and author of How Does It Feel to Be a Problem: Being Young and Arab in America.
     
  • Patricia J. Williams, James L. Dohr Professor of Law at Columbia University and author of The Alchemy of Race and Rights and Seeing a ColorBlind Future: The Paradox of Race.

**The Enright Files is produced by Chris Wodskou.

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