Ideas

Connecting the Dots: The Mystery of Single Personality Disorder

At first glance, a disorder with this name might easily appear ridiculous. But IDEAS contributor Barbara Nichol, in conversation with host Paul Kennedy, describes the thinking behind the syndrome -- and the logic which takes SPD from punch-line to paradigm, and an intriguing new model of the human personality.
(Bob Wands/AP)

At first glance, a disorder with this name might easily appear ridiculous. But IDEAS contributor Barbara Nichol, in conversation with host Paul Kennedy, describes the thinking behind the syndrome -- and the logic which takes SPD from punch-line to paradigm, and an intriguing new model of the human personality.


Participants in the program:

Edward Shorter is a professor of psychiatry at The University of Toronto and holds the History of Medicine Chair in the faculty of medicine at The University of Toronto. He's published extensively the history of psychiatry. His most recent book is What Psychiatry Left Out of the DSM-5: Historical Mental Disorders Today.

Paul McHugh is the University Distinguished Service Professor of Psychiatry and formerly (1975-2001) Henry Phipps Professor of Psychiatry, Director of the Department of Psychiatry, and Psychiatrist-in-Chief at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and Hospital.

John J. Ratey, MD, is an Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He has published over 60 peer-reviewed articles on the topics of Aggression, Autism, ADHD, and other issues in Neuropsychiatry, and written 8 books published in 14 languages. With the publication of his latest book, Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and The Brain, (2008), Dr. Ratey has established himself as a leading expert in the brain-fitness connection.Dr. Ratey maintains a private practice in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and is currently working on a new book examining our genetic roots and the influence on our psychology in a modern world, titled, Go Wild to be published by Little Brown, June, 2014.

Michael Ondaatje is Michael Ondaatje.

Barbara Nichol is very grateful to all of the above.


What's true and what's not:

No-one out there has proposed the idea of Single Personality Disorder or the Co-Existing Personality Model.

There was no Karen M. or a diagnosis of "Twinlessness."

Nosology exists.

The Latin terms were invented.

There is no such book as: The Gods Within Us

Rotational therapy did exist and was conjured up by Darwin's grandfather.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversationCreate account

Already have an account?

now