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Civilians and War: The Reith Lectures by Margaret MacMillan

We tend to think of war as a temporary breakdown, an interruption in our normally peaceful existence. But what if it isn't? What if it's an innate and inescapable aspect of humanity? In her BBC Reith Lectures, called "The Mark of Cain", historian Margaret MacMillan ponders whether we're destined to fight, and explores our very complicated feelings about war. (Lecture 3)

The Amorous Heart: Why we love the ❤ symbol

You might think that the heart symbol ❤ and romantic love have always been bedfellows. But you’d be wrong. At times, the symbol was just a decoration. At others, it meant spiritual, chaste love. At still others, romantic and carnal. Marilyn Yalom the author of "The Amorous Heart: An Unconventional History of Love". In it, she traces the astonishing, centuries-long journey of how the symbol took on all the meanings it has today.

Wrestling with the Stoics: Tips from a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu philosopher

Michael Tremblay holds a black belt Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and competes at world championships. He is also a PhD student in philosophy at Queen's University, who’s studying Stoicism. In fact, he hopes to become a Stoic ‘sage’ himself, and focuses his work on the 1st-century Greek philosopher, Epictetus, whom he sees as a kind of life coach.

Kent Monkman: Decolonizing art history

It's easy to identify a painting by Kent Monkman. His work is almost always monumental. Some of his canvasses as so big that buildings need to be built around them. Beyond that, Monkman often works with historical subjects -- either quoting famous images from the history of art, or playing with real historical events by situating them in paintings that reflect obvious artistic references. Kent Monkman talks with Paul Kennedy about his life and work, and how to have fun while making serious statements about the world we live in.

Ideas for February 2019

Highlights this month include: "Lonely Together (Feb 28) -- Tom Jokinen looks at how urban centres themselves may actually be the cause of urban isolation. And "Reading Montaigne" (Feb 11) -- Tony Luppino opens the texts and life of Western literature's original 'free thinker' who wrote on everything from idleness and liars, to wearing clothes and punishing cowardice.

Reading Montaigne: Why a 16th century writer still matters today

Michel de Montaigne was many things: a 16th century French writer, bureaucrat, and self-defined accidental philosopher. He’s also the inventor of a new literary form we now call the essay. His Essais – various "trials" or "experiments" in ideas – have touched centuries of readers and writers. Flaubert once exhorted us to "read him in order to live." Contributor Tony Luppino opens the writings and life of Western literature's original 'free thinker', who wrote on everything from idleness and liars, to wearing clothes and punishing cowardice.
IDEAS AFTERNOON

The Accommodating Space: A Hotel Check-In

A guest checks into a Las Vegas hotel suite, and makes it a fortress, staging a mass shooting on the city below. It's a horrific act that seems to subvert the very ethos of hotels — places of hospitality and calm. Yet hotels contain multitudes. They are sites of fantasy and functionality, pleasure and trouble. Their spaces are public and private, workplace and bedroom. They exist to house us temporarily, in luxury or in squalor.

Making Sense of the Warrior: The Reith Lectures by Margaret MacMillan

We tend to think of war as a temporary breakdown, an interruption in our normally peaceful existence. But what if it isn't? What if it's an innate and inescapable aspect of humanity? In her BBC Reith Lectures, historian — and past Massey Lecturer — Margaret MacMillan ponders whether we're destined to fight, and explores our very complicated feelings about war. (Lecture 2)

The 1973 CBC Massey Lectures, "Designing Freedom"

Distinguished cyberneticist Stafford Beer states the case for a new science of systems theory and cybernetics. His essays examine such issues as "The Real Threat to All We Hold Most Dear," "The Discarded Tools of Modern Man," "A Liberty Machine in Prototype," "Science in the Service of Man," "The Future That Can Be Demanded Now," "The Free Man in a...

The Sewers of Paris and the Making of the Modern City, Part 2

Sewers are a relatively modern phenomenon. For centuries, people in cities lived intimately with their waste. The price paid for that lack of awareness about hygiene was of course disease and plague — as well as unbearable stench. Understanding how germs and diseases are spread led to sanitation and sewers — and to the modern city. The rebuilding of Paris in the mid-19th century was a great civic achievement and a new idea of society only made possible because it was built on sewers. Philip Coulter goes underground in the City of Light to visit the City of Smells.

