How we party now

A look at the growing popularity of Afrobeats music on Canadian dance floors with host Nana aba Duncan.

A look at the growing popularity of Afrobeats music on Canadian dance floors with host Nana aba Duncan.

Afrobeats advocate Chinedu Ukabam, left, with host Nana aba Duncan and DJ and host Odario Williams. (Tai B)

When I was in university and going to bars and clubs in Toronto, DJs did not play popular music from African countries. I only heard that kind of music at the Ghanaian parties, weddings and funerals my family and community organized.

Now, it's a different story. In Toronto, Montreal and Calgary bars and clubs, you can hear Afrobeats music from Nigeria, Ghana and beyond. But it's not just first, second and third-generation African immigrants turning up on the dancefloor. People of all backgrounds are enjoying the music—including, of course, the DJs who are becoming more enamoured and more informed about Afrobeats.

A look at the growing popularity of Afrobeats music on Canadian dance floors with host Nana aba Duncan. 53:59

For this special program, I talked to some of those DJs and Afrobeats advocates, who want the genre to become part of the Canadian experience.

Here's an Afrobeats mix by DJ Deemaks in Calgary, Alta.:

Chinedu Ukabam is the co-founder of Gumbo, a party series featuring Afrobeats and other music from the Caribbean and South America.

Chinedu Ukabam is the co-founder of Gumbo, a party series featuring afrobeats from Africa and other African diasporic music from the Caribbean and South America. Video by Chinedu Ukabam and Zavara. 1:00

This video of Oh My Gosh by Nigerian singer Yemi Alade was produced in Toronto and features Esi Mensah, the city's most prominent Afrobeats dancer.

Written by Nana aba Duncan. Catch this CBC Radio One special on Dec. 31 at 12 p.m. ET and Jan. 1 at 4 p.m. ET, or listen online.

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