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On the chase with producers from Out in the Open

'Chasing' is one of the most important skills in an audio producer's repertoire. It's exactly what it sounds like: identifying, tracking down and booking a guest for a specific segment or story. Regardless of a radio show or podcast's genre or format, chase producing is essential. It's also really hard.
'Chasing' is one of the most important skills in an audio producer's repertoire. It's exactly what it sounds like: identifying, tracking down and booking a guest for a specific segment or story. Regardless of a radio show or podcast's genre or format, chase producing is essential. It's also really hard.

Every producer has their own style and approach to chasing, and no two chases are the same. Chasing for a daily program, like The Current or As it Happens, can be like running a sprint; it requires a surge of adrenalin, intense focus and strategy. Chasing for a documentary is more like a marathon; a slow and steady effort that can seem to last for eternity.

We talked to the producers of CBC Radio's new show, Out in the Open, about how they manage to book a diverse range of people with real stories to tell and passionate opinions. 

You can listen to the first podcasts from Out in the Open now, and tune-in to hear the show's CBC Radio One début on Saturday, May 28 at 3 p.m. 

Featured in the video

Karen Chen comes to CBC Radio from Texas where she was an investigative reporter at the Houston Chronicle. She's from Ottawa, graduated from Medill at Northwestern University in Chicago, and has reported for The Washington Post, The Star in Johannesburg and other papers. 

Daniel Guillemette has been producing for the CBC Radio since 2010 with shows including q, As It Happens, Day 6, and Stripped. He was an Arthur F. Burns Fellow in 2015, and has his Master's from UBC.

Debbie Pacheco has been making radio at the CBC for about six years on shows like q, Day 6, Canada Reads, and Stripped. She also wrote a thesis once about the Portuguese-speaking community in Toronto.

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