Journalism's Knife Fight: Fact vs. Truth

While the idea that we're living in a post-truth era is still highly contested, there is greater agreement that facts themselves have also become contestable. Belief and feeling have sideswiped facts, especially when it comes to news stories about politics. IDEAS producer Naheed Mustafa examines the increasingly elastic and unsettling relationship between facts and truth.
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Daniel Dale believes fact-checking Donald Trump has pushed him to rethink the relationship a journalist has with the truth.

Daniel Dale is the Washington bureau chief for The Toronto Star.
Audio

Journalism's Knife Fight: Fact vs. Truth

While the idea that we're living in a post-truth era is still highly contested, there is greater agreement that facts themselves have also become contestable. Belief and feeling have sideswiped facts, especially when it comes to news stories about politics. IDEAS producer Naheed Mustafa examines the increasingly elastic and unsettle relationship between facts and truth.
Audio

Amanda Rogers talks about the impact of technology on how we view credibility and authenticity.

Amanda Rogers is visiting assistant professor of humanities at Colgate University.
Audio

Lindsay Fitzgerald talks about how the collapsing of the media industry has affected how journalists see their role as tellers of truths.

Lindsay Fitzgerald is a documentary filmmaker.
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Carlin Romano talks about the need for journalists to grapple with the meaning of truth and fact in this new age of shifting credibility.

Carlin Romano is professor of philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania.
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Daniel Dale talks about the way his relationship with the truth has shifted since he began fact-checking Donald Trump.

Daniel Dale is the Washington bureau chief for The Toronto Star.

The New Masters: The 2018 Sobey Art Award

The painter Paul Gauguin once said: "Art is either revolution or plagiarism." Five contemporary Canadian artists live up to the first comparison in that quote, or at least, they fiercely stir the pot. They are the finalists and winner of the 2018 Sobey Art Award. Their work is smart, insightful and full of beauty. In this series, meet Jon Rafman, Joi T. Arcand, Jordan Bennett, Jeneen Frei Njootli and Kapwani Kiwanga.
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The New Masters: The 2018 Sobey Art Award, Part 2

Producer Mary Lynk in conversation with Sobey Art Award finalists Jeneen Frei Njootli (West Coast & Yukon), Joi T. Arcand (Prairies and the North) and winner Kapwani Kiwanga (Ontario).

The Enright Files on Pioneering Female Poets

It doesn’t seem strange that the best-loved and best-selling English language poets should be women, but that wasn’t always the case. In fact, arguably the greatest American poet of the 19th Century – Emily Dickinson – wrote in total obscurity during her life. But by the middle of the 20th Century, Dickinson, and the generations of female poets she inspired, were beginning to get their due. On this month's edition of The Enright Files, conversations about Emily Dickinson, Sylvia Plath and Adrienne Rich – women who inspired poets of the last few decades.
Audio

The Enright Files on Pioneering Female Poets

It doesn't seem strange that the best-loved and best-selling English language poets should be women, but that wasn't always the case. In fact, arguably the greatest American poet of the 19th Century - Emily Dickinson - wrote in total obscurity during her life. But by the middle of the 20th Century, Dickinson, and the generations of female poets she inspired, were beginning to get their due. On this month's edition of The Enright Files, conversations about Emily Dickinson, Sylvia Plath and Adrienne Rich - women who inspired poets of the last few decades.

War and Humanity: The Reith Lectures by Margaret MacMillan

We like to think of war as a temporary breakdown, an interruption in our normally peaceful existence. But what if it isn't? What if it's an innate and inescapable aspect of humanity? In her BBC Reith Lectures "The Mark of Cain", historian Margaret MacMillan ponders whether we're destined to fight, and explores our very complicated feelings about war. (Lecture 1)
Audio

War and Humanity: The Reith Lectures by Margaret MacMillan (Lecture 1)

We like to think of war as a temporary breakdown, an interruption in our normally peaceful existence. But what if it isn't? What if it's an innate and inescapable aspect of humanity? In her BBC Reith Lectures "The Mark of Cain", historian Margaret MacMillan ponders whether we're destined to fight, and explores our very complicated feelings about war.
Audio

Doug White believes that the fundamental value missing in our conversations about reconciliation is love.

Doug White delivered the keynote address at Vancouver Island University's fourth annual Indigenous Speakers Series.

Ideas in the Afternoon for February 2019

Ideas in the Afternoon airs Mondays at 2:05 pm on CBC Radio One.