Ideas

Documentary series The Nerve explores how music informs the human experience

From the team behind the Peabody-Award-winning documentary The Wire, another sonic adventure series exploring the beauty and mysteries of our relationship with music. Episode 1 of The Nerve: Music & the Human Experience focuses on music and the brain. The Nerve first aired in 2008, and is presented by Jowi Taylor.

Episode One looks at the relationship between music and the brain.

Luis Carlos Ledezma, 12, practices his saxophone outside his house in El Chorrillo in Panama City. (Carlos Jasso/Reuters)
Listen to the full episode53:59

Whether you're a karaoke assassin, or classical music scholar, a jazz aficionado or dance club kid, you've probably had some elementary but central questions about music. Why does it exist? How does it wield such power over us?

Those questions, asked across almost every genre, fuel a six-part documentary series called The Nerve. The immersive audio experience first aired on CBC in 2008 and is being reprised this summer on IDEAS.

The Nerve was created by the Peabody Award-winning team behind another great music series, The Wire: The Impact of Electricity on Music.

Episode 1 of The Nerve explores the relationship between music and the brain. It's called Wired for Sound.

The Nerve is produced by Paolo Pietropaolo, Chris Brookes, and host Jowi Taylor.  

**Note: this series is not available for download and is available for listening in Canada only due to music copyright restrictions. 

Guests in this episode: 

Episode 1 features music from these artists and composers:

  • Rodgers and Hammerstein 
  • Julie Andrews 
  • Arvo Pärt
  • Antonin Dvorak
  • Ludwig van Beethoven 
  • Stevie Wonder 
  • Arnold Schoenberg 
  • Radiohead 
  • The Beatles 
  • Maurice Ravel 
  • Judy Garland 
  • Amjad Ali Khan 
  • The Royal Yogyakarta Palace Gamelan 
  • Peter Tchaikovsky 
  • The Rolling Stones

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