A Word To The Wise, Part 2

Times have changed. So has the study of wisdom. Philosophers, make room for the scientists! In this two-part series, Marilyn Powell talks to psychologists, sociologists,  neuroscientists - and the wise that dwell among us - about a very old topic. What they have discovered about the nature of wisdom and being wise will enlighten and surprise you....
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Times have changed. So has the study of wisdom. Philosophers, make room for the scientists! In this two-part series, Marilyn Powell talks to psychologists, sociologists,  neuroscientists - and the wise that dwell among us - about a very old topic. What they have discovered about the nature of wisdom and being wise will enlighten and surprise you.

We want it, and we sure do need wisdom in the world we live in. For thousands of years, philosophers and theologians have been telling us that. It can open our eyes to what's really important. Trouble is, wisdom isn't easy to find. But maybe it's always been there, and we have to start thinking about wisdom in a different way.

Who better to study the nature of wisdom than scientists? - as they've just begun to do in the last few decades.

Not that philosophers and theologians of the past were wrong in their thinking. It's more a case of putting their judgments to the test.


Participants:


Monika Ardelt, Sociologist and Wisdom Researcher at the University of Florida.

Stephen S. Hall, Author of the book Wisdom: from Philosophy to Neuroscience, Vintage Books, 2010.

Howard Nusbaum, Cognitive Neuroscientist and Professor of Psychology at the University of Chicago.

John Vervaeke, Cognitive Scientist at the University of Toronto.

Laura Carstensen, Professor of Psychology at Standford University and Founding Director of the Stanford Center on Longevity

Richard J. Davidson, Neuroscientist, Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at the University of Wisconsin-Madision, Founder of the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds.

Measha Brueggergosman, soprano, opera, concert, and cabaret.

Ursula Franklin, physicist emeritus, crystallographer, peace activist, Quaker.


Reading List:


Monika Ardelt and Ad Bergsma, " Self-reported Wisdom and Happiness: an Empirical Investigation," Journal of Happiness Studies, 13 (3), 481-499, 2011.

_____________, "How Wise People Cope with Crises and Obstacles in Life," ReVision: a Journal of Consciousness and Transformation, 28 (1), 7-19.


Laura L. Carstensen, A Long Bright Future: an Action Plan for a Lifetime of Happiness, Health, and Financial Security, Broadway Books, 2009.


Vivian Clayton and J. Birren, " The Development of Wisdom Across the Life Span: a Re-examination of an Ancient Topic," in Baltes, P. & Brim, O.,  Life Span Development and Behavior (Academic Press, 1978).

    
Richard J. Davidson
with Sharon Begley, The Emotional Life of Your Brain, Hudson Street Press, 2012.


Ursula Franklin
, The Real World of Technology, CBC Massey lectures, House of Anansi Press, 1992.

_____________, The Ursula Franklin Rader: Pacifism as a Map, Between the Lines Books, 2006.


Stephen S. Hall, Wisdom: from Philosophy to Neuroscience, Knopf, Random, House, 2010.


Monty Hall and Bill Libby, Emcee Monty Hall, Ballantine Non-Fiction, 1973.


Jan Kahehti:io Longboat, C oming Home: Stories of Residential School Survivors, ed. dawn Kawenno:ta's Avery, Aboriginal Healing Foundation, Canada, 2010.


Howard C. Nusbaum & J.T. Cacioppo, " Expanding Neuroeconimics," Harvard College Economics Review, 3, 39-42, 2009.


John Vervaeke and Leonardo Ferrarro, "Relevance, Meaning and the Cognitive Science of Wisdom," The Scientific Study of Personal Wisdom: from Contemplative Traditions to Neuroscience, ed. Michael Ferrarri, Nicholas, Weststrate, Springer, 2013.

       

